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two week old weed plant

Two week old weed plant

The above suggestions predominantly apply to photoperiod strains, as autoflowering cannabis flowers based on age rather than light exposure.

Cannabis growers often start their seedlings in small cups. Later on, when the plants have reached an adequate size, they will “pot-up” to larger containers.
If you plan on pruning, don’t overdo it. Be aware that each pruning can delay the development of your plant for days, if not weeks.

Insects may feed on the leaves, affecting a plant’s ability to retain water and transpire. Other pests may damage the roots or cause additional problems. Any time your plant is sick or infested with insects, it will spend most of its energy defending itself and recovering from damage, which will slow down growth.
What to do about it? Create a light and airy growing medium with good drainage. You can improve poor-draining soil by adding some perlite.
Be aware that some growing media, like coco, increase the risk for a calcium deficiency. If you grow in coco, you should use special coco nutrients and/or regularly add CalMag to your nutrient regimen.
Insects, pests, and disease can cause damage and compromise a plant’s immune system. In a best case scenario, your plant may survive, but you will have poor yields. In the worst case, your plants could die.
When your plant’s roots can’t receive enough oxygen, metabolic functions slow down. In some cases, a lack of oxygen may stop their growth altogether. One common reason for this is overwatering or using substrates with poor drainage.

If your seedling is already in a big container and you don’t want to or can’t move it into a smaller cup, water only a small area around the seedling.

Why is my cannabis plant growing slowly or not at all? Find out the answer to this question and see what you can do to solve it.

Two week old weed plant

Plants will vary in size and appearance depending on a variety of factors: Genetics, soil, lighting, nutrients, temperature, handling, and the elusive “green thumb” factor. As you can imagine, a plant growing outdoors under full sun in June (northern hemisphere) will be a lot bigger at 2 weeks old than a plant growing in a converted computer case running 50 watts of lighting!

One of the most common questions asked by novice growers is “What should my plants look like at x days/weeks old?”
Notice the stunted look to the leaves – they don’t have the length and width of the previous pictured plants, and the color is a pale greenish yellow. In particular, the new growth leaves at the top look wrinkled and “mini”. Hey – this happens! In the wild, this plant would simply be overshadowed by taller neighbors and eventually just fade away. Why did this happen to this plant? My guess is simply that the genetic “roll of the dice” wasn’t particularly kind to this specimen. As this grow progresses, the different traits of each plant will become apparent – it will be very interesting to see how the “daddy” Double Gum plant’s offspring look with both the Afghan Kush mother and Royal Automatic mother plants. And all this under 100 watts – get yer popcorn ready!

In any case, cannabis plants do tend to develop certain physical characteristics at certain times in their life span (first true leaves after 3 – 4 days, alternating nodes after 30+ days of vegetative growth, calyxes and pistils after a week of flowering light schedule, for example). Barring any problems, after two weeks of vegetative growth, you can expect to see a plant with several sets of leaves, and are likely to be able to smell that characteristic “mary jane” smell on your fingers after gently rubbing the leaves.
Next is a picture of a 10-day-old “Royal Queen Seeds Automatic x Double Gum” cross breed. Both of these plants are looking healthy, and have a particularly strong aroma so far:
Here are some shots from our current 100 Watt CFL grow. A two-week old Dinafem Critical + plant. She’s (yes, “she” – this is the only feminized seed in this grow) looking quite healthy and of good size for the humble 100Watt grow. She’s ready for transplantation into the larger final grow pot.
Naturally, anyone putting their time and effort into a project wants to have a point of reference against which to judge their own progress (or that of their pants, in this case). The answer is:
This plant has the same soil, lighting, and music (yes, these plants seem to dig the new QOTSA album…) as the others, it’s just not doing well. The green thumb in me wants to try to save it, but I want to keep this little 100Watt grow under wraps so I can focus on our larger medical grow, so this plant will not make the transplant roster:

Don’t be surprised if your plants leaves alternate between “reaching up” towards the light and “sloping downwards” towards the ground – this is normal. Leaf color will range from an intense, deep green to a light yellow-green or “lime” color. What isn’t normal is yellow leaves with stunted-looking new growth, patches of brown or browned edges, dark spots or a mottled look to the leaves, or leaves curling up into a sort of “taco” shape.

One of the most common questions asked by novice growers is "What should my plants look like at x days/weeks old?" Naturally, anyone putting their time and effort into a project wants to have a point of reference against which to judge their own progress (or that of their pants, in this case). The answer…