Seed Weed Fertilizer

Knowing what kind of nutrients and fertilizer to feed your cannabis plants is crucial. Learn about nutrient and fertilizer best practices from the experts at Leafly. Today we're going to talk about when to start using fertilizers with cannabis; depending on the phase your plant is in it will need certain nutrients. WHAT IS IT? Weed seeds = Elevator Screenings are what is left when grain is run through a seed cleaner. Clean grain goes into a bin and residues = screenings are disposed. Most grain elevators give weed seeds away free to any farmer willing to haul them. Some elevators charge nominal sums for screenings because…

How to use nutrients and fertilizers to grow marijuana plants

A cannabis plant needs many nutrients, and pulls these from the soil. Left on its own, with good soil, plenty of light and water, and a temperate environment, a weed plant will grow fine, but nutrients will help the plant thrive and grow healthy and strong.

What are cannabis nutrients?

Growing high-quality weed requires more nutrients, or fertilizer, than most common crops.

Outdoor cannabis growers typically add powdered nutrients to soil when transplanting a weed plant outside. This will give the plant all or most of the nutrients it needs for its entire life cycle, and if you want to add more nutrients to plants later, you can add them to the top of soil—called “top dressing.”

Indoor growers typically use liquid nutrients and mix them in with water before watering plants. Using liquid nutrients is usually more time consuming, as you typically have to measure and mix them in water 1-2 times a week.

We recommend not using nutrients made for indoor growing for outdoor plants, as they are usually composed of synthetic mineral salts and can damage soil bacteria.

What nutrients does a cannabis plant need?

Your marijuana plants need the following primary nutrients, collectively known as macronutrients:

  • Nitrogen (N)
  • Phosphorus (P)
  • Potassium (K)

These micronutrients are needed as well, but in much smaller quantities:

  • Calcium (Ca)
  • Magnesium (Ma)
  • Sulfur (S)

Other micronutrients that occur in very small amounts and that you don’t hear about as much include: boron, chlorine, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc.

Additionally, cannabis plants derive these non-mineral elements from air and water:

Cannabis plants need different amounts of these nutrients throughout the different stages of growth: more nitrogen during vegetative growth, and more phosphorus and potassium during flower for bud production—also called “bloom” nutrients.

Nitrogen

Nitrogen is mainly responsible for a cannabis plant’s development during the vegetative stage of its life. It’s an essential part of chlorophyll and without it, a plant can’t turn sunlight into energy and it won’t be able to grow.

Nitrogen is also part of amino acids that act as building blocks for proteins in a plant. Without the necessary proteins, your cannabis plants will be weak and frail. Nitrogen is also a part of ATP, which allows plant cells to control the use of energy.

Nitrogen is also necessary to create nucleic acid, an essential ingredient in DNA or RNA, and without it, cells won’t be able to grow and multiply.

Phosphorus

Phosphorus is important for producing large, healthy buds. The key role of this element is to help make nutrients available for the plant to uptake. These nutrients are used to build the structure of a plant as it grows from its roots to its flowers.

Without adequate phosphorus, marijuana plants will show signs of undeveloped roots and might not even flower. Early signs of phosphorus deficiency shows up as a purple hue in the veins of leaves.

Potassium

Potassium has a number of jobs that largely help regulate the systems that keep a plant healthy and growing. It plays a large role in osmoregulation, the passive regulation of water and salt concentrations in the plant. Potassium accomplishes this by controlling the opening and closing of the stomata—the pores in the leaves—which is how a plant exchanges CO2, H2O, and oxygen.

Potassium also triggers the production of ATP, which works to store energy produced in photosynthesis by creating glucose. This glucose is then used as energy for the plant as it grows. Without sufficient potassium, you will see weak plants starved for energy that appear burnt because they are unable to successfully regulate the exchange of CO2, H2O, and oxygen.

Calcium

Calcium is responsible for keeping the structure of cell walls in a plant together. Without calcium, new growth won’t develop properly and the plant won’t function as it should. New growth will be stunted, leaves will curl, and rusty spots will show up on the plant.

Magnesium

Magnesium acts as the central molecule in chlorophyll and without it, plants aren’t able to generate the glucose from photosynthesis. No magnesium means no energy can be converted from sunlight.

Once magnesium has helped create glucose, it helps metabolize glucose to make it available for the plant to grow. Without sufficient magnesium, you will find yellowing leaves, with discoloration reaching the veins as well.

