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planting tangerine seeds

Transfer the tray of pots into a location in your home that will remain right around 65 to 70 degrees F. Spread a layer of polythene film over each of the plastic pots. Check the pots daily to make sure the growing media remains moistened. Germination of tangerine seeds typically will being in 2 to 3 weeks, depending on growing conditions.

If reusing plastic pots, sterilize them before use. Place them in a 1 part bleach and 10 parts water solution for 1 to 2 minutes. Rinse them with tepid water and air dry before using.
Transplant the tangerine seedlings when they are about 2 to 3 inches tall. You can plant them into 1-gallon pots, or into larger containers until they are big enough to be planted into their permanent location.

Remove the tangerine seeds from the pulp of the tangerine and place them into a strainer, or wire basket. Fill up a sink in your kitchen with water. Then, drop in 1 teaspoon of bleach into the water. Immerse the strainer of tangerine seeds into the bleach and water solution for a quick rinse. Don’t let the tangerine seeds soak in the bleach and water solution. A quick dunking is all that is necessary
Remove the sheet of polythene film from the tray as soon as you start to seed the tangerine seedlings emerging from the soil. Then place the tray where it can receive a lot of bright light, approximately 8 to 10 hours of light daily. Keep the tangerine seedlings moist, add a little water to the tray when needed.
Place sterilized seed starting potting mix into 3- or 4-inch wide plastic pots. Or you can mix together your own by mixing together equal portions of sterilized potting mix, aged compost, fine sand, vermiculite or perlite and peat moss. Pack the soil down firmly in each of the plastic pots. Then transfer the pots into a shallow tray-like container.
By: Katelyn Lynn
Rinse the strainer containing the tangerine seeds with tepid water for about 30 seconds. Then spread the tangerine seeds onto paper towels and let them air dry.

21 September, 2017

Tangerines (Citrus reticulata) are sometimes also called satsumas and mandarins. They can grow to between 15 and 20 feet tall and are hardy in the USDA Zones 8B to 11. Tangerine trees produce 2- to 4-inch-wide, juicy, sweet fruit that are similar to oranges but thinner skinned and easier to peel. Growing a tangerine …

Planting tangerine seeds

Cover the pot with clear plastic, or slide the pot into a plastic bag. The plastic promotes germination by keeping the potting mixture warm and moist.

Fill a small pot with commercial potting mixture. Use a fresh mixture that contains materials such as compost, peat moss and perlite. Be sure the pot has drainage holes in the bottom, as poorly drained soil will rot the young seedlings.
Feed the tangerine tree monthly throughout spring and summer, using a liquid, acid-based fertilizer for rhododendrons or azaleas. Mix the fertilizer at half the strength suggested on the container.

Remove the plastic covering as soon as the seedlings emerge. Move the pot into a location with bright, indirect sunlight and room temperatures of about 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Avoid direct sunlight, which may scorch the tangerine seedlings.
With its deep green foliage, tangerine (Citrus reticulata) is an attractive tree that grows well indoors in cool climates, outdoors in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8b through 11. Growing a tangerine tree from seed is an interesting project, especially for kids as the seeds germinate easily and develop into attractive trees. However, most tangerine trees grown from seed never grow large enough to blossom and develop fruit.
Water as needed to keep the potting mixture moist, but not soggy. Never allow the mixture to become dry. Watch for seedlings to develop in about three weeks.
Purchase tangerine seeds from a garden center or nursery. Alternatively, save the seeds from a fresh tangerine. Wash fresh seeds thoroughly as the sweet juices may cause the seed to mold.
How to Start a Tangerine Tree From a Seed

Repot the seedlings into individual, 4- to 6-inch pots when the seedlings have a pair of true leaves, which are the leaves that appear after the initial seedling leaves. Continue to keep the potting soil lightly moist.

With its deep green foliage, tangerine (Citrus reticulata) is an attractive tree that grows well indoors in cool climates, outdoors in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 8b through 11. Growing a tangerine tree from seed is an interesting project, especially for kids as the seeds germinate easily and …