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how to take a tolerance break

Some point towards science in the plant and our bodies. They point out that CBD lacks the psychoactive effects of THC, noting that CBD does not bind to the same receptors as THC. Not only does that mean CBD won’t get you high, consuming it shouldn’t disrupt the re-sensitizing process undertaken by a tolerance break.

Others offered similar sentiments in regards to the non-psychoactive benefits of the cannabinoid. In several cases, consumers self-reported feeling calmer, while others say CBD helped when desires to consume THC came on.
Some have found success doing partial breaks, where they scale back their use instead of an outright stoppage. This may work but is not as reliable as a full-fledged break. In other cases, the T-break is thrust upon us. This can be in the case with job applications, parental rights cases, probation terms and several different instances. In these cases, breaks can last for months, even years.

The rise of CBD is the cannabis community inevitably found its ways into the tolerance break discussion as well. While not a hot topic of discussion in comparison to other subjects with the cannabis community online, some have weighed in on the matter. In most cases, they suggest that CBD is adequate, if not recommended, during a break.
There are numerous tips and tricks to succeeding with a tolerance break. Depending on who you ask, you may find yourself taking up new activities. Often, you are recommended to toss your stash. Some might suggest discussing your break with your cannabis community so no one will tempt you.
Monday March 16, 2020
How long do you take tolerance breaks for? Do you have any tips or tricks for maximizing results? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below.
Acknowledging that a break is trying on the individual, the guide aims to help people push through the adversity of a cannabis pause so they can re-evaluate themselves. Each week focuses on a theme with daily practices. The first week centers on the physical, ranging from preparation to our routines. The second week delves into the emotional, ranging from withdrawal to a person’s creativity. Lastly, the final week explores spiritual and existential themes, from crediting yourself, not the substance, to what comes after the break is completed.

Tolerance breaks serve a purpose in two scenarios. In one case, they can be self-imposed. The other may be out of one’s control and instead be a necessity for the moment – such as a Coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

Considering taking a tolerance break from cannabis? Learn more about how long a proper marijuana tolerance break should be, as well as helpful tips to guide you through the process.

How to take a tolerance break

Remember that time your parents got you into piano lessons for 6 straight years, but now you can barely remember the do-re-mi’s? This is exactly the same!

All this tolerance talk about THC, but what about CBD? For those of you who don’t know, CBD is a cannabinoid, just like THC. The difference between these is that while THC causes a “high”, CBD does not. Cannabidiol has numerous applications in the medical field for this same reason. It gives users a relaxed feeling with its anti-anxiety benefits, while still keeping the mind functional. Even better, a study [2] suggests that CBD can help limit the rate at which THC binds to CB1 receptors. As a result, CBD can potentially reduce the high and support a quicker recovery.
If deep down you’re doing this because of your girlfriend or because a couple of your friends are also doing it – it won’t work. You need to truly set your intention before you even decide on a time frame.

It might sound simple, but if you usually have a joint when you wake up in the morning, and another before bed at night, try cutting one of them out of your routine. Reducing your intake by just one joint a day can have a dramatic effect on your tolerance to THC. Another handy tip is to change the size of the rolling papers you use. Smaller papers mean less weed can be packed into your joint. When it comes to actually lighting up, you’ll barely notice the difference, at least on the outside—on the inside, however, your CB1 receptors will be thanking you.
Secondly, researchers have suggested [3] that exercise might help your body shift the THC it stores in fat cells. Less build-up means a better high when you do decide to pick up where you left off. If you really don’t want to give up cannabis entirely, try doing exercise after you smoke to help shift the THC that little bit quicker. Regular exercise can go some of the way in keeping your tolerance down.
It might be because of a new job or because the court told you to. You might be going to a not-so-cannabis-friendly holiday spot, or you’re travelling with family members who don’t partake on bong rips. Or maybe you’re just looking to enhance your cannabis experience. You miss those original highs. Maybe you’ve been feeling too cloudy for the past few months or even years. Whatever your reason is, we’ll be covering what to do and how to go about this “tolerance break” in the best way possible.
If you miss the taste and smell of weed, as well as the physical rituals of your regular smoke sessions, why give up a good thing? With Solomatic, you can light-up or vape to your heart’s content, and still take a tolerance break. This groundbreaking strain contains practically no THC, so it’s a good ally during your pause on more potent cannabis.
Choose a date. It’s super important to have a deadline. Don’t set out to take a break from anywhere in-between a few days to a couple of weeks. This will motivate the thought of “yeah, it’s been long enough” to shine through. Without a clear date, there will be nothing in your brain telling you that you haven’t already gone long enough.

Most consumers do this because cannabinoid receptors (especially CB1 receptors) start to downregulate the reception of THC upon frequent and heavy use. It’s not just you getting used to the “high” feeling, it’s actually your physiology trying to adapt to your THC consumption and turning it into “normal.” It’s your body’s natural way of saying “well, if this is how it’s going to be, might as well be functional like this.” In a survival sense, your body tries to keep you aware and safe even after consuming THC because it knows this is how you are everyday.

Have you ever felt that weed is not getting you as high as it did before? Missing those giggly highs? Maybe you need a tolerance break.