Weed Seed Identification App

NEW WEBSITE FOR SEED IDENTIFICATION A website https://www.idseed.org/ has recently been launched by the International Seed Morphology Association to “promote collaboration, knowledge sharing, resource development, and research…” and “…to be a scientific source of seed morphology knowledge and expertise, publishing interactive digital identification tools and establishing a seed identification database for weeds, economically important plant… The Weed ID App for iPhone – Identification tool featuring detailed grass-weed images never seen before. Quick and easy access to extensive weed library; 140 species, 1000 images. Mapmyweed tool to help pinpoint location of weed problems on a google map. Developed in association with ADAS . Identification key to the official federal noxious weeds found in the U.S

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NEW WEBSITE FOR SEED IDENTIFICATION

NEW WEBSITE FOR SEED IDENTIFICATION

A website https://www.idseed.org/ has recently been launched by the International Seed Morphology Association to “promote collaboration, knowledge sharing, resource development, and research…” and “…to be a scientific source of seed morphology knowledge and expertise, publishing interactive digital identification tools and establishing a seed identification database for weeds, economically important plant species and wild plant species”.

With a particular emphasis on providing assistance to biosecurity and quarantine agencies, concerned with preventing the introduction of invasive weeds, the site provides information on various resources, including a Seed Identification Guide (https://www.idseed.org/seedidguide/home.html), currently consisting of seed identification fact sheets for 127 species, a searchable image gallery, botany glossary, and Lucid seed identification keys with links to two online keys.

The website also provides resources for authors who are interested in developing and publishing seed identification factsheets or images, including protocols, template and standard feature descriptions. See more at https://www.idseed.org/authors.html. We welcome authors and collaborators to enrich the resources and the Seed Identification Guide for end users.

Both seed keys are Lucid keys: one key is to 36 common plant families, where a family identification is needed for an unknown seed or fruit. The following feature descriptors are used: Seed shape, Colour, Surface features, Hilum-Attachment scar, Size (Length/Diameter range).

See also  Wild Weed Seeds

The other key is to the propagules or fruits of 102 biosecurity-relevant species of the daisy or sunflower family Asteraceae. It was produced by CSIRO scientist Alexander Schmidt-Lebuhn at the Australian National Herbarium (CANB) in collaboration with and through funding from the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

For more information please contact:

Dr Ruojing Wang
Seed Science and Technology Section, Saskatoon Laboratory
Canadian Food Inspection Agency / Government of Canada
E-mail: [email protected]

Weed ID App

Based on the acclaimed Encyclopaedia of Arable Weeds and developed in association with ADAS, the BASF Weed ID app aims to provide an easy to use reference guide to the major broad-leaved weeds and grass-weeds in the UK supporting weed identification of 140 species.

* “Mapmyweed” tool is available for iPhone and Android phone only.

The Main features

  • Quick and easy access to extensive weed library; >140 species, >1000 images
  • Full description of each weed species at cotyledon, young plant and mature plant growth stages supported by accompanying pictures aiding identification
  • Detailed grass-weed line drawings to highlight distinguishing features often too difficult to see from a photograph
  • Interactive search of weed library via Weed ID Filter, Common Name List, Scientific Name List, or Free Text Search
  • Map-my-Weed tool to help pinpoint location of weeds on a google map; assign name, size of patch and year*
  • Option to photograph the weed in your field and use to directly compare with images in the app library
  • Export your weed photo and it’s GPS location by email to customers / colleagues at the touch of a button
  • Simple and fast interface

The BASF Weed ID app brings weed identification right up to date, forgoing the need to take books into the field to identify potential weed species. Whatever crop you are growing, it is an essential part of good agricultural practice to know the weed species you need to control in order to use the most appropriate herbicide. This app has been designed to be an easy to use in-field practical aid to Crop Advisors, Growers, Trainee Agronomists and Agricultural Students. Correctly identifying weeds is the first step to effective control – download our smart, easy to use tool today.

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Already downloaded the app?

We need your feedback to make the app even better and would love to know what you think of it, and more importantly, additional features and information we could make available via the app to help you.

Federal Noxious Weeds Key

Officials in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) have determined that certain species not native to the U.S. are at risk of becoming invasive should they enter this country. As part of its effort to prevent the introduction of invasive or potentially invasive weeds, the USDA maintains an official list of “federal noxious weeds” (FNW) (7 CFR 360.200 and 361.6). Many taxa on this list are currently serious weeds elsewhere in the world, and about two-thirds of the taxa are currently found in the U.S. Most of the FNW taxa are angiosperms, but a few are ferns and one is a green alga. NOTE that the ferns and alga are not included in this app.

Fruits and seeds are the plant disseminules most responsible for the spread of weeds to new regions. Federal Noxious Weed Disseminules of the U.S. Keys was developed to enable accurate identification of FNW angiosperm disseminules. The three keys (Grasses=Poaceae; Legumes=Fabaceae; and Other Angiosperm Plant Families) were designed to be used by officials at U.S. ports responsible for identification of plant pests. It may also be a useful resource for seed professionals and anyone else with an interest in, or a need to know about, noxious weed disseminules.

Thirty-one families are currently represented on the FNW list as of 2013. Most of the taxa are individual species, but two are species complexes, Rubus fruticosus L. agg. and Salvinia auriculata complex (not included in the app key since an aquatic ferm), and one is an infraspecific taxon (Setaria pumila (Poir.) Roem. & Schult. ssp. pallidefusca (Schumach) B. K. Simon). Note that fact sheets for the FNW species of six genera Aeginetia, Alectra, Cuscuta, Moraea, Orobanche, Striga have been treated together in their own “genus-level” fact sheets.

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The three interactive family keys include only those FNW taxa that produce seed and fruit disseminules (i.e., angiosperms). Eight taxa are not included in the interactive keys either because they lack angiosperm sexual reproduction altogether or they produce seed only rarely. One group lacking fruits and seeds are the ferns, which reproduce via spores as well as by vegetative means. Reproduction via vegetative disseminules is the primary means of dispersal for some non-ferns (three angiosperms and an alga) as well. The eight taxa not in the keys are the terrestial ferns Lygodium flexuosum (L.) Sw. and Lygodium microphyllum (Cav.) R. Br., the aquatic ferns Azolla pinnata R.Br. and the Salvinia auriculata complex, the aquatic angiosperms Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle and Lagarosiphon major (Ridley) Moss, the sterile angiosperm hybrid Opuntia aurantiaca Lindl., and the alga Caulerpa taxifolia (Vahl) Agardh.

All photographic images were produced by the authors except where acknowledged in image captions. See FNW tool for proper guidelines for use and citation of images. The majority of original illustrations were drawn by Lesley Randall. The remainder were drawn by Ingrid Hogle and Julia Scher. Drawings by Lynda E. Chandler are from Gunn and Ritchie (1988). Drawings by Regina O. Hughes are from Terrell and Peterson (1993) and Reed (1977).