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si so

Si so

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Si can be used as an intensifier:
The French word si can be an adverb or a conjunction. Either way, si has several meanings and is used in numerous French constructions. Practicing the use of this word is important for grasping its nuances.

Si can put two clauses in opposition:
Si means “yes” in response to a negative question or statement:
Si can make a comparison:
If someone asks a question and you’re not sure (or can’t believe) you heard correctly, you can request confirmation or clarification by repeating what you did hear with the word si:
Si j’ai faim?
(Are you asking) if I’m hungry?
(You couldn’t really hear the question)
Si je veux quoi?
You’re asking if I want what?
(You’re not sure you heard correctly; you heard “Do you want a free TV?”)
Si j’ai combien d’enfants?
You’re asking if I have how many kids?
(You didn’t hear “how many,” or you heard “Do you have 7 kids?”)
Si can be followed by a subjunctive clause to express a concession:

Si is the French word for “if”:

The French word si can be an adverb or a conjunction. Either way, si has several meanings and is used in numerous French constructions.