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mother’s finest

Mother’s finest

After dabbling in dance music with several different lineups in the 1980s, the trio formed an all-African-American band in the early ’90s by recruiting guitarist John Hayes and drummer Dion Derek. The angry, rocking result was the 1992 CD Black Radio Won’t Play This Record, which proved prophetic despite being the band’s best since its 1979 live album (yet white radio wouldn’t play it either).

It is difficult and often highly dangerous to hang a label on music. Labels can close doors to some of the most exciting talents, and close ears to artist whose fresh vitality demands to be heard. Mother’s Finest is a powerful band, but they are not typical.
Known internationally, they are incomparable and unique in their ability to bring it to you in concert. And now after several year’s quiet, they’re still one of the best LIVE bands on the planet.

The group has created a sound they describe as a fusion of Funk, Rock, Gospel, R&B Metal and Jazz, taken directly from the street to the stage to the studio, that is Afro-Euro Mosaic Soulful and Electric, transcending musical division, and negative stereotyping.
Alex Cooley’s Electric Ballroom was where Tom Werman of Epic records saw Mother’s Finest for the first time in Atlanta Georgia. They went on to record their first of three gold albums ” Another Mother Further, Mother Factor, and Mother’s Finest Live “.
MOTHERS FINEST is Joyce Kennedy, Glenn Murdock, lead vocals, Jerry “Wyzard” Seay, Bass, Gary “Mo” Moore, lead guitar, John Hayes, lead guitar, Dion Murdock, drummer.
For the remainder of the 1970s, Mother’s Finest became the most dangerous opening act in rock, blowing away headliners like Aerosmith, Frank Marino & Mahogany Rush, and Ted Nugent. A subpar third album, 1978’s Mother Factor, took nothing away from the band’s live performances, as vocalists Murdock — and particularly the powerful Kennedy — enthralled audiences over the funk rock backline of Mo, Wizzard, Borden, and Mike. The 1979 album Mother’s Finest Live featured not only original staples like “Watch My Stylin’” and “Give You All the Love,” but also Kennedy singing a stunning cover of Jefferson Airplane’s “Somebody to Love” and the musicians shining on a rearranged version of Steppenwolf’s “Magic Carpet Ride.”
Georgia funk rock band Mother’s Finest might appear to be only a blip on the radar screen of rock history, but not to any of the headlining bands they’ve stolen shows from — or any of the audiences who saw it happen. Following in the footsteps of the racially-mixed Sly & the Family Stone, Mother’s Finest blended white guitarist Moses Mo and drummer B.B. “Queen” Borden with black vocalists Joyce Kennedy and Glenn Murdock, bassist Wyzard, and keyboardist Mike, for its 1976 self-titled debut album. Tracks like “Rain” and the slightly controversial “Niggazz Can’t Sing Rock & Roll” made enough of a ripple to get the band out of Georgia clubs and into regional touring. The follow-up album Another Mother Further lived up to its title.

Mother’s Finest is a funk rock band founded in Atlanta, Georgia by Joyce Kennedy and Glenn Murdock in the early 1970s. The group charted with the singles “Fire” (#93 Pop Singles), “Baby Love” (#79 Black Singles, #58 Pop Singles), “Don’t Wanna Come Back” (#54 Black Singles), “Love Changes” (#26 Black Singles), and “Piece Of The Rock” in the mid to late 1970s.

Mother’s Finest Bio Mother’s Finest is a funk rock band founded in Atlanta, Georgia by Joyce Kennedy and Glenn Murdock in the early 1970s. The group charted with the singles “Fire” (#93

But first, Kennedy has a speech to refine.

As the wildly stylish frontwoman for Mother’s Finest, the Atlanta-based, multiracial funk band that soared in the 1970s on a combination of sinewy rock and fiery live performances, Kennedy is, actually, tickled to the point of near-speechlessness about the honor.
Pioneer: Paul Cochran, longtime concert promoter responsible for staging multi-act shows in the 1960s featuring artists such as Roy Orbison, Johnny Burnette and Dick & Dee Dee sharing a bill. Originator of Old Man Productions.

While Mother’s Finest is often touring — check out a YouTube clip of the group performing in Switzerland in May if you need proof of its continued live prowess— it is already lining up U.S. dates for January and Europe next spring.
Group: Mother’s Finest, a multiracial funk-rock band credited for its incendiary live performances as well as breaking down racial barriers for other artists. Songs include “Fire,” “Baby Love” and “Love Changes.”
But despite their reputation and a level of success that still keeps them touring, the band never exploded on radio.
When Joyce “Baby Jean” Kennedy found out last month that her band would be inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame, her reaction was incredulity tempered by a hint of cynicism.
“It’s just downright awesome,” she said. “It’s been seeping in over the last few weeks and I’m going, ‘Oh, [expletive], I didn’t see this coming!”

“What held us back more than anything was making the record, taking what we did onstage and getting people to embrace it on record,” Kennedy said. “The bureaucracy was harder on us than on the people who wanted to invest in the band. We had some good managers, but I don’t think they could see past the interracial element.”

When Joyce “Baby Jean” Kennedy found out last month that her band would be inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame, her reaction was incredulity tempered by a hint of cynicism.