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water ph for cannabis

Water ph for cannabis
HI-98107 pHep pH tester provides fast and accurate pH readings. The easy-to-use device is designed for non-technical users, and can help both novice and advanced growers measure water pH.
pH is a measure of how acidic or alkaline something is. The pH scale ranges from 1–14, with a pH of 7 being neutral (the pH of pure water). If pH is lower than 7, a substance is considered acidic (think vinegar or lemon juice). If the pH is higher than 7, the substance is alkaline, as is the case with soaps, bleach, and ammonia.
To test pH, you can use a digital pH meter, or a pH measurement kit with drops. Opinions here differ as to which method is “best”. Some prefer digital pH meters because they are accurate and easy to read, while others like the drops as they are super simple and don’t require calibration. Try them both and see which you prefer.
The HI-98107 pHep pH tester provides fast and accurate pH readings. The easy-to-use device is designed for non-technical users, and can help both novice and advanced growers measure water pH.
With these methods, it is just as important that you allow the pH level to fluctuate across the acceptable range to support nutrient uptake. For example, in hydro, calcium and magnesium are mostly absorbed at pH levels above 6, while other nutrients like manganese prefer a slightly lower pH.
The issue with cannabis plants is that they are only able to take up nutrients within a small pH window, which ranges from about 6–7 when growing in soil. If the pH is lower or higher than that, the plant cannot take in nutrients, even if they are present—thus spurring nutrient deficiencies via “nutrient lockout”.
If you grow in soil, the optimal pH level for the root zone is between 6.0 and 7.0. However, there is no set number within this range that is “best”. Instead, it can be good to allow for some natural fluctuation within this window to support optimal nutrient uptake. So as you adjust, try a slightly different reading each time. You can, for example, adjust your pH to 6.2 for one watering, then 6.6 the next. As long as it stays within 6.0–7.0, you should be fine. Soil is also more forgiving when it comes to pH imbalances, but it can only give so much.
Measure the pH after you add any nutrients or amendments as they will change the pH value of your water. After you mix the solution, use the pH meter or drops to test the pH level. If you are growing hydroponically, test a sample from your water reservoir a few minutes after you add your nutrients.
Managing pH level means testing the water or nutrient solution and adjusting it accordingly. This may sound complicated, but it really isn’t.
In the world of gardening, pH both affects and is affected by everything. Indeed, the entire process of growing plants is a study in the physical dance of pH balance.
“When you’re talking about changing your acidity like that, it’s complex. Often, they’re hybrid plants, so they’re not true indicas or sativas,” he adds. “It becomes difficult to start playing with that too much.”
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“To find out how far you can go, push. It is a matter of trial and error and knowing your plants. Make sure you take notes and keep track,” he said. “There’s also early telltale signs you can see if you’re pushing too much.”
However, matching pH to the plant’s natural environment could help promote native characteristics, like terpene profiles.
“When you think of the regions of the world where these plants come from, they’re complete opposites. All the factors would be different,” Hach é says. “Y ou can treat them exactly the same, they’re both marijuana plants, but you could probably be a little more efficient by fine-tuning indicas or sativas.”
Cannabis plants prefer a slightly acidic environment for its roots. Growers using soil as their medium should adjust their pH to a range of 6 to 6.8. For a soilless garden, pH should sit between 5.5 to 6.5.
While many nutrient companies add pH stabilizers to their products, Hach é recommends frequent water testing to ensure pH remains in the ideal range.
To find out what’s right for the strains in your garden, Hach é recommends starting with a low nutrient concentration in the cloning or seed phase of growth. The EC should gradually increase as the plant matures.
The EC should peak about halfway through the flowering stage of growth.
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