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medicinal seeds and their uses

Medicinal seeds and their uses

Evidence: 3.5/5

In fact, at the beginning of the 21st century, 11 percent of the 252 drugs considered “basic and essential” by the World Health Organization were “exclusively of flowering plant origin.” Drugs like codeine, quinine, and morphine all contain plant-derived ingredients.
Safety: 3/5

However, many herbs and teas offer harmless subtle ways to improve your health. Pay attention to what the evidence says about each herb’s effectiveness as well as potential interactions or safety issues. Avoid using herbs for infants and children and for those who are pregnant and breastfeeding. Most herbs haven’t been tested for safety for those who are vulnerable, and trying herbs isn’t worth the risk.
While these manufactured drugs have certainly become paramount in our lives, it can be comforting to know that the power of nature is on our side, and these herbal choices are available to complement our health practices.
If you’d like to add some medicinal plants to your wellness regimen, Wilson sifted through the latest studies and provides her own ratings system for our list.
However, both plants and supplements, which aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration for safety or quality, can have questionable dosage and might have a risk of contamination. Keep this in mind before choosing supplements from the shelf.
Today, we live in a time when manufactured medicines and prescriptions prevail, but do they have to be the only approach to healing?

Recent research is looking into a component that can help diabetes, and there continue to be more studies, including an animal study that says it might influence bone healing.

Meet gingko, grapeseed extract, echinacea, and six more powerful plants with science-backed health benefits. Natural remedies abound, but these are the heavy hitters when it comes to relieving pain, inflammation, stress, dry skin, and much more.

Infusion: A tea made by pouring boiling water over the plant or parts of the plant. The most common method of preparing an infusion is to place herbs in a heat tolerant container that has a lid, and pour boiling water over the herbs ( a normal rule of thumb is to use a cup of green herbs per cup of boiling water applied, or a handful of dry herbs per cup of boiling water applied ). Cover the container and allow the herbs to steep in covered container for about 15 minutes. Your infusion is now ready to enjoy!

Compresses and Poultices: A compress is basically a cloth soaked in herbal decoction or infusion that is applied to painful areas. Use Comfrey for sports type injuries, Plantain for insect bits and bee stings, St. John’s Wort and Rosemary for pain relief and Chamomile for cramp relief. A poultice is made by placing a cup of the chosen herb in a heat tolerant bowl, pouring boiling water over the herbs and allowing to steep until the herbs have cooled enough to be tolerated by the skin.
Place a clean cotton cloth over the infected area, then place the warm/semi hot herbs on top of the cloth and cover with another piece of cotton cloth. Keep the poultice in place until the herbs have cooled down completely. Discard the herbs and wash the poultice cloths before reusing. Best results are obtained when poultices are applied 3 times a day.
Demulcent: An herb that possesses soothing, mucilaginous qualities which help to relieve any internal irritation such as arrowroot, coltsfoot, comfrey, sassafras pith, and slippery elm.

Herb: Any plant used for making medicine, seasoning or scents.
Decoction: A drink made by boiling the plant or parts of the plant in water and then straining. As a rule of thumb, place the herbs in water that has been brought to a boil, then reduce heat until the water is gently simmering. Simmer for about 15 minutes, then strain. The liquid is the decoction. Honey or an aromatic herb is usually added to improve the taste.
Liniment: A liniment is a topical solution applied to the skin. How to make a liniment: You will need a clean glass jar with lid, a pint size canning jar works fine, a cup of chopped fresh herbs from your garden or ¼ cup of dried herbs ( we recommend our tincture packs ) 1/2 pint of grain alcohol ( such as Everclear ) and 1/2 pint of distilled water.
Place the herb material into the jar and fill jar with equal parts grain alcohol and distilled water. Close lid tightly and label the jar with the ingredients and the date.
Store the jar in a dark, dry and cool place. Every 2 days, shake the jar vigorously.
After four to six weeks, strain the mixture through a screen or colander, catching the liquid in bowl, then take the herbs and wrap in a towel or pillowcase and squeeze as much liquid as possible from herbs, catching this liquid in the bowl as well.
The Strained liquid is your finished liniment. We recommend storing liniments in four ounce amber glass bottles. Be sure to label bottles correctly!
Aromatic. This refers to herbs that have a pleasant smell or taste. They are often used for potpourri or for adding to other herbs to improve the taste of a decoction. One part aromatic to three parts medicinal herb is usually sufficient.
Herbal Lozenges: Herbal lozenges are a wonderful way to soothe a sore throat or relieve cold and flu conditions.
How to make Herbal Lozenges: You will need about 4 ounces of your favorite herbal decoction, we recommend Blue Vervain, Echinacea or Sage.
Pour decoction into a bowl and add powdered Marsh Mallow root until you have a thick, paste like solution. Add 3-4 drops of peppermint essential oil to mix.
Make small lozenges by pinching small amounts of the mix between your fingers and shaping to size. Place lozenges on wax paper and allow to dry for a few hours, then store in covered container in refrigerator.
Lozenges should keep in the fridge for several weeks.
Suck on a lozenge whenever you have a sore throat.

Tincture: A preparation made by soaking an herb in alcohol until the alcohol absorbs the beneficial ingredients of the plant. This process is known as maceration.
How to make a tincture: You will need a clean glass jar with lid, a pint size canning jar works fine, a cup of chopped fresh herbs from your garden or ¼ cup of dried herbs ( we recommend our tincture packs ) and 1 pint of vodka. The vodka is usually about 80-85 proof, do not use 100 proof vodka.
Place the herb material into the jar and fill jar with vodka. Close lid tightly and label the jar with the ingredients and the date.
Store the jar in a dark, dry and cool place. Every 2 days, shake the jar vigorously.
After four to six weeks, strain the mixture through a screen or colander, catching the liquid in bowl, then take the herbs and wrap in a towel or pillowcase and squeeze as much liquid as possible from herbs, catching this liquid in the bowl as well.
The Strained liquid is your finished tincture. We recommend storing tinctures in four ounce amber glass bottles, and keeping smaller one ounce amber glass bottles with droppers in your medicine cabinet, re-filling the smaller bottles as needed. Be sure to label bottles correctly!

Unusual Medicinal Plant Seeds