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master dream strain

Master dream strain

Dispensary lady: My guy, today we’ve got some Jack Herer, which is sativa-dominant and has a cerebral and talkative high, or Banana Clip, which is close to a 50/50 hybrid and will give you the body buzz of an indica with some of the effects of a sativa. We’ve also got God’s Green Crack and Mango Dream.

According to Myles, it’s better to think of weed as existing on a spectrum of sativa-ness and indica-ness, and the most accurate way to describe weed is its THC and CBD content rather than its genetic heritage. This is how government-approved medicinal grow-ops do business. Bedrocan, for example, doesn’t name its pot after marijuana strains you find on the street, and indicates THC and CBD content.
So, “pure” sativa or indica strains are also probably fictions. Still, the scientific literature suggests that plants with more sativa ancestry have higher levels of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, than indica-dominant plants, which have higher levels of cannabidiol, or CBD. As for what these compounds do, many studies have shown basically the same thing: THC gets you high, and CBD does not. It’s not totally clear what CBD does to the brain, but a 2008 study showed that, in high doses, CBD and THC can work together, with CBD alleviating some of the anxiety reported after THC ingestion.

“They call things Purple Kush, but Purple Kush does not mean anything,” said Sean Myles, a professor of agricultural genetic diversity at Dalhousie University and co-author of the 2015 study, over the phone. “There are so many exceptions, and the correlation is so weak, that putting a number on a bag and saying, ‘This is a 50/50 hybrid of indica and sativa,’ is highly, highly dubious.”
This might be because, when it comes to the genetic differences between a strain of weed that’s supposedly 30 percent indica and 70 percent sativa, or vice-versa, science has already strongly suggested that it’s a big lie. A 2015 study by Canadian scientists looked at 81 marijuana strains and found that the reported sativa-indica split rarely matched their actual genetic makeup.
For example, instead of telling someone they’re about to smoke Purple Kush, it’s better to say they’re about to smoke “Bedrobinol,” one of Bedrocan’s trademarked products, which has a standardized THC content of 13.5 percent and less than 1 percent CBD. It’s less fun, but at least you know what you’re getting.
Strain names at a cannabis grow outside Denver. Photo: Motherboard
I informally polled a handful of coworkers and their friends, and most believed that the general differences between sativa and indica-dominant strains are real. Some said they keep coming back to a particular cannabis strain, like Jack Herer. One person who asked to go by “Doug” said they prefer “pure” sativa strains.

We may loosely call things “indica” or “sativa,” Myles continued, and that’s a fair rule of thumb for describing their physical traits and psychoactive effects. But since nobody was keeping track of marijuana with the methods of a modern agriculturist some 5,000 years ago, we don’t know what a “pure” sativa or indica really is, DNA-wise, he said. Who’s to say what the defining characteristics of a pure sativa or indica really are?

Cannabis strains labelled "sativa" and "indica" promise different physical effects but scientifically speaking, even the “best” weed strains are probably bullshit—names like "Purple Kush" don't mean anything.