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week 3 of flowering

Week 3 of flowering

For most cannabis strains, the flowering period will last about 7-9 weeks, although some sativas require even longer for their buds to mature.

When the flowering period starts, it isn’t an abrupt change in your plants’ growth. Cannabis won’t just stop growing and then go into flowering right away. In these first weeks of flowering, many cannabis strains may indeed undergo a considerable growth stretch. This is important to know when it comes to feeding your plants properly, but also if you want to give them sufficient space to grow.
Your cannabis plants have still not entirely stopped growing and will now be about 50% bigger than what they were just three weeks earlier. Although still stretching a bit, the stretch will now gradually slow down and soon come to a complete halt.

What happens during flowering and at what exact time can somewhat vary depending on the particular strain you are growing. So don’t expect your plants to follow this schedule to the T; see it more as a general guideline that you can go by. Let us look at the flowering phase of cannabis week by week.
The flowering stage is when your cannabis plants grow their aromatic and soon-to-be-smokeable buds. This is a particularly important stage in your cannabis plants’ life cycle. A lot happens in the flowering stage; learn how to care for your plants through every week of flowering.
In the very first weeks of flowering, your cannabis plants will be in the transition stage. Thinking that winter is not far away and that she will soon have to carry a big load of bud, your plant will likely grow rapidly. Some strains can almost double in height during this time. Because of the fast growth that your plant is undergoing now, this early flowering phase is also known as the stretch phase.
While your plant is putting in quite some overtime to gain size and height, she will grow a number of new leaves mostly at the top of the main colas. Your cannabis plant is busy growing “green stuff,” like leaves and stems so she can become stronger and sturdier.
As your plants become more picky, you should check for potential deficiencies that could manifest in various ways, such as discoloured, yellowing leaves or loss of leaves entirely. At the same time, you should also check your plants for signs of possible overfeeding (“nutrient burn”) that could show up around this time as well. Nutrient burn will usually show in the tips of the leaves becoming discoloured. If this happens, you need to cut down on feeding.

To properly feed your plants once they start to flower and to initiate the first signs of growing buds, you should check your nutrient manufacturer’s schedule. It is normally around this time at week 2 where you will have to increase flowering nutrients to help your plants reach their maximum yield potential.

What happens during the flowering phase of cannabis? Learn about flowering week by week. This guide will help you maximise flower production and THC content.

Week 3 of flowering

Cannabis plants go through different stages of life before reaching harvest. These stages are: germination, pre-growth, growth and flowering. Depending on the phase of life, the care and feeding required can vary greatly, in this case we’re going to focus on the flowering period of cannabis and the changing nutritional demands upon our plants.

Mature trichomes ready for harvest
The first pistils appear

Sativa varieties with significant stretch:
In the penultimate week of cultivation, or the 8th week for 9 week plants, the nutrients input is reduced or completely removed. It must be said that to go well, you have to reduce the nutrients little by little to avoid stress that could lead to the formation of small male flowers at the end of the cycle. If all the fertiliser is removed at the same time, as in the case of hydroponic grows, the EC levels between the plant and the substrate vary greatly and the plant will try to equalise both ECs (internal and external of the substrate) by evacuating all the salts it can, leading to an unstable metabolism and a consequent stress that could cause unwanted hermaphroditism in plants.
We can also find certain fertilisers like Powder Feeding that are formulated specifically for long or short flowering varieties:
Before being harvested, the vast majority of the cannabis plants leaves should be a yellow colour. This indicates a lack of nitrogen and other nutrients in them, which assures us that the buds will have a superior flavour and aroma since there will be no interferences caused by the salts accumulated in the leaves, stems and flowers.
Not all indica or sativa plants are the same, so their diet shouldn’t be either. For example, if two Indica strains are grown in the same crop, we may have to make small variations in the feeding between the different plants. However, often these nutrient variations are not very large, so we can find a midpoint that works well for both types of genetics.

Now the plants no longer need high doses of nutrients to finish ripening, we’ll avoid adding more fertilisers. To know when to harvest your plants you must examine the trichomes carefully and wait until the vast majority of them have a cloudy white colour and some of them an amber, red or other colour.

Without a doubt, flowering is one of the crucial stages in cannabis cultivation. In this article we tell you everything you need to know about the blo