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sober up from weed

Sober up from weed

And just to make sure your marijuana high doesn’t go overboard in the future, make note of what and how much you consumed, and next time, practice moderation.

A number of common anti-inflammatory drugs, such as the widely used ibuprofen, has been shown to tame marijuana’s buzz. Sobering up by mixing ibuprofen and weed can be an effective, over-the-counter solution for how to kill your high . In a 2013 animal study conducted by researchers from the University of Louisiana’s School of Medicine, the team found that certain types of anti-inflammatory medication appeared to counteract the stoned effect of cannabis and reduce negative effects on cognition.
More research is needed to reaffirm the synergistic effects of CBD and THC, but integrating some CBD oil or a high-CBD strain into your next smoke session could be an effective remedy for an unwanted buzz.

Unfortunately, smoking yourself sober is not an option. Instead, the first and perhaps not-so-obvious step is to stop smoking if you feel uncomfortable after consuming cannabis. It’s also crucial to be overly cautious when ingesting edibles, as the full effects can take several hours to kick in and tend to pack a powerful punch. If you’re wondering what to do when too high on flower, edibles, or concentrate, here are some quick tips to show you how to come down from a high that gets too intense.
Though marijuana has medical and therapeutic uses, including reducing anxiety, smoking copious amounts of potent weed can send a consumer into a tailspin fraught with anxiety and paranoia. (Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps)
By shifting your attention from how high you are to an enjoyable activity, you’ll probably be able to shed that uncomfortable marijuana high in no time. (Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps)
Some people also find relief from eating a snack, drinking orange juice, or munching out on the entire contents of the refrigerator. However, be cautious about what kind of juice or drink flavor you choose, because mangoes contain the terpenoid myrcene, which has shown the ability to enhance and prolong the effects of THC.
Decades of research have shown that cannabidiol (CBD), a non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant, can reduce THC-induced anxiety and paranoia. In a February 1982 study published in Psychopharmacology, researchers examined whether CBD could reduce anxiety from THC. The study concluded that CBD “might be involved in the antagonism of effects between the two cannabinoids.” A more recent study , published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology on Jan. 27, 2013, also found that when CBD was consumed alongside THC, it appeared to lessen the adverse effects of anxiety and paranoia.

Terpenes are the aromatic oils that give each cannabis plant its own distinct smell, flavor, and effects. The same way that CBD and THC combine to create an “entourage effect,” the variety of terpenoids found in cannabis and other plants seem to have a synergistic relationship with the other cannabis compounds. A citrusy terpene called limonene, which is found in the rinds of citrus fruits and in certain strains of cannabis, has demonstrated the ability to reduce anxiety. A 2012 study into this terpene found that it produced anxiety-reducing or “anxiolytic-like effects,” which could translate positively into a treatment for cannabis-induced anxiety.

Too High? How to Sober up From Weed Even the most seasoned cannabis enthusiast has a story about that time they overdid it and scrambled to find out how to sober up from weed . Though marijuana

Sober up from weed

If you can’t turn your brain off, sometimes a change of scenery and some fresh air to get your blood pumping will help invigorate you. Just remember to stay close to your immediate surroundings—we don’t want you wandering off and getting lost while you’re feeling anxious and paranoid! And refrain from taking a walk if you’re feeling too woozy or light-headed to stand; instead, we recommend Option #5 and lay down for a while.

Water, water, water—don’t forget to hydrate! Whether you prefer water or juice, make sure you have a nice, cold beverage on hand (preferably non-caffeinated). This will help you combat dry mouth and allow you to focus on a simple and familiar act—sipping and swallowing.
All of the activities that seem so entertaining and fun while high are also a great way to distract yourself while you try to come back down to Earth. Some suggestions include:

Sometimes sleeping it off can be the best alternative to stopping a strong high, but it’s not always easy to turn your brain off. Once you’ve found a quiet area, lay down and let yourself relax. If drowsiness and sleep are quick to onset, take a little nap to rejuvenate yourself. Should you be unable to fall asleep, just get comfortable until you feel strong enough to spring back up.
Find a calm, quiet place where you can rest and breathe deeply. Remember, the intense discomfort you’re feeling will pass. Take deep full breaths in through your nose and out through your mouth. Focus on the sound of your breath and just rest a while.
Also, contrary to what you may have heard, there have been zero reported cannabis overdose deaths in the history of ever, so despite how freaked out you may feel or how sweaty you get, you won’t expire from excessive consumption. (Don’t take that on as a challenge, just keep in mind that if you accidentally overdo it, you’ll be OK in a while.)
Take it slow, especially when consuming edibles. We recommend trying a standard dose of 10 mg (or even 5 mg if you really want to ease into the experience) and waiting at least an hour, if not two, before increasing your edibles dosage. The same goes for inhalation methods—if you’re used to occasionally taking one hit off your personal vaporizer, we advise not sitting in a smoking circle puffing and passing for an hour.
Consume with friends you know and are comfortable with, and don’t feel pressured to consume more than you can handle. It’s all well and good to make new friends, but being surrounded by strangers when you can’t feel your face is unpleasant at best and anxiety-ridden at worst.

If all of these suggestions fail and you find that you are still feeling alarmingly uncomfortable, you can always seek medical attention and tell a doctor or nurse that you are having a cannabis-induced anxiety attack. This option is always available, even in states where cannabis is illegal. From a medical perspective, physicians have your best interest in mind and want to do all they can to make sure you’re OK, even if it’s helping you come down when you’re too stoned.

Learn how to sober up from eating too much edible or smoking too much weed.