Weed Seed Feed Protect

State Prohibited Noxious Weeds Prohibited noxious weeds are annual, biennial, or perennial plants We can take a lot of advice from nature and permaculture principles when it comes to planning and human resource management in organisations. As with any farming or production process necessity is the mother of invention. Weed, Seed, Feed, Protect. Отметки "Нравится": 2. Здоровье/красота

Minnesota Noxious Weed List

Prohibited noxious weeds are annual, biennial, or perennial plants that the commissioner designates as having the potential or are known to be detrimental to human or animal health, the environment, public roads, crops, livestock or other property. There are two regulatory listings for prohibited noxious weeds in Minnesota. Each of the categories on the list includes all cultivars of each species unless otherwise listed as “exempt” or “exemption for” with the exempted cultivar name listed.

1. Eradicate List: Prohibited noxious weeds that are listed to be eradicated are plants that are not currently known to be present in Minnesota or are not widely established. These species must be eradicated, meaning all of the above and below ground parts of the plant must be destroyed, as required by Minnesota Statutes, Section 18.78. Additionally, transportation, propagation, or sale of these is prohibited except as allowed by Minnesota Statutes, Section 18.82. Measures must also be taken to prevent and exclude these species from being introduced into Minnesota.

Common Name Scientific Name Year added to list
1. Black swallow-wort Cyanchum louiseae Kartesz & Gandhi 2013
2. Brown knapweed Centaurea jacea L. 2013
3. Common teasel Dipsacus fullonum L. 2012
4. Cutleaf teasel Dipsacus laciniatus L. 2012
5. Dalmatian toadflax Linaria dalmatica (L.) Mill 2012
6. Diffuse knapweed Centaurea diffusa L. 2017
7. Giant hogweed Heracleum mantegazzianum Sommier & Levier 2012
8. Grecian foxglove Digitalis lanata Ehrh. 2010
9. Japanese honeysuckle (and all cultivars) Lonicera japonica Thunb. 2020
10. Japanese hops Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc. 2012
11. Meadow knapweed Centaurea x moncktonii C.E. Britton 2013
12. Oriental bittersweet Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. 2011
13. Palmer amaranth Amaranthus palmeri S. Watson 2015
14. Poison hemlock Conium maculatum L. 2018
15. Tree of heaven Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle 2017
16. Yellow starthistle Centaurea solstitialis L. 2010

Giant hogweed and yellow starthistle are not known to be in Minnesota but have been determined to be a threat to invade the state.

2. Control List: Prohibited noxious weeds listed to be controlled are plants established throughout Minnesota or regions of the state. Species on this list must be controlled, meaning efforts must be made to prevent the spread, maturation and dispersal of any propagating parts, thereby reducing established populations and preventing reproduction and spread as required by Minnesota Statutes, Section 18.78. Additionally, propagation, sale, or transportation of these plants is prohibited except as allowed by Minnesota Statutes, Section 18.82.

Common Name Scientific Name Year added to list
1. Bohemian knotweed Polygonum x bohemicum (J. Chrtek & Chrtkova) Zika & Jacobson 2020
2. Canada thistle Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop. 1872
3. Common barberry Berberis vulgaris L. 2017
4. Common tansy Tanacetum vulgare L. 2010
5. Giant knotweed Polygonum sachalinese F. Schmidt ex Maxim 2014
6. Japanese knotweed Polygonum cuspidatum Seibold & Zucc. 2014
7. Leafy spurge Euphorbia esula L. 1992
8. Narrowleaf bittercress Cardamine impatiens L. 2012
9. Non-native phragmites Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin ex Steud. ssp. australis 2013
10. Plumeless thistle Carduus acanthoides L. 1975
11 Purple loosestrife Lythrum salicaria L. 1992
12. Spotted knapweed Centaurea stoebe L. ssp. micranthos (Gugler) Hayek 2001
13. Wild parsnip Pastinaca sativa L. (except for non-wild cultivated varieties) 2010

Restricted Noxious Weeds

Restricted noxious weeds are plants that are widely distributed in Minnesota and are detrimental to human or animal health, the environment, public roads, crops, livestock or other property, but whose only feasible means of control is to prevent their spread by prohibiting the importation, sale, and transportation of their propagating parts in the state except as allowed by Minnesota Statutes, Section 18.82. Plants designated as Restricted Noxious Weeds may be reclassified if effective means of control are developed. Each of the categories on the list includes all cultivars of each species unless otherwise listed as “exempt” or “exemption for” with the exempted cultivar name listed.

