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where can you buy black water

With celeb chuggers, an appearance in the Emmy Awards gift bag and representation by the Manzo brothers (of Real Housewives of New Jersey fame), this latest take on H20 is primed to take the water market by storm.

There is no quick fix or perfect food. And nothing shuttles nutrients into your body’s cells better than real food.
In case you haven’t heard, there’s something dark in the water. Just like the lbd (little black dress) is a must-have item in your closet, some claim blk. water (or rather, black water) should be a staple in your fridge.

The company boasts that blk. water contains both fulvic and humic acid (found in soil, sediment and aquatic environments). But neither fulvic acid or humic acid are required in humans.
According to Christine Gerbstadt, M.D., registered dietitian and author of Doctors Detox Diet, not a chance. Here’s why:
The addition of these two acids to water in no way enhances the nutritional benefits of water.
A plant-based diet will provide the same phytonutrients that black water claims to have, along with added soluble and insoluble fiber. Plus, plant foods will fill you up and help you shed pounds.
Blk. water’s dark color comes from the addition of fulvic acid produced by the biodegration of dead organic matter (yummy, right?). The product reportedly provides a bevy of trace minerals and electrolytes while also helping to balance the human body’s pH levels. A bonus: the word around the water cooler is that it makes a great hangover cure, because of its ability to quickly transport nutrients to cells.

But we’re not going to sugarcoat it: Not only is this stuff very dark (think stale coffee or flat Pepsi), experts argue that it’s more of a gimmick than a godsend. The packaging and minimalist design are very hip and the black color certainly draws attention, but is it really better than plain old water?

In case you haven't heard, there's something dark in the water. Just like the lbd (little black dress) is a must-have item in your closet, some claim blk. water (or rather, black water) should be a staple in your fridge….

Where can you buy black water

A bit like… cola. Only blacker, and not fizzy, or sweet, or with any discernable flavour other than water.

It’s not looking good for blk water (£47.99 for a case of 24 bottles) at this point. But hang on. Perhaps when they said fulvic minerals, what they meant was fulvic acid – which is a thing, or possibly several things – in a the presence of oh, say, some bicarbonate (*cough* 2 ingredients *cough*).
It raises many questions, doesn’t it? Let’s start with why. Obviously it’s a great marketing gimmick. It definitely looks different. It also comes with a number of interesting claims. The suppliers claim it contains “no nasties” and “only 2 ingredients”, namely spring water and “Fulvic Minerals” (sic). (Hang on, I hear you say, if it’s minerals, plural, surely that’s already more than two ingredients? Oh, but that’s only the start. Stay with me.)

Christmas is almost here! Are you ready yet? Are you fed up with people asking if you’re ready yet? Have you worked out what to buy for Great-uncle Nigel, who says he neither needs nor wants anything? Always a tricky scenario, that. Consumables are often a safe fallback position. They don’t clutter up the house, and who doesn’t enjoy a nice box of luxury biscuits, or chocolates, or a bottle of champagne, or spirts, or a case of blk water.
To sum up: it is black, and that’s kind of weird and a fun talking point – although if you like the idea of a black drink you can always drink cola. It doesn’t balance your pH levels – nothing does. I don’t believe it replenishes electrolyte levels either – how can it when it doesn’t contain sodium? – and I’m dubious about the “2 ingredients” claim (could you tell?). And the oh-so-healthy-sounding fulvic minerals are most likely due to contamination from coal deposits.
I don’t know about you, but I’m not totally convinced. I mean, as @geolizzy says in her tweet here (excuse the minor typo, she means humic, not humid), it sounds a bit like… water contaminated with hydrocarbon deposits?
It’s black water.
Tap water is chlorine-treated to keep it free of nasty bacteria.

A typical example of a humic acid.

Christmas is almost here! Are you ready yet? Are you fed up with people asking if you're ready yet? Have you worked out what to buy for Great-uncle Nigel, who says he neither needs nor wants anything? Always a tricky scenario, that. Consumables are often a safe fallback position. They don't clutter up the house, and who…