Posted on

nitrogen nutrients for cannabis

Nitrogen nutrients for cannabis

*The full list of nutrients is available in SMART Fertilizer Management in the software. For a free product tour, click here

Cannabis originates in Southeast Asia and includes three species: C. indica, C. sativa and C. reduralis. It is a dioecious, annual plant.
In hydroponic systems, fertilizers are provided to cannabis by applying a nutrient solution, prepared according to its current nutrient requirements, growing conditions and nutrient content of the source water. We recommend to test the source water periodically, in order to obtain the exact fertilizer formula that will meet the crop demand.

*The full list of nutrients is available in SMART Fertilizer Management in the software. For a free product tour, click here
The main objective of crop nutrient management is to apply the right rates of nutrients at the right time, based on the dynamic conditions. Best results can be achieved by adjusting the applied nutrient solution, based on the variations in the growing conditions, such as temperature, humidity, source water quality, pH, salinity (EC/TDS), the composition of the nutrient solution (especially if recycled). These parameters are easy to monitor, and should be measure frequently.
GROWTH (VEGETATIVE) PHASE

The vegetative phase lasts about 45 days, during which time the plant requires a significant amount of light strength. Nutrient requirements are high, especially nitrogen, potassium and micronutrients.
The duration of the flowering stage varies among different species and can range from 50 to 140 days. This growth stage will start when the darkness photoperiod exceeds 10 hours. During the flowering stage, the nutrient requirements of cannabis change as well; the plant will require larger amounts of potassium and less nitrogen (which encourages vegetative growth).

FLOWERING PHASE

Learn about the main challenge in Cannabis nutrient management throughout the different growth cycles.

Nitrogen nutrients for cannabis

Solution: You can find many pre-mixed nutrients from the store which contain nitrogen or you could use nitrate of soda or organic fertilizer which are both good sources of nitrogen. In fact almost all plant nutrients of any kind will include nitrogen. If you haven’t been providing any nutrient to your plants, try supplementing your regular nutrients with a bit more nitrogen and see if the plant starts recovering.

You don’t want a nitrogen deficiency in the vegetative stage!
If you notice your lower cannabis leaves turning yellow in the vegetative stage or in the beginning part of the flowering stage, your plant may be experiencing a nitrogen deficiency which will need to be treated.

The first cannabis plant pictured below is showing signs of nitrogen deficiency late in flowering; nitrogen deficiency in late flowering is completely normal and even desired. The last picture is an infographic about nitrogen and your marijuana plant.
When looking at plant nutrients, you’ll almost always see 3 numbers listed, like 3-12-6 or 5-10-5. These numbers represent the percentage of Nitrogen (N), Phosphorous (P) and Potassium (K) contained in the bottle. Just about all plant life on Earth needs these 3 elements to grow.
Occassionally a nitrogen toxicity is mistake for a deficiency. Could your plant actually be nitrogen toxic? (pictured below)
Note: During the last few weeks before harvest, marijuana plants start pulling all the remaining nitrogen from her leaves as part of the bud-making process. This causes yellowing leaves starting towards the bottom of the plant. This is part of the natural flowering process and you don’t need to fight it. You may notice that marijuana leaves are yellowing in almost all pictures of marijuana plants with big buds that are close to harvest. You tend to get smaller yields from nitrogen-toxic plants with dark green leaves at harvest.
Nitrogen-deficient plants often appear pale or lime-colored. The leaves on this marijuana plant don’t have obvious leaf symptoms like spots or markings, but they are pale all over the whole plant. Almost lime green. The light-colored leaves are a sign the plant needs more Nitrogen (and nutrients in general). On the flip side, plants that are receiving too much Nitrogen turn dark.

Example of cannabis Nitrogen deficiency – yellow bottom leaves. Almost all plant nutrients contain Nitrogen

A nitrogen deficiency causes the lower/older leaves of a cannabis plant to start yellowing, wilting, and dropping off on their own. Learn how to fix it.