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transplanting germinated seeds

Transplanting germinated seeds

Rockwool cubes and blocks are made for hydroponic growers. Start your seedling in a small cube and it couldn’t be easier to transplant later. Simply cut a cube-sized chunk out of a larger block and insert. The process can be repeated with minimal stress to plants.

Many soil and coco growers use cups or small plastic pots as starter containers, typically, anywhere in size from 0.5–5l. Lightly fertilised soil mixed with perlite or coco coir mixed with 30–50% perlite are the most common blended media for seedlings. So long as the base of the container has plenty of drainage holes and the interior can hold the volume of medium required, it can serve as a starter pot. Don’t be afraid to improvise. Poke a few holes in the base of a paper coffee cup with a pin and it becomes a pot.
Cannabis seedlings need to be treated delicately. Mind your marijuana like babies. If seedlings need support, prop them up with a toothpick or a cocktail stick and some soft gardening wire.

Next, make an impression in your large container with another small pot, or the one with the plant in it if you don’t have any others. Make this impression in the medium after you have watered it. This creates a perfect imprint for the transplant.
Don’t wait too long to transplant. Rootbound plants will take time to recover and may be permanently stunted. In general, it takes 7–10 days for a seedling to take root and outgrow small starter pots of 1l or less.
The seedling phase is arguably the most important of the entire cannabis life cycle. Whether you grow from seed or clone, the hands-on part of cultivation begins with seedlings. Transplanting is all important. Get it wrong, and the crop could be lost. Get it right, and grow great ganja with this guide.
Before we go into the specifics, we need to be clear that starting in one medium and switching to another can be hazardous. Keep it simple and keep it consistent. You can’t start seedlings in soil and transplant later into a DWC bucket.
If your final container size is up to 11l, you have the option to sow seeds directly. This is only a viable option when growing from seed. Clones will not take root in such a large container. Initially, seedlings in large pots will grow more slowly than those in smaller containers. After a few weeks of vegetative growth, the difference is negligible.

Unfortunately, rockwool is a really bad idea for soil growers, even the smaller sized blocks. Invariably, the block retains more water than the surrounding soil. Green, sludge-like algae growth soon becomes a problem. Sure, sometimes you can get away with the tiny cubes, but why take the risk?

Transplanting seedlings is a critical stage in the cannabis life cycle. Get your grow off to a great start with our guide to transplanting.

Transplanting germinated seeds

Support the seedling upright by its topmost leaves. Fill in around it with potting soil, gently firming the soil with your fingertips. Plant the seedling so it’s growing at the same depth it was at previously.

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Dig a planting hole for each seedling in a prepared garden bed after hardening the plants. Make the holes the same depth as the seedling pots but twice as wide. Space the holes appropriately for the plant varieties.

Set the seedlings outdoors in a protected area with bright, indirect sun after frost danger has passed. Gradually increase the seedlings’ exposure to the sun over a week-long period, but bring them indoors if frost is expected. This process hardens plants so they can better adjust to outdoor conditions.
Seedlings require more space as they continue to grow larger.
Fill 3- to 4-inch-diameter pots two-thirds full with sterile potting soil. Water the soil until it’s evenly moist. Allow the excess water to drain from the bottom drainage holes in the containers before transplanting.
Water the soil lightly to settle it. Set the repotted seedlings in an area that receives six or more hours of daily sun. Water them when the soil surface begins to dry.
Sprouting your seedlings indoors gives plants an early start on the growing season, which helps them reach their flowering or fruiting stage earlier in the summer. Small seeds can be sprouted in trays, and these may require transplanting to individual pots so they have room to develop healthy roots. When the seedlings are six to eight weeks old, you’ll need to transplant them to the garden bed. Handling and transplanting properly prevents plant damage and improves the survival rate of these tender young plants.

Scoop the seedlings from the growing tray with a small spoon, taking care not to damage the roots. Set each seedling in a prepared pot.

Sprouting your seedlings indoors gives plants an early start on the growing season, which helps them reach their flowering or fruiting stage earlier in the summer. Small seeds can be sprouted in trays, and these may require transplanting to individual pots so they have room to develop healthy roots. When the seedlings …