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sog grow guide

Sog grow guide
Two popular methods of low-stress training that increase yield are sea of green (SOG) and screen of green (ScrOG). Each technique is used very successfully to maximise yield per square metre. Autocorrect might hate them, but cannabis plants love SOG and ScrOG.
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Strain selection plays its part for efficient use of space.
Using the right pots for your SOG or ScrOG garden is super important to ensure the health of your plants and the best possible yields. As a general rule of thumb, you’ll never want to grow using pots of less than 3–4 litres, but keep reading for a more detailed look at what pots to use for SOG and SCROG.
When growing 9–12 plants per m², you’ll be restricted to using pots with a diameter of between 20–30cm, which typically have a capacity of 7–11 litres. Using pots of this size is fine, but keep in mind that you’ll only be able to veg your clones for about 8 weeks without them becoming rootbound and stressed from the lack of space. If you want to keep your plants vegging for longer, you’ll need to invest in larger pots.
Both of these low-stress training techniques have proven to be very successful for the domestic and commercial cannabis grower. They each have their advantages and make the most of the grow space on offer. Experimenting with both of these techniques will let you decide which one best suits your style.
Screen of green is a plant training method with the same goals as SOG—to increase the yield per square metre at harvest time as much as possible. Larger pots are used to accommodate larger root zones for larger plants. Many flower sights are encouraged by bending and holding new growth horizontally. Even light distribution over a literal screen of green fills an entire grow room with fewer plants that have an abundance of homogeneously sized flowers.
SOG: Plants with few lateral branches are encouraged to grow a single predominant cola. Plants don’t require training and require little attention besides regular plant upkeep. Less time is spent per week training—as you would with larger plants—for similar end results.
Sea of green is a cannabis manipulation technique that utilises many small plants in small pots for every square metre of space. The advantage of growing with this method is plants spend less time in vegetation, while still producing as many bud sites per volume of space. With SOG grows, buds are ready sooner, which can result in an extra crop per year.
Before we can switch our attention to the flowering or bloom phase, we have to make sure that we have raised large, healthy ladies during as short a growth or 'veg' period as possible
Sog grow guide
Proper care is everything when it comes to successful SOG cultivation. All the plants must be treated equally. This applies to the lighting and supply of nutrients, as well as watering and pruning. Drip systems have proven useful, because they ensure that all plants receive the same quantities of water and nutrients.
If you then change the light cycle to 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness, the plants will devote all their energy to creating one main bud. Now is the time to check that the light sources are hanging high enough to avoid creating any hot spots. Incorrectly placing the lamps is one of the most common errors in the cultivation of cannabis.
Once the plants begin to grow visibly and the first leaves have appeared, then the seedling phase is over.
Opinions differ as to how long the vegetation phase should last. There are growers who trigger the flowering phase after just a few days, but it is better to wait 10 to 14 days before doing so. The plants are still very young at this point.
It is better if the plants do not initially touch each other. The ideal timing for a Sea of Green is not during the first one or two weeks of the vegetation phase, but instead from about the fourth week of the bud formation.
If you prefer to use cannabis seeds, then make sure they are all of the same variety. Sativas tend to grow too lanky and would impinge on the other plants, but Indicas are more suitable.
This approach to cultivation uses a lot of small plants, instead of a few large plants. The growth phase is deliberately kept short, so that the space is completely filled and the light efficiency can be maximised.
A common mistake is to assume that the pots need to be placed as close together as possible. This creates a seamless plant surface area, which initially sounds like a great idea. But what this actually means is that the plants are competing directly with each other, with the result that they try to outgrow each other. This “jungle effect” causes stress for the plants, which in turn leads to less biomass or less bud formation.
Anyone living in a small apartment, or working with a Micro Grow Setup, will understand the benefits offered by only needing a small vertical space. Experienced growers can even use shelves to stack several growing levels on top of each other.
The Sea of Green (SOG) method: No other cultivation method leads to such a rapid cannabis harvest. It takes many, small plants, little space, proper care and following the useful tips in this article! Learn which cannabis varieties to use best and how to avoid the most common mistakes.