See also  How To Grow A Weed Seed Without Soil
Common Name Scientific Name Year added to list
1. Amur honeysuckle Lonicera maackii (Rupr.) Herder 2017
2. Bell’s honeysuckle Lonicera x bella Zabel 2017
3. Black locust Robinia pseudoacacia L. 2017
4. Common or European buckthorn Rhamnus cathartica L. 1999
5. Crown vetch Securigera varia (L.) Lassen 2017
6. European alder Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. 2020
7. Garlic mustard Alliaria petiolata Bieb. 2013
8. Glossy buckthorn (and all cultivars) Frangula alnus Mill. 1999
9. Japanese barberry cultivars Berberis thunbergii DC. 2015
10. Morrow’s honeysuckle Lonicera morrowii A. Gray 2017
11. Multiflora rose Rosa multiflora Thunb. 2012
12. Porcelain berry Ampelopsis brevipedunculata (Maxim.) Trautv. 2017
13. Siberian peashrub Caragana arborescens Lam. (exemption for Green Spires® Caragana – Caragana ‘Jefarb’) 2020
14. Tatarian honeysuckle Lonicera tatarica L. 2017
15. Wild carrot/Queen Anne’s Lace Daucus carota L. 2017

Japanese barberry cultivars banned from sale:

‘Anderson’ (Lustre Green™); ‘Angel Wings’; ‘Antares’; ‘Bailgreen’ (Jade Carousel®);‘Bailone’ (Ruby Carousel®); ‘Bailsel’ (Golden Carousel® – B. koreana × B. thunbergii hybrid); ‘Bailtwo’ (Burgundy Carousel®); B. thunbergii var. atropurpurea; ‘Crimson Velvet’; ‘Erecta’; ‘Gold Ring’; ‘Inermis’; ‘JN Redleaf’ (Ruby Jewel™); ‘JN Variegated’ (Stardust™); ‘Kelleris’; ‘Kobold’; ‘Marshall Upright’; ‘Monomb’ (Cherry Bomb™); ‘Painter’s Palette’; ‘Pow Wow’; ‘Red Rocket’; ‘Rose Glow’; ‘Silver Mile’; ‘Sparkle’; ‘Tara’ (Emerald Carousel® – B. koreana × B. thunbergii hybrid); Wild Type (parent species – green barberry)

Specially Regulated Plants

Specially regulated plants are plants that may be native species or have demonstrated economic value, but also have the potential to cause harm in non-controlled environments. Plants designated as specially regulated have been determined to pose ecological, economical, or human or animal health concerns. Plant specific management plans and or rules that define the use and management requirements for these plants will be developed by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture for each plant designated as specially regulated. Measures must also be taken to minimize the potential for harm caused by these plants. Each of the categories on the list includes all cultivars of each species unless otherwise listed as “exempt” or “exemption for” with the exempted cultivar name listed.

Common Name Scientific Name Year added to list Special regulation
1. Amur maple Acer ginnala Maxim. 2016 Sellers shall affix a label directly to the plant or container packaging that is being sold that advises buyers to only plant Amur maple and its cultivars in landscapes where the seedlings will be controlled by mowing or other means. Amur maple seed is wind dispersed and trees should be planted at least 100 yards from natural areas.
2. Norway maple (and all cultivars) Acer platanoides L. 2020 Sellers shall affix a label directly to the plant or container packaging that is being sold that advises buyers to only plant Norway maple and its cultivars in landscapes where the seedlings will be controlled by mowing or other means. Norway maple seed is wind dispersed and trees should be planted at least 100 yards from natural areas.
3. Poison ivy Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kuntze & T. rydbergii (Small) Green 2010 Must be eradicated or controlled for public safety along rights-of-ways, trails, public accesses, business properties open to the public or on parts of lands where public access for business or commerce is granted. Must also be eradicated or controlled along property borders when requested by adjoining landowners.
4. Winged burning bush (and all cultivars) Euonymus alatus Thunb. 2020 Three-year production phase-out period, after which sale of this species will be prohibited and the species will move to the Restricted list in 2023.
See also  Micro Seeds In Weed

County Noxious Weeds

County noxious weeds are plants that are designated by individual county boards to be prohibited within the county’s jurisdiction and must be approved by the Commissioner of Agriculture, in consultation with the Noxious Weed Advisory Committee. Each county board must submit newly proposed County Noxious Weeds to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture for review. Approved County Noxious Weeds shall also be posted with the county’s general weed notice prior to May 15th each year. Counties are solely responsible for developing County Noxious Weed lists and their enforcement. Contact your County Agricultural Inspector or County Designated Employee for more information or see a current listing of County Noxious Weeds.

Federal Noxious Weeds

Federal terrestrial and parasitic listed noxious weeds are prohibited in Minnesota. Federal noxious weeds are selected and enforced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and can be reported to the local Animal Plant Health Inspection Service Office (APHIS) in Minneapolis, MN or to the MDA Noxious and Invasive Weed Program. A list of federal noxious weeds and information about the federal weed program can be viewed at the USDA APHIS web site.

Need, Seed, Feed, Weed and Lead

We can take a lot of advice from nature and permaculture principles when it comes to planning and human resource management in organisations.

