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smoking weed for first time

US weed prohibition laws have changed in spurts since Oregon first decriminalized the plant in 1973, so they’re inconsistent state-by-state, Johnson explains. The federal government still considers cannabis to be a Schedule 1 drug, even though eight states and Washington D.C. say it’s legal for recreation and 30 for medical use. Legalization doesn’t mean everyone can buy, smoke, or grow on a whim. In California, for example, it’s illegal for anyone under 21 to buy weed. Even those of age can only purchase an ounce per day of flower and eight grams of concentrated oil. Johnson advises looking up whether your state has laws against certain types of paraphernalia, as well.

Pick the right spot to get high. Location can be the difference between a great experience and an awful one. Even seasoned cannabis users can get lost in the mountains or ground an aircraft by getting high in the wrong place or at the wrong time.
If the above hasn’t seen you abandon the quest, the first step to getting high is finding a reliable connect. Tony Greenhand, an artist who makes a living selling custom smokeable sculptures and who rolled a joint that was at one point the largest in the world, recommends finding the highest quality bud possible for your first experience. “It can be tempting to buy a cheaper or weaker alternative,” he said in an email, but that’s a rookie move. “More often than not, a cheaper option has had something go wrong in the growing process or curing process. This is most true of weed found on the black market. A cheaper black market option may contain pesticides, mold, bugs or debris.”

Brandon L. Wyatt, Esq., an army veteran and Howard University School of Law alum who serves on the board of the Minority Cannabis Business Association, points out that the ramifications of getting caught can go beyond fines and jail time. “Cannabis use can have an effect on your federal entitlements,” he tells VICE. For example, you can be evicted from a public housing project or military barracks for possessing cannabis, even if you have a medical card. Private landlords and employers also reserve the right to evict residents or fire employees for consuming cannabis, even in states where it’s legal.
Congratulations! You’ve gotten stoned. Now it’s time to have fun. Most pleasures of the body and mind are enhanced when you’re loopy, so prepare a suite of activities in advance. “You’re going to want to eat and drink, so go shopping BEFORE you smoke to prevent buying a five pound bag of gummy bears,” warns Greenhand. There are dozens of TV shows, movies, music, and video games that are tailor-made to appeal to stoners. “But when you’re high, you’ll see time will fly by. You’ll enjoy simple things, making it pretty easy to stay entertained.”
In states where recreational cannabis isn’t legal, understanding the different patterns of enforcement is key. Earlier this month, New York City stopped arresting people for smoking weed in public, opting instead for a court summons and a $100 fine. Statistics also show that cops treat cannabis possession very differently depending on race. The ACLU reports cannabis use is “roughly equal among Blacks and whites, yet blacks are 3.73 times as likely to be arrested” for possession.
When buying the not-so-legal stuff, it’s important to find a safe, honest and competent dealer. Ask around and find one who is trusted by people you trust. Whether you’re at a dispensary, buying from a neighborhood dealer, you can vet weed from someone you don’t know with a few simple questions. Greenhand says you shouldn’t be afraid to ask the name of the strain, where it was grown, and if it has been tested for mold and pesticides. The most important thing is that the person supplying the drugs is dependable.
Despite the persistent march toward legalization, about 87 percent of weed in North America was purchased on the black market, according to a 2016 survey. That means most of cannabis culture looks different based on the rules and regulations implemented by different states. Whether buying from an authorized dispensary or a friend’s cousin’s weed guy, there are real risks that come with your first experience with pot. They range from simply getting ripped off with weak product to health issues to serious punishment. Here are a few tips that will keep you safe, happy, and maximize your enjoyment.

If you’ve gotten too stoned, you may experience hallucinations, nausea, paranoia. The first thing to do is not call 911. Then, breathe. Greenhand’s strategies for lessening an overpowering high are eating a big meal, exercising, and if all else fails, crawling into bed and going to sleep.

Don't start with edibles.

– Your senses become heightened, and inputs like color, light, and sound all take on a stronger or at least different quality.

7. You worry (probably).
Let’s dive into it.

Profundity – whether real or imagined – is a central theme of weed smoking. Embrace it. These are the realizations that will at most make you wiser, and at least make you laugh a lot.
Newbies worry that “people know” they’re high. They worry that their eyes are red, or that they smell like smoke. They worry about getting in conversations with people who aren’t stoned. These kinds of concerns tend to fall short of paranoia, but the worry is still there.
– You enjoy a euphoric, uplifted feeling.
2 .You get really, really high – in a good way.
4. Time gets tricky.

If you experience any of these things, the important thing to keep in mind is that they will go away shortly, and that you can usually solve them by changing your circumstances, i.e., moving locations, putting on music, finding something funny to watch, going for a walk, or whatnot.

First-timers have the same questions: How long will the high last? Will I get paranoid? Are munchies real? Learn about what to expect when smoking weed for the first time before you roll up.