How to use and mix cannabis nutrients

Nutrient solution bottles and fertilizer bags will indicate how much of the three main nutrients are in the product, in the form of N-P-K: Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, For example, a product that says “10-4-4” will contain 10% available nitrogen, 4% phosphorus, and 4% potassium by weight.

A general rule of thumb is that a vegetative fertilizer should have high nitrogen, low phosphorus, and moderate potassium: for example, 9-4-5. As a plant transitions into flower, taper off the nitrogen and focus on phosphorus and potassium—seek a ratio around 3-8-7, for example.

Products are also generally divided into “grow” solutions, high in nitrogen needed for vegetative growth, and “bloom” solutions, high in phosphorus for flower development. You can stick to these general terms if you don’t want to get bogged down with numbers.

In the final week or so before harvest, be sure to give your plants only water to clear any nutrient buildup in the buds—this is called flushing.

Liquid nutrients

Liquid nutrients are typically used for indoor growing, but can be used outdoors too. Liquid nutrients are used for weed plants in soil, hydroponics, and other grow media, and can be pushed through drip lines, misters, and hoses for easy and efficient delivery.

Because liquid nutrients are readily available to a cannabis plant’s roots, they are fast-acting, meaning they can damage plants if you feed them too much.

To use liquid nutrients, you’ll need a separate water tank, such as a dedicated garbage bin, to mix them into water. You’ll also need to know how much water is needed for all your plants. Depending on the amount of water you need, add the correct ratio of liquid nutrients according to the bottle’s directions.

When using liquid nutrients for cannabis plants, it’s important to have a watering schedule to write down and track:

  • How much water you use
  • How many and what kind of nutrients you use
  • How frequently you water
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You don’t want to use liquid nutrients every time you water—use them every other watering, or two waterings on, one off. It depends on the complexity of your soil and the health of your plants. Too many nutrients will damage your plants.

Giving weed plants the proper amount of nutrients requires careful monitoring. Many growers start at a solution dose lower than recommended and work their way up until plants respond optimally. Too little nutrients and the plants will have stunted growth, while too many can lead to nutrient burn and lockout.

Check your pH

It’s important to get a pH meter to check the pH level of your water when mixing nutrients. Cannabis prefers a pH between 6 and 7 in soil, and between 5.5 and 6.5 in hydroponic media. Letting the pH get out of this range can lead to nutrient lockout, meaning your plants are unable to absorb the nutrients they need, so be sure to test your water regularly and make sure the nutrient mix you give plants falls within the desired range.

Comparing nutrient and fertilizer brands

There are many different cannabis nutrients out there and it may be overwhelming knowing where to start. Here’s a breakdown on some of our favorites.

General Hydroponics Their Micro, Grow, and Bloom are gold standards in nutrients, and great for beginners and pros alike.
Botanicare Another solid nutrient provider, their Grow and Bloom formulas keep things simple and plants happy.
Dyna-Gro Their Pro-TeKt is great for adding to plants during flowering.

Organic cannabis fertilizers

Organic fertilizers are nutrients that come from organic sources such as animal and vegetable waste. They also include sediments like glacial rock dust and gypsum that contain beneficial minerals for the soil and plant. They are common for outdoor growing and usually come in powder form.

Organic fertilizers and nutrients can be more forgiving than liquid nutrients. They usually contain less immediately soluble nutrients and more elements that are beneficial to soil organisms.

Most of these fertilizers can be purchased cheaply at your local nursery and then mixed into soil before potting outdoors. Done correctly, you’ll only need to water your plants throughout the growing process, as all nutrients are in the soil.

We recommend these organic fertilizers:

  • Nitrogen: Worm casings, blood meal, fish meal, bat guano
  • Phosphorus: Bone meal, rock dust
  • Potassium: Wood ash, kelp meal
  • Calcium and magnesium: Dolomite lime

Commercial soil blends also exist that already contain the proper mix of these nutrients.

Benefits of organic fertilizers for cannabis plants

One of the best things about organic fertilizers is they improve the soil while also improving the quality of your plants. Other benefits:

  • The slow release of nutrients protects plants from too many nutrients
  • Over time, organic fertilizers will improve the quality and diversity of life in soil
  • Improved airflow and water retention in soil
  • Renewable and sustainable
  • Organics stay in the soil with a lower chance of nutrient run-off

Some growers also find that growing organically increases the flavor profile of finished cannabis as well as increases yields.