As with any farming or production process necessity is the mother of invention. The key is to clearly identify the need at the start. The end point is the inspiration. Defining the need requires visionary planning:

* Who are we intending to feed? Who are the stakeholders?

* What is our desired outcome?

* What is our vision and purpose?

* How would we measure our success?

Seeding in analogous with recruitment. We need to seed the organization with the talent and capabilities required to achieve the objectives.

Permaculture instructs us that diversity is essential in the garden. The same is true of organisations. We need a variety of inter-dependent skills, as well as a range of different perspectives to provide the healthy conflict that promotes growth. It is necessary to acquire the seeds of the strongest stains suitable to the specific environment.

* What skills do we need, what is missing?

* How do we represent the complete range of perspectives that reflect all stakeholders?

* Where will we find them?

* How can we attract and recruit the best?

Feeding is all about ensuring that the organization is healthy and effectively utilizing resources essential for growth.

Permaculture advises that soil health and vitality is essential to success. You can not grow anything of value in poor soil. The initial priority is to ensure that there is enough organic material in the soil before planting. This does not simply provide plants with the nutrients required, but also provides an organic sponge to hold water in the soil making better use of this critical resource. You also must know your soil – is it acid or alkaline, deep or shallow, clay or rock? Yes, this can be changed over time through careful management but you must understand what you have at the start.

Cutting corners on soil health will likely lead to failure, as well as inefficient and costly use of resources such as water and fertilizer. Investing in time and resources up front requires patience, but this patience is rewarded.

I liken the soil with the organisations balance sheet, and particularly ones tangible and intangible assets. Without a strong balance sheet, assets that provide competitive advantage, and access to capital it is very difficult to succeed. The Permaculture approach is to invest in the assets rather than focus too heavily on driving revenue prematurely or too-frugal cost management.

See also  Dead Weed Seed

* What are our assets – cash, property, capability and capacity, brands, people, supply and distribution partnerships?

* What is missing that requires investment up front?

* How can careful investment in quality assets lead to greater productivity and cost efficiency later?

Permaculture gardens are not only diverse, but they allow diversity to flourish. We have pumpkins growing up and over lemon trees at Penobscot. Birds, including poultry provide our pest control as well as organic matter. Bees are our most important little farmers. Permaculture gardens can look shambolic.

Organisations that follow permaculture principles can also look chaotic. The organization structure and hierarchy may not be obvious, but if you look hard enough the accountabilities are well defined and understood. Diversity is respected. Yes, the other part of feeding an environment for success is corporate culture.

Feeding also refers to intellectual feeding – training, coaching, mentoring, and guiding.

Despite encouraging diversity of all kinds, this does not include weeds. Weeds are non-productive plants that take critical resources – water, sunlight, and nutrients – away from the garden. Some are downright toxic.

The same can be said of an organization. Every individual must create value for the collective organization. In a healthy culture there is amazing synergy that facilitates individual growth as a collective. However, some people are weeds. They take up resources – money, time, oxygen – and counter-productively create anxiety, destructive conflict, and negativity. They block development. If they are weeded (terminated) it creates the opportunity for a new individual to be seeded into the organization. Too many politically-correct organisations go out of their way to protect the individual rights of weeds.

Weeds are the scourge of a permaculture garden. We do not have time to be politically correct when growing food. However, we will not spray them with herbicides because this changes the chemistry of our environment and drive mutations of stronger weeds.

The same can be said of organisations. You must pull up the weeds, roots and all, and before they seed! They must be surgically removed before they affect and infect the rest of the organisation’s culture, and without penalizing the healthy individuals.

Permaculture farms don’t just happen. There need plans and leadership. Jared Murray is our Farmer, he is a Healer – healing the soil and leaving a legacy of health after every season, and he is also the Leader.

Effective leadership in a Permaculture Farm requires constant observation, experiential learning, subtle adaption, and hard physical work. Where does the sunlight go at different times of the year, where do trees cast shadows, how is the water management plan going, are we getting on top of the weeds, what plants are flourishing and others struggling, what tastes great.

In organization effective leaders are equally observant and sensitive to subtle changes in culture, performance, conflicts and anxiety. They keep close to all stakeholders, notice and reward success. They know what resources to apply where, to whom, and when. They constantly consult, encourage collaboration and personally participate in the work.

Чтобы просмотреть или добавить комментарий, выполните вход Чтобы просмотреть или добавить комментарий, выполните вход

Facebook

Weed, Seed, Feed, Protect есть на Facebook. Чтобы связаться с Weed, Seed, Feed, Protect, войдите в существующий аккаунт или создайте новый.

Weed, Seed, Feed, Protect есть на Facebook. Чтобы связаться с Weed, Seed, Feed, Protect, войдите в существующий аккаунт или создайте новый.

Facebook показывает информацию, которая поможет вам лучше понять цель Страницы. Просматривайте действия людей, которые управляют контентом и публикуют его.