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skunk dream

Dreaming of this animal can represent:

  • Personal meaning – What the dream symbol means to you, what it reminds you of, how it makes you feel.
  • Context – How the dream symbol appears in the dream. For example, in a dream about a bee – what was the bee doing, how and where it was doing it, and how did you feel about it?
  • Look beyond the obvious – A dream is often about something other than its obvious meaning. Physical events in the dream commonly represent mental or emotional matters.

Being sprayed by a skunk can mean feel or fear aggression or accusation from someone else in your life.
Dream symbol meanings are different for each person. It’s IMPORTANT to consider:
For more clues, pay attention to what the animal was doing or any particular characteristic that stood out.

  • Havingtoo much of one of these qualities, or that you could benefit by being less this way
  • Not having enough of one of these qualities, or that you could benefit by being more like this
  • Someone or something in your real life with whom you associate one of these qualities (an event, situation, threat, etc.)

This dream dictionary gives suggested meanings of dream symbols. A dream symbol often means something different in different dreams. There is no standard meaning of a dream symbol or dream that is accurate for all dreams. Dream meaning is very subjective, and your dream symbol may mean something completely different from the meaning listed in this dream dictionary.

  • Suppressed anger, protective or aggressive anger if the skunk is spraying
  • “Something stinks” in your life
  • Self-confidence or feeling self-secure

IMPORTANT: This dream dictionary gives suggested meanings of dream symbols. There is no single “standard meaning” of a dream symbol or dream. Dream meaning is very subjective, and your dream symbol may mean something completely different from the meaning listed in this dream dictionary. I am not a therapist. If you are experiencing physical or psychological problems, or if you are distressed, consult a medical professional.
Dream Symbol: skunk Suppressed anger, protective or aggressive anger if the skunk is spraying “Something stinks” in your life Self-confidence or feeling self-secure
“Its ripe odor must have dissipated in the frozen earth of its winterlong hibernation, because it didn’t smell all that bad, or perhaps it was just that I took shallow breaths in numb surprise. I felt him — her, whatever — pause on the side of my hip and turn around twice before evidently deciding I was a good place to sleep. At the back of my knees, on the quilting of my sleeping bag, it trod out a spot for itself and then, with a serene little groan, curled up and lay perfectly still. That made two of us. I was wildly awake, trying to forget the sharpness and number of skunk teeth, trying not to think of the high percentage of skunks with rabies, or the reason that on camping trips my father kept a hatchet underneath his pillow.
The images here are from Roux’s “Woodland Wardens” series, an oracle deck in progress. (I hope it’s completed and published soon.) For those of you in or near Tennessee, the series can be viewed in the Jessica Roux exhibition at Gallery 205 in Columbia through Dec. 1st.
“I woke at dawn, stunned into that sprayed state of being. The dog that had approached me was rolling the grass, half-addled, sprayed too. The skunk was gone. I abandoned my sleeping bag and started home. Up Eighth Street, past the tiny blue and pink houses, past my grade school, past all the addresses where I had baby-sat, I walked in my own strange wind. The streets were wide and empty; I met no one — not a dog, not a squirrel, not even an early robin. Perhaps they had all scattered before me, blocks away. I had gone out to sleep on the football field because I was afflicted with a sadness I had to dramatize. Mood swings had begun, hormones, feverish and brutal. They were nothing to me now. My emotions seemed vast, dark, and sickeningly private. But they were minor, mere wisps, compared to skunk.”
The art today is by Jessica Roux, an American painter whose work is rich in carefully-observed flora and fauna. Raised in the woodlands of North Carolina, Roux studied at the Savannah College of Art & Design in Georgia, and now works as a freelance illustrator and stationary designer.
“Of what easily tipped cans, what molten sludge, what dogs in back yards, what leftover macaroni casseroles, what cellar holes, crawl spaces, burrows taken from meek woodchucks, of what miracles of garbage did my skunk dream? Or did it, since we can’t be sure, dream the plot of Moby Dick, how to properly age parmesan, or how to restore the brick-walled, tumbledown creamery that was its home? We don’t know about the dreams of any other biota, and even much about our own. If dreams are an actual dimesion, as some assert, then the usual rules of life by which we abide do not apply. In that place, skunks may certainly dream themselves into the vests of stockbrokers. Perhaps that night the skunk and I dreamed each other’s thoughts, or are still dreaming them. To paraphrase the problem of the Chinese sage, I may be a woman who has dreamed herself a skunk, or a skunk still dreaming she is a woman.
“Skunks don’t mind each other’s vile perfume. Obviously they find each other more than tolerable. And even I, who have been in the direct presence of a skunk hit, wouldn’t classify their weapon as mere smell. It is more on the order of a reality-enhancing experience. It’s not so pleasant as standing in a grove of old-growth red cedars, or watching trout rise to the shadow of your hand on the placid surface of an Alpine lake. When the skunk lets go, you are surrounded by skunk presence: inhabited, owned, involved with something you can only describe as powerfully there.
“I can’t get enough of history,” she says. “Old lithographs and studies by early naturalists are some of my favorite things. I love medieval bestiaries and the early Northern Renaissance. I’m also really inspired by nature. There are just so many strange plants and animals out there that I want to know more about.”
I’m sure I was not the only child who dreamed of sleeping with wild animals, although the closest I’ve come to that Jungle Book fantasy is to curl up with Tilly snoring beside me. The reality of animal life in the wild is different than fantasy tales of course — as Louise Erdrich reminds us in this passage from her essay “Skunk Dreams”:
“When I was fourteen, I slept alone on a North Dakota football field under the cold stars on an early spring night. May is unpredictable in the Red River Valley, and I happened to hit a night when frost formed in the grass. A skunk trailed a plume of steam across the forty-yard line near moonrise. I tucked the top of my sleeping bag over my head and was just dosing off when the skunk walked onto me with simple authority.
I’m sure I was not the only child who dreamed of sleeping with wild animals, although the closest I’ve come to that Jungle Book fantasy is to curl up with Tilly snoring beside me. The reality of animal life in…