The fertilization process can repeat itself year after year as the soil continually improves—next year, your soil will be even better than this year’s.

Using organics is also great if you want to be more in-tune with your natural environment. Organic fertilizers are readily available from renewable sources and are an earth friendly option.

Disadvantages of organic nutrients for cannabis plants

There are some complications in working with organic fertilizers. The main issue is if your weed plants have a nutrient deficiency, it takes longer for a plant to absorb organic powder nutrients, which can increase the damage to plants. Liquid nutrients act much quicker. Other disadvantages:

  • They take time to be absorbed by the plant
  • Require microorganisms to break down nutrients, which may slow in colder temperatures
  • Can introduce insects and pests

How to make compost tea for marijuana plants

Compost is filled with beneficial microorganisms and nutrients, and you can take it one step further by steeping it in aerated water. This process, called “compost tea,” extracts the microorganisms and soluble nutrients into a water “tea” solution.

The goal of compost tea is to introduce nutrients, fungal colonies, and beneficial bacteria to either the soil or foliage of a marijuana plant to aid growth and protect it from harmful disease, promoting bigger, stronger, and more resilient plants.

Compost tea should never be a 100% replacement for nutrients, but it can be a great complement to other nutrients.

You can add compost tea to weed plants by:

  • Spraying it on leaves
  • Applying it to soil

When applied to soil, you’re adding to the soil food web by introducing a healthy population of microorganisms that are aerobic in nature. These organisms hold nutrients, aerate soil, aid water retention, increase nutrient absorption in the cannabis plant, help grow healthy roots, and help prevent diseases.

However, the benefits of compost tea are debated in the agricultural world. Many gardeners report quality results when using it, while others see no more benefit than applying straight compost. The uncertainty lies in whether or not growing and developing populations of microorganisms in the tea can actually benefit plants and prevent disease.

Compost tea recipe for marijuana plants

A healthy compost tea pulls soluble nutrients and microorganisms from compost, including bacteria, fungi, and protozoa.

Here are five key compost tea ingredients recommended by the Beneficial Living Center located in Arcata, California, to create a successful tea that will work best for your cannabis.

  • Compost: A healthy compost should have large populations of microorganisms and nutrients, and sourcing it locally will ensure organisms are local pathogens. Compost that contains developed mycelium (fungal colonies) populations will help aid the development of fungal growth in the tea.
  • Worm Castings: These byproducts expelled from a worm after digestion provide a high density of nutrients in a broken-down, refined form readily available for plants. Worm castings also introduce microorganisms.
  • Fish Hydrolysate: This is produced by breaking down fish and crustaceans to create a nitrogen-dense product. Crustacean exoskeletons also have chitin, which works as an immune booster for plants. Fish hydrolysate also helps feed and increase fungi populations.
  • Kelp: This serves as a source of food for fungi that grow while the tea is brewing. It’s also thought to provide a surface for fungal colonies to attach to and develop.
  • Molasses: Serves as a source of food for bacteria that grow while the tea is brewing.

How to make compost tea in 5 steps

Build a compost tea brewer

Before building a compost tea brewer, you need to consider the size of your cannabis garden. Most homegrows use 5-gallon buckets. On the outside of the bucket, you’ll need to have an air pump connected to an aerator device at the bottom. The aerator and air pump will oxygenate water so microorganisms can breathe.

You’ll also need a 400-micron mesh bag to place ingredients for the tea. While you can buy pre-built tea brewers, you can also easily make your own for cheap.

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Build your schedule

Tea brewing takes time, so it’s important to figure out when you want to apply the tea. Most teas generally take 24-36 hours to brew. You don’t want to let your tea brew for too long because the microorganism populations will develop to a point where they won’t have enough oxygen or space to live, and will begin to die, which can damage your tea.

Only start a tea when you can apply it within 36 hours of brewing it. When using as a spray, apply in the evening or morning when the temperature is low and without direct sunlight. This period is also when the stomata—pores in the plant’s foliage—are open to receive nutrients.

Fill your compost tea bag

When creating a first batch of tea, keep the solution simple. If you use city water, allow it to sit and breathe so chlorine can break down. Once your tea is brewing, keep it out of direct sunlight and make sure the air pump is running and oxygen is being pushed through the water.

Finalize your compost tea

There are multiple products that can be added in the middle of your brewing process, toward the end, or right before application: Food for bacteria and fungi can be added halfway through the brewing process to increase the growth of microorganisms; products like SeaGreen and Actinovate can be added before the tea is applied to plants for additional benefits.

