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rid of crickets

Rid of crickets

As you look for the crickets making all that racket, focus on elements that provide cover, as crickets are fond of nesting in dark, moist environments. Check along the perimeter of patios or walkways, for example, or beneath decorative planters. Look, too, under layers of mulch or even in the compost heap.

Attracted by your home’s welcoming lights, crickets seeking shelter may enter through cracks in the foundation or tiny openings around windows or doors. If it’s too late to prevent access by sealing up the building envelope, at least there are several ways to get rid of crickets that have come inside uninvited.
If you are able to locate a nest, there are at least two ways to proceed. One is to cease watering that portion of your property, denying the crickets the water they need to survive. A somewhat more assertive method is to overwater. In either case, the goal is to force the crickets away from their nesting place.

Don’t discount the classic sticky traps and glue boards, but if you’re looking for an easy, low-cost answer, look no further than your kitchen pantry. A jar filled with a 1:10 mixture of molasses and water works remarkably well. Drawn into the jar by the sweet smell, the crickets cannot escape and ultimately drown.
The first and most difficult step is figuring out where the crickets are in the first place. Your best bet is to follow the sound of chirping. Be forewarned that upon your approach, crickets in or near the nest are going to quiet down, thwarting your efforts. Even so, going by ear helps narrow down the search field.
Focus on the yard. Mowing the lawn, weeding plant beds, and removing yard debris—in effect, eliminating common hiding places—all go a long way toward discouraging crickets. In addition, take pains to create some breathing space between the house and its landscaping by pruning back shrubs near your foundation. If you keep a stock of firewood, try to store the logs at least 20 feet away from your home. And don’t forget to clear your gutters; they’re a notorious pest harborage.
The chirping of crickets in the yard: It’s a familiar hallmark of summer, and for plenty of homeowners it’s a pleasant background noise that lends a sultry, evocative ambience to the evening. For others, the sound holds no charm, and if you’re unlucky enough to have a cricket stationed directly beneath your bedroom window, the chirping can quickly become a nightly nuisance. To get rid of crickets, unfortunately, you have to do more than just stand near the back door and shout, “Quiet!” Crickets don’t heed commands, no matter how desperate or heartfelt. But there are other, more sophisticated tactics to which they respond. Read on to learn how, with persistence and a bit of luck, you can successfully restore the cricket-free peace and quiet you once took for granted (and never will again).
As you’re dealing with an infestation, it’s important to take steps to prevent one from happening again. It’s worth the effort to button up your home’s exterior by means of caulks, sealants, and patching compounds. But no matter how well sealed and maintained it may be, your home can never be truly impervious to insects like crickets, despite your best efforts. So, it’s equally important to ensure that your home and its immediate surroundings hold as few enticements as possible.

Alternatively, choose a store-bought pesticidal spray. Closely follow the product instructions, of course, and bear in mind that in the home, as in the outdoors, crickets tend to linger where it’s dark and moist. Therefore, concentrate your application of pesticide in likely spots—for example, under the kitchen sink.

For some, the sound of chirping crickets summons images of sultry summer nights, while for others the incessant tweeting summons only rage. Got crickets? If so, try these strategies for getting rid of them and keeping them away.

Begin treatment with Reclaim IT. Reclaim IT is a liquid repellent insecticide concentrate that’s labeled to control over 70 different pests and offers a residual of up to 90 days. With a pump sprayer, create a barrier around the structure of your home by spraying 3 feet up the structure and 3 feet out. Next, spray areas around windows, doors, eaves, air vents, plumbing, garage doors, light fixtures, basement or crawl space openings, and any other openings you may have found.

Watch how to get rid of crickets using the Solutions four step process! This video will show exactly what to do when you have crickets overwintering in your home!
When inspecting your home exterior, look for entry points that crickets can use to get inside your home. Crickets can jump up to 3 feet high, so they can use features like vents to gain access inside. Also note any damaged or missing window screens. Indoors, you’ll be looking for crickets themselves and any eggs. Male crickets will chirp and attract nearby female crickets. If both meet indoors, the female cricket is likely to lay eggs where she thinks they’ll be safe. You can check behind and under large appliances that generate heat. Look underneath plumbing and behind electrical plates. Crickets will eat cotton, silk, and other fabrics, so check closets where fabrics may be stored, and examine furniture for chew marks. Finally, look in less frequented parts of your home, like your attic or basement for spots hidden away in tight spaces.

You can stop crickets from entering your home by keeping up with pesticide treatments and addressing the entry points you found during your inspection. Be sure to apply Reclaim IT every 90 days for guaranteed control.
Common crickets can vary in size depending on species, so they can range from .12 inches to 2 inches in length. Their bodies are typically flat and elongated, and can range in color from yellowish-brown to tan to dark brown. The hind legs are significantly larger and are used for jumping. If you’re having trouble seeing past tight spaces, try waiting until nightfall and listen for chirping sounds coming from inside.
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Once you’ve treated your perimeter, start your indoor treatment with Pyrid. Pyrid is an insecticide aerosol that delivers a quick knockdown, but offers no residual. Use this to flush out clusters of pests you may have found. To apply Pyrid in broad areas like around windows, make sure the white applicator is attached, shake the can well, and spray in swift, sweeping motions. To apply Pyrid in tight cracks and crevices, use the provided red applicator tip. Simply remove the white applicator, replace it with the red, and make sure the straw is affixed in the spout. Shake the can well, spray, and move the applicator swiftly along the length of the crevice. Keep people away from treated areas until dry and vapors have dispersed.

Round out your treatment with D-Fense Dust. D-Fense Dust is a ready-to-use insecticidal dust that’s perfect for hard to reach areas. If left undisturbed, this dust can last up to 8 months.

http://bit.ly/2t4t1D4 CLICK HERE for our cricket control guide and to get your professional-grade products! Watch how to get rid of crickets using the Soluti…