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passion flower adhd

Passion flower was formerly approved as an over-the-counter sedative and sleep aid in the U.S., but this approval was withdrawn in 1978 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviewed the class and manufacturers did not submit evidence of safety and effectiveness.

In foods and beverages, passion flower extract is used as a flavoring.
Some people apply passion flower directly to the skin for hemorrhoids, burns, and swelling (inflammation).

Passion flower is a climbing vine that is native to the southeastern United States, and Central and South America. The above ground parts are used to make medicine.
Passionflower might cause sleepiness and drowsiness. Medications that cause sleepiness are called sedatives. Taking passionflower along with sedative medications might cause too much sleepiness.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Passion flower is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy. There are some chemicals in the passion flower plant that might cause the uterus to contract. Don’t use passion flower if you are pregnant.
Not enough is known about the safety of taking passionflower during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and don’t use it.
The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

There isn’t enough information to rate the safety of passionflower when applied to the skin.

Learn more about Passionflower uses, effectiveness, possible side effects, interactions, dosage, user ratings and products that contain Passionflower

Passion flower adhd

Wolfman, C., Viola, H., Paladini, A., Dajas, F., and Medina, J. H. Possible anxiolytic effects of chrysin, a central benzodiazepine receptor ligand isolated from Passiflora coerulea. Pharmacol Biochem Behav 1994;47(1):1-4. View abstract.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).
Miroddi M, Calapai G, Navarra M, et al. Passiflora incarnata L: ethnopharmacology, clinical application, safety and evaluation of clinical trials. J Ethnopharmacol 2013;150:791-804. View abstract.

Farnsworth N, Bingel A, Cordell G, et al. Potential value of plants as sources of new antifertility agents I. J Pharm Sci 1975;64:535-98. View abstract.
Maroo N, Hazra A, Das T. Efficacy and safety of a polyherbal sedative-hypnotic formulation NSF-3 in primary insomnia in comparison to zolpidem: a randomized controlled trial. Indian J Pharmacol 2013;45(1):34-9. View abstract.
Capasso A., Sorrentino L. Pharmacological studies on the sedative and hypnotic effect of Kava kava and Passiflora extracts combination. Phytomedicine. 2005;12:39-45. View abstract.
Yaniv, R., Segal, E., Trau, H., Auslander, S., and Perel, A. Natural premedication for mast cell proliferative disorders. J Ethnopharmacol. 1995;46(1):71-72. View abstract.
Akhondzadeh S, Mohammadi MR, Momeni F. Passiflora incarnata in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents. Therapy 2005;2(4):609-14.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Understand more about Passion Flower uses, health benefits, side effects, interactions, safety concerns, and effectiveness.