Applying compost tea on cannabis

The tea can be applied to roots or as a spray on leaves of your cannabis plants. Dilute the tea with water at a ratio around 1:20 when applying it to roots. A basic tea can’t harm or burn your plants, so you can apply a potent dose freely. As a foliar spray, compost tea is generally diluted with water at a 1:2 ratio.

Don’t put compost tea through drip irrigation lines because it will clog them up over time. It’s important to either gravity feed the tea or use a diaphragm pump—as opposed to a centrifugal pump—to avoid chopping up and disrupting the active microorganisms when watering.

When to Start Using Fertilizers with Cannabis

In this article we’re going to talk about when to start using fertilizers with cannabis. People always ask us when they should start using fertilizers on their plants, but honestly it depends on your grow method, the strain and the phase that the plant is in.

Depending on the phase your grow is in your plants are going to need certain nutrients in higher proportions; they need more Nitrogen in growth, and phosphorus and potassium for the flowering period. Cannabis plants absorb large quantities of these nutrients as well as others, so if they don’t get them through irrigation then they’ll probably end up showing deficiencies through stains on the leaves.

To start using nitrogen during the growth phase you’ll need to wait for your little plant to grow the roots out enough so that it becomes slightly stronger. It won’t need much more than some humidity to germinate and grow during the first few days, but once it begins growing aster then you’ll need to start using a growth fertilizer.

You should begin off with small dosages; if your product says 4ml/L for adult plants then you need to start off with 1ml/L, and only begin using it once the leaves on your plant have three points. Once those leaves appear you can start using your growth fertilizer in the irrigation water. Once the plant begins growing more then you should raise the dosage until you reach the maximum milliliters allowed, and always use it with every second watering.

For the rest of the grow, regardless of what products you use, you will need to use them on every second watering or else you’ll burn out the roots. If you notice the plant getting yellow then you can use fertilizers twice in a row, but if it gets a dense dark green color then you’ll need to lay off on the fertilizers for a couple of waterings.

Once the female flowers begin showing then you’ll need to begin using flowering fertilizers. Just like in the growth period, you’ll need to start off little by little until you reach the maximum milliliters stated by the fertilizer manufacturer, alternating between pure water and fertilizers.

Each brand has a different range of products, so depending on the brand you go with you’ll need to use more or less products for both growth and flowering, although in this article we’re just talking about WHEN to use them.

If you buy a product with root stimulants in it then you should use it during the first two growth weeks and for two weeks after every time you transplant. If you have a flowering stimulant then you’ll need to use it once you flip the lights to 12 until the first flowers start appearing.

If your chosen range of liquids has a fattener with a high PK you’ll need to use it during the last phase of the flowering period, the fattening period.

Author: Javier Chinesta
Translation: Ciara Murphy

WEED SEED MEAL FERTILIZER

WHAT IS IT? Weed seeds = Elevator Screenings are what is left when grain is run through a seed cleaner. Clean grain goes into a bin and residues = screenings are disposed. Most grain elevators give weed seeds away free to any farmer willing to haul them. Some elevators charge nominal sums for screenings because they can be fed to animals. For example, 10% to 15% weed seeds can be mixed into chicken feed.

HOW TO MAKE WEED SEED MEAL: Seeds of most plants make good fertilizer. The trick is to mill = grind seeds into a coarse meal or flour so they do not sprout. Most farmers use roller mills, hammer mills, or gristmills to grind weed seeds. If milling equipment is not available weed seeds can be baked in shallow (2 inch ~ 5 centimeter deep) pans at 350 degrees Fahrenheit ~ 176 degrees Centigrade for 1 hour to kill seeds. Baked weed seeds make very slow release organic fertilizer ideal for plants (like roses) sensitive to excess nitrogen.

If weed seeds are not available, substitute any type of waste or spoiled grain, for example, wet or dry brewer’s grains. There is no standard analysis for weed seed meal; nutrient content varies depending on species and proportion which change by locality and season. It is good practice to test weed seed samples yearly so fertilizer application rates can be adjusted as needed.

Below are some average nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K) values for rough calculations. Note: lb = pound. 1 pound = 0.454 kilogram. 1 American ton = 2,000 pounds = 908 kilograms = 0.908 metric ton. 1 metric ton = 1 megagram = 1,000,000 grams = 1,000 kilograms = 2,200 pounds = 1.1 American tons.

