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weed quality

Weed quality

Similar to the appearance, the taste and aroma of dank will also depend on the strain’s terpene profile. One quick sniff of top-shelf bud will pry open a world of aroma that is louder and tastier than milder mids could ever evoke. Taste will also be determined by the strain type and the presence of certain terpenes. If the abundance of trichomes doesn’t convince you of the dankness of a particular strain, a complex, well-balanced aroma and flavor can indicate a high-quality nug.

With top-shelf weed, potency should be expected. THC levels for the particular product you select will depend on the strain and grower. You can find lab analysis results on the packaging of products sold in most adult-use and medical markets. In general, top-shelf flower in recreational markets will have high THC levels — anywhere from 25% to 35%. But THC potency isn’t necessary for consideration as top-shelf. On the medical market, for instance, high-CBD strains such as Charlotte’s Web are also seen as top-shelf selections.
More closely related to dank than schwag weed , mids weed is, as the term denotes, middle-of-the-road in quality. Although legalization has caused an influx of high-quality weed to flood legal markets, prices for top-shelf bud can be prohibitive. This has made mids an enticing option for those living in legal states, as it offers a decent bang for your buck. While some dispensaries classify mids as lower-potency strains, this could end up being a bargain for consumers who prefer something lower in THC and higher in other cannabinoids.

Curing is an important part of the cultivation process that, if done improperly, can turn top-shelf potential into mids. Mids will sometimes have a grassy or harsh taste due to improper curing. Aside from the lack of aromatic enjoyment, additional signs of poorly cured weed include dampness to the bud and stems that don’t easily snap.
It depends. If you never smoke or consume cannabis, you will have a low tolerance. So “mids”, or cannabis that contains THC percentages around 10% to 16%, would likely do the job if you’re a beginner. If the weed is mids, it will have a smaller concentration of trichomes, which means less cannabinoids and terpenes. As a result, it will not smell very potent.
Schwag weed is typically grown in a harsh environment, causing the buds to form early without the glittery trichomes commonly found on the surface of flower designated as dank or mids.
Depending on the location, mids will boast THC contents ranging anywhere from 10% to 16%, or sometimes higher in legal states. The price of mids will also vary on the where they’re being sold.
Top-shelf, high-quality nugs can range from bright green to a darker green with streaks of purple, often heavily blanketed with sugary trichomes and vibrant hairs that boast a fiery orange or red hue. Most kind bud comes in the form of dense, vibrant, frosty nugs. The trichomes should sparkle when the surface is struck with light.

Dank, fire, that good good. Whatever you wish to call it, this is the type of weed that you’ll find on the top shelves of dispensaries, a diverse cast of strains that vary in effects, flavors, and aromas. In legal states, top-shelf weed usually comes at a top-shelf price, as an eighth of dank can cost upwards of $60 on some adult-use markets. Ultimately, the price will vary on a number of factors, such as the dispensary location, cultivator, and product availability. Think of top-shelf bud as craft beer, carefully curated to offer unique aromas and flavors. In most adult-use markets, top-shelf weed tends to have a focus on higher THC levels .

The Difference Between Dank, Mids, and Reggie Weed Consider for a moment the difference between a cheap bottle of wine from the local convenience store and a pricey selection from an upscale

Weed quality

So get out there, look for the four main indicators — smell, look, feel, and flower structure — to find a strain that best suits your personal taste.

Let’s quickly define flower before we get started. The term flower refers to the dried and cured female cannabis plant’s blooms, often called “nugs” or “buds.” Flower is typically intoxicating — THC content is the primary indicator of euphoric potency — but some flower has high CBD content and will produce less intoxicating effects.
When flower is of a lower quality, it will often be dry or brittle to the touch. Dry bud will feel light and airy with no weight behind it, unlike dense, sticky flower. Additionally, subpar flower will easily crumble when handled, or might even be falling apart. Loose, undone flower is called “shake” and should be avoided.

Cannabis cultivated and cured to the highest standards typically exhibits a pungent and pleasant aroma. Flowers emitting a strong fragrance are commonly referred to as having a “dank” or “loud” odor, indicating the overall quality of the flower. There are a variety of terms for the types of aromas high-quality cannabis emits, including “skunky,” “diesely” and “piney.”
There are four main indicators when delineating between high-quality flower and subpar flower: Smell, look , feel, and flower structure.
Overly “wet” buds have stems that don’t snap and tend to stay put when squeezed. The extra moisture content makes for the perfect breeding ground for mold and mildew. Wet nugs that tear apart rather than break apart are a sign that a cultivator didn’t properly dry and cure their cannabis.
While all good cannabis should be visually appealing, a top-shelf strain can easily display an vibrant array of colors. Good-quality flowers are often a deep or lime green with flaming orange or red hairs. They can also express colors from deep purple to bright blue, but should never display brown tones.
Another important visual indicator is the amount of trichomes. Trichomes are the tiny, glimmering crystal-like appendages on the plant’s surface that create and hold the compounds responsible for the flower’s smell, flavor, and effects. The more trichomes you can see with the naked eye, the better indicator of the flower’s intoxicating and therapeutic potency.

Though a plant’s structure really says nothing about its chemical composition, it can still tell a story. Improper lighting or growing conditions can lead to “fluffy” or “airy” nugs, and while they may contain high levels of cannabinoids and terpenes, their density is still widely and harshly dismissed by the cannabis community.

New to purchasing marijuana & cannabis products? Read our beginner's guide to buying marijuana and cannabis.