Weeds And Seeds Recipe

Learn what causes weeds, how to prevent them in your garden, and how to mix up 7 powerful DIY weed killers using ingredients in your kitchen. This ramen noodle salad with cabbage, almonds, and sunflower seeds is light and crunchy. A simple vinaigrette ties all the flavors together! Wild in the Kitchen – Recipes for Wild Fruits, Weeds and Seeds by Ronna Mogelon This book has the look and feel of the Moosewood Cookbook. The plant and food art within is stylistic – creating a

Weeds Don’t Stand A Chance Against These 7 DIY Natural Weed Killers

Joelle Speranza is a lifestyle writer, author, and publicist with a passion for empowering girls of all ages and life stages to live their best lives. She has been published in outlets including HuffPost, LittleThings, YourTango, Mom.com, Today.com Parenting Community, Teen People magazine, Venus Magazine, and TheNest. She is the author of “Trash the Dress: Stories of Celebrating Divorce in your 20s” and the children’s book “Princess Genevieve: The Hero with Girl Power.”

Our editors have independently chosen the products listed on this page. If you purchase something mentioned in this article, we may earn a small commission.

They say beauty is pain, and when it comes to gardening, this popular phrase resonates with many hobbyists and horticulturists. Beautiful blooms and picturesque landscapes don’t come without hard work. And for the most part, those who garden all have one obstacle to overcome: weeds.

What causes weeds?

Most garden weeds start by seed, according to Tasha Greer, an Epicurean homesteader and author of Weed-Free Gardening: A Comprehensive and Organic Approach to Weed Management. “However, some also spread from one area to another by runners on top of soil or rhizomes under soil,” Greer tells mbg. While some weeds may be dormant or die back in the winter, they can regrow in spring or summer.

See also  Growing Weed From Seed

“The main culprits that cause weeds to suddenly break dormancy and grow like crazy are soil disturbance, bare or underplanted soil, insufficient water, poor drainage, sudden changes in soil temperature, and over-fertilization,” Greer adds.

In other words, weeds are everywhere, waiting to happen! And beyond being an eyesore to some, certain weeds can affect the overall health of your garden over time (though others are totally harmless and even beneficial).

“Some weeds can influence long-term soil health by encouraging populations of certain bacteria or fungi to increase,” notes Greer. “Those fungi and bacteria can then alter the soil pH and nutrient availability, endangering even well-established perennials like shrubs and trees.”

Fret not, though. There are ways to combat weeds at home if you’d rather keep your garden looking clean and clear (though the wild look can be lovely too). While the first instinct for those who don’t want to buy harsh conventional treatments may be to turn to apple cider vinegar, that’s far from your only option.

Top Ramen Salad

This ramen noodle salad is light and crunchy. It’s excellent with BBQ chicken. This recipe is from my mother-in-law and has been a family favorite for years.

Gallery

Recipe Summary

Ingredients

  • 2 (3 ounce) packages chicken-flavored ramen noodles, broken into pieces, seasoning packets reserved
  • ½ cup raw sunflower seeds
  • ½ cup slivered almonds
  • 1 (16 ounce) package coleslaw mix
  • 3 green onions, chopped
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Step 1

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Spread ramen noodles, sunflower seeds, and almonds onto a baking sheet.

Bake noodle mixture in the preheated oven until fragrant and toasted, 10 to 15 minutes. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

Combine coleslaw mix and green onions in a large bowl; sprinkle cooled noodle mixture over the top.

See also  How Many Seeds Can A Weed Plant Produce

Make dressing: Whisk olive oil, reserved ramen seasoning packets, vinegar, sugar, and black pepper together in a bowl until smooth.

Pour dressing over noodle mixture and toss to coat.

450 calories; protein 9.9g; carbohydrates 34.9g; fat 31.1g; cholesterol 6.1mg; sodium 323.9mg. Full Nutrition

Reviews ( 32 )

Most helpful positive review

I have been making and eating this salad for years. This is a good recipe to start, but don’t be afraid to try other flavors of Raman. Also, try adding more veggies. Broccoli slaw works well alone or with the coleslaw, chop up some celery for more crunch. Diced peppers, cucumber, radishes, etc. I think you get the point. Use whatever you like to eat. The other variable is the vinegar. There are many different flavors of vinegar. If you are like me, you will never eat the same salad twice.

Most helpful critical review

Not sweet enough. Had tried another recipe for this salad and found it much more Asian tasting. The vegetable and topping mixture was very good, but the dressing was lacking. Won’t make again.

  • 5 star values:

I have been making and eating this salad for years. This is a good recipe to start, but don’t be afraid to try other flavors of Raman. Also, try adding more veggies. Broccoli slaw works well alone or with the coleslaw, chop up some celery for more crunch. Diced peppers, cucumber, radishes, etc. I think you get the point. Use whatever you like to eat. The other variable is the vinegar. There are many different flavors of vinegar. If you are like me, you will never eat the same salad twice.

Add sesame oil to the dressing instead of regular for flavor

I have made this for years, but I add a can of drained mandarin oranges and one pound of chicken tenders, chopped into bite size and sauteed to make it a meal instead of a side dish. I also use apple cider vinegar vs white and the Oriental Flavor Ramen Noodles vs the Chicken Flavor. Always a hit!

See also  Winter Weed Seeds

Wild in the Kitchen – Recipes for Wild Fruits, Weeds and Seeds by Ronna Mogelon

This book has the look and feel of the Moosewood Cookbook. The plant and food art within is stylistic – creating a down home mood more than serving to identify the plants illustrated within. Ronna Mogelon is a chef (she studied cooking at George Brown College in Toronto Canada), amateur naturalist, graphic designer and food stylist for the movie industry. She lives in a 100-year-old log home on a farm in rural Ontario Canada.

At the beginning of the book Ronna gives some brief tips on how to proceed if you are not a botanist, on preservation and canning, and has a small section on the conventional ingredients she prefers to use in her recipes. Her ‘recipe’ chapters are titled Berries; Flowers; Fruits; Greens; Mushrooms; and Roots. Recipes are offered plant by plant. So after a brief discussion and a few tips about using barberry, for instance, she’ll offer up one to four recipes.

Sometimes her tips are insightful and help you to improvise. Some of the recipes are titled: “Dandelion Flower Marmalade Jelly”, “Orange-and-Currant-Stuffed Wild Grape Leaves”, and “Charred Chicken with Fettucini and Creamed Morels”. At the end of the book she has a key to Latin names for plants she’s used in her recipes and a section for recommended readings. This book would make a sweet gift for the kind of person who would like the Moosewood cookbooks. The recipes would be fun to try for anyone who enjoys cooking with wild foods.