WEED SEED MEAL & SIMILAR AGRICULTURAL WASTES. FERTILIZER ANALYSIS IN PERCENT BY WEIGHT (Nitrogen : Phosphorous: Potassium):

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BARLEY (spoiled, dry): 1.75% N : 0.75% P : 0.50% K = 35 lb N + 15 lb P + 10 lb K per ton (Manitoba 2011)

BEANS, SOUP (broken, dry): 4.0% N : 1.20% P : 1.30% K = 80 lb N + 24 lb P + 26 lb K per ton (New York 1988)

BREWER’S GRAINS (dry): 4.53% N : 0.47% P : 0.24% K = 90 lb N + 9 lb P + 4 lb K per ton (Pennsylvania 2012)

BREWER’S GRAINS (wet): 0.90% N : 0.50% P : 0.05% K = 18 lb N + 10 lb P + 1 lb K per ton (Pennsylvania 2012)

CANOLA SEED MEAL: 6% N : 2% P : 1% K = 120 lb N + 40 lb P + 20 lb K per ton (Saskatchewan 2014)

CASTOR BEANS (pressed): 5.5% N : 2.25 % P : 1.125% K = 110 lb N + 45 lb P + 22 lb K per ton (Egypt 2012)

COFFEE GROUNDS (dry): 2.0% N : 0.35% P : 0.52% K = 40 lb N + 7 lb P + 10 lb K per ton (Uganda 2015)

CORN, DENT (spoiled, dry): 1.65% N : 0.65% P : 0.40% K = 33 lb N + 13 lb P + 8 lb K per ton (Maryland 2014)

COTTON SEED (whole): 3.15% N : 1.25% P : 1.15% K = 63 lb N + 25 lb P + 23 lb K per ton (USDA 2015)

COTTON SEED (pressed): 4.51% N : 0.64% P : 1.25% K = 90 lb N + 12 lb P + 25 lb K per ton (USDA 2015)

COTTON SEED MEAL: 6.6% N: 1.67% P : 1.55% K = 132 lb N + 33 lb P + 31 lb K per ton (Egypt 2012)

COWPEAS (broken, dry): 3.10% N : 1.00% P : 1.20% K = 62 lb N + 20 lb P + 24 lb K per ton (California 2014)

FLAXSEED = LINSEED MEAL: 5.66% N : 0.87% P : 1.24% K = 113 lb N + 17 lb P + 24 lb K per ton (Manitoba 2008)

OATS (broken, dry): 2.00% N : 0.80% P : 0.60% K = 40 lb N + 16 lb P + 12 lb K per ton (New York 2010)

RICE BRAN: 4.00% N : 3.00% P : 1.00% K = 80 lb N + 60 lb P : 20 lb K per ton (India 2015)

RICE, BROWN (spoiled, dry): 1.0% N : 0.48% P : 0.32% K = 20 lb N + 9 lb P + 6 lb K per ton (California 2016)

RICE HULLS = HUSKS: 1.9% N : 0.48% P : 0.81% K = 38 lb N + 9 lb P + 16 lb K per ton (Philippines 2014)

RICE, WHITE (broken): 1% N : 0.21% P : 0.27% K = 20 lb N + 4 lb P + 5 lb K per ton (California 2016)

SOYBEAN MEAL: 7.0% N : 2.0% P : 0.0% K = 140 lb N + 40 lb P + 0 lb K per ton (Brazil 2011)

WEED SEED MEAL: 2.7% N : 0.90 % P : 0.90% K = 54 lb N + 18 lb P + 18 lb K per ton (Hungary 2013)

WEED SEED MEAL: 3.02% N : 0.56% P : 0.77% K = 60 lb N + 11 lb P + 15 lb K per ton (Saskatchewan 2015)

WHEAT, HARD RED WINTER (broken): 2.00% N : 0.85% P :0.50% K = 40 lb N + 17 lb P + 10 lb K per ton (Kansas 2011)

For comparison, fresh dairy cow manure (86% water) contains 0.60% Nitrogen : 0.15% Phosphorous : 0.45% Potassium = 12 lb N + 3 lb P + 9 lb K per ton. Cow manure is the traditional standard against which all other organic fertilizers are measured.

For slow release fertilizer mill weed seeds into coarse flakes or meal. Grind weed seeds into powder for fast acting fertilizer.

WEED SEED MEAL APPLICATION RATES: Calculate application rates according to soil test recommendation for desired crop. Minimum application rate is 1 ton = 2,000 pounds per acre ~ 5 pounds or 1 gallon per 100 square feet ~ 2 Tablespoons or 2/3 ounce per square foot. Apply 1 pound of weed seed meal for every 25 feet of row or trench. Mix 1/2 to 1 cup of weed seed meal in each bushel (8 gallons) of potting soil.

Average density of weed seed meal = 0.3125 to 0.40 ounce per Tablespoon ~ 5 to 6.5 ounces per cup ~ 20 to 25.6 ounces per quart ~ 80 to 102.4 ounces per gallon ~ 5 pounds to 6 pounds 6.4 ounces per gallon ~ 40 to 51 pounds per bushel (8 gallons). 1 ton = 2,000 pounds weed seed meal = 40 to 50 bushels.

For example: 200 bushel per acre corn crop requires 200 pounds of nitrogen per acre. 200 pounds N divided by 54 pounds of nitrogen per ton of weed seed meal = 3.70 ~ 4 tons of weed seed meal needed per acre of corn. Weed seed meal can be tilled into the earth by conventional plowing, broadcast on soil surface, side banded down rows, or drilled into furrows or trenches.

For feeding earthworms broadcast weed seed meal (1 ton per acre or 2 Tablespoons per square foot) on soil surface. Reapply throughout the growing season when meal is no longer visible.

AGRONOMY NOTES:

–> Weed seed meal is a natural = biological = organic fertilizer that requires decomposition before nutrients are available to plants. Bacteria, fungi and many other soil organisms eat weed seed meal then excrete nutrients in plant available forms. As soil organisms live and die, nutrients are constantly recycled = most fertilizer is tied up in the bodies of soil “critters” and is only available to plant roots in small amounts over extended time periods. Thus, weed seed meal is a slow release fertilizer that will not burn plant roots or leach from the soil.

–> Cold, wet soils delay weed seed meal decomposition. Warm, moist soils speed fertilizer availability. Early season crops may show signs of nitrogen deficiency (light green leaves) if soils are especially cold or poorly aerated = oxygen deficient. This is a temporary condition that will ordinarily correct itself in 2 or 3 weeks. Every 5 degree Fahrenheit temperature increase doubles microbial activity. As soils warm, nutrient cycling speeds up and more fertilizer is released for absorption by plant roots.

–> If crops must be seeded in cold soils, apply weed seed meal 2 to 3 weeks before planting so soil organisms have more time to decompose fertilizer and make nutrients available to plants.

–> Weed seed meal is an indirect fertilizer — it feeds soil organisms rather than plant roots. Large amounts of weed seed meal can be applied without crop damage or nutrient loss because the fertilizer is held by soil biology rather than soil chemistry. Thus, nutrients can be banked = stored for use by following crops. Weed seed meal has a “half-life” of several years. Nutrients are continually released in small amounts long after fertilizer is applied.

–> Weed seed meal works best on soils managed biologically. Chemically managed soils typically have smaller populations of soil organisms. Fewer “critters” slows nutrient cycling and restricts fertilizer absorption by plant roots.

–> To use LIVE weed seeds as fertilizer broadcast seeds into a standing cover crop like Red Clover (Trifolium pratense). Earthworms, ants, beetles and other critters eat the weed seeds. Clover kills any weeds that germinate. Caution: Do not try this unless you have a tall, aggressive cover crop that blankets the soil with dense shade.

RELATED PUBLICATIONS: Crop Rotation Primer; Biblical Agronomy; The Twelve Apostles; Managing Weeds as Cover Crops; Trash Farming; No-Till Hungarian Stock Squash; Planting Maize with Living Mulches; Living Mulches for Weed Control; Organic Herbicides; Pelleted Seed Primer; Crops Among the Weeds; Forage Maize for Soil Improvement; Forage Radish Primer; and Rototiller Primer.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO KNOW MORE? Contact the Author directly if you have any questions or need additional information on fertilizing soils with weed seed meal.

Please visit: http://www.worldagriculturesolutions.com — or — send your questions to: Eric Koperek, Editor, World Agriculture Solutions, 413 Cedar Drive, Moon Township, Pennsylvania, 15108 United States of America — or — send an e-mail to: Eric Koperek = [email protected]

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Mr. Koperek is a plant breeder who farms in Pennsylvania during summer and Florida over winter. (Growing 2 generations yearly speeds development of new crop varieties).