Grass Seed Without Weeds

Pearls Premium drought tolerant grass seed conserves water lawn care yard sod organic fertilizer eco global friendly winterize sprinkler hybrid sustainable America's favorite seed company has grown to become one of the leading suppliers of agricultural, reclamation, grass seed, & lawn seed in North America. In addition to our own production fields, we use an extensive network of trusted wildland seed collectors and growers. Learn More! The best lawns start with the best grass seed. We reveal our favourite seed mixes for growing your own lush green carpet

Imagine Mowing Only 5 Times Per Year!

If you’ve always dreamed of having a great looking lawn, but weren’t wild about all the maintenance, money and time that goes into keeping it up, then we’ve got the solution you’ve been looking for! Pearl’s Premium Grass Seed is your ticket to a beautiful, vibrant lawn, without all of that fuss, and it’s taking the home and garden world by storm! With a Pearl’s Premium lawn, you not only get to enjoy that lush, emerald green lawn we all covet, but you get to save dramatic amounts of time, water AND money.

Why? Because our grass seed mixture is designed specifically to grow beautifully without the need for excess water or expensive, harsh chemical treatments. In fact, a Pearl’s Premium lawn is so low maintenance, you’ll only need to mow it once a month – if at all! Pearl’s Premium Grass Seed is the only grass seed where 6 years of research was done to design a sustainable (needs little to no water) and eco-friendly (no chemical fertilizer needed) lawn, allowing you to save time, money, and the environment all in one go!

Pearl’s Premium Grass Seed was created for homeowners just like you, to reduce your carbon footprint in 4 ways, as Pearl’s Premium is also an oxygen producing carbon sink, without having to sacrifice a great-looking lawn in the process – no wasted water from constant watering, no more toxic chemical treatments and fertilizers that harm the environment, and no more wasted fuel from constant mowing! A Pearl’s Premium lawn is always low maintenance and always beautiful!

Pearl’s Premium In The News: A Look at the End Results

We have received 34 rave reviews by lawn, agricultural, and environmental experts in the media:

“Jackson Madnick may have designed the perfect lawn grass. It’s not just about looks, but also about low maintenance, conserving energy, protecting the environment, and even knocking a couple hundred dollars off your water bill.” – Robert Knox, Boston Globe

“The Holy Grail for many home owners. grows so slowly that it only needs mowing once a month.” – Charlie Nardozzi, National Gardening Association

“Come September I’ll be making changes to my lawn.” – Kerry Healy – Former Mass. Lt. Govn, NPR commentator – WGBH 89.7

“Mow just once a month. ” – Meghan Dockendorf, Assistant Editor This Old House Magazine

This Sounds Too Good to Be True! Can You Tell Me More?

How was Pearl’s Premium created? Did you genetically modify the seeds?

So I don’t need chemical fertilizer with Pearl’s Premium Grass Seed?

Can I use organic fertilizer if I want to? Would there be a benefit to doing so?

There are literally hundreds of different varieties of grass out there, but only a handful of them are used for the average lawn, and they just aren’t the most efficient choices for the job! We set out to change that, and after 8 years of dedicated research and development, we created Pearl’s Premium Grass Seed – a special, patent-pending, all natural, native mixture of slow-growing grass varieties that need little to no water without sacrificing great looks in the bargain – no genetic modification required!

No! A Pearl’s Premium lawn never needs a chemical fertilizer to stay healthy and beautiful. Our grass seed mixture is comprised mainly of Fescue grass, which is slow-growing and has long, deep roots designed to find water naturally. The average lawn is made from Blue grass or Rye grass, varieties that require more nutrients because they grow so quickly and have shallow roots that go through water and fertilizer much faster, and need constant replenishing.

Yes, absolutely! Pearl’s Premium Grass Seed is crafted to produce a beautiful lawn, and with an application or two of organic, eco-friendly fertilizer, you’ll find your lawn is even more vibrant and healthy. Of course, you can also use organic fertilizers on any lawn – but the average lawn needs a whole lot more of it, sometimes more than 8 applications a year! With a Pearl’s Premium lawn, however, you’ll only need to use your organic fertilizer once or twice a year, saving you time and money.

The Truth About Chemical Fertilizers and Pesticides:

Is your lawn safe for your kids and pets?

Health Magazine featured a story about the 12 most toxic things in your home environment, noting that a chemically-maintained lawn is the single most toxic thing inside or outside your home!

What ends up in our homes affects children, animals and others. Lawn care chemicals and pesticides get carried into homes on shoes, paws and air currents. Once inside, pesticides linger in carpets, on toys and in the air we breathe. The Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection claims that pesticide and chemical exposure is responsible for an alarming increase in several health problems in children, the elderly, and our furry friends.

Pearl’s Premium needs NO chemical fertilizers and pesticides to stay healthy. Protect your loved ones today by investing in a safer lawn!

How Much Can Pearl’s Premium Save Me?

Let’s take a look at how much money Pearl’s Premium will actually SAVE you.

Why are the costs for Pearl’s Premium so much lower?

A lawn seeded with Pearl’s Premium needs far less seeding, mowing, watering, and fertilizing than a lawn seeded with common grass seed. For a small lawn of 3,000 sq. ft., Pearl’s Premium can save you up to $1,248.56 or more! For larger lawns, the savings only gets better!

For comparison, let’s say you have a 3,000 square foot lawn.

Pearl’s Premium Ultra Low Maintenance Grass Seed vs. Current Grass

*(3) 5lb. bags of Pearl’s Premium vs. (15) 10lb bags of Scott’s covering 3000 sq. ft. & these assumptions

This one is easy – it’s all about the roots! A Pearl’s Premium lawn costs less to maintain because of the way the grass grows. Pearl’s Premium Grass Seed produces a lawn full of slow-growing grass that rarely, if ever, needs mowed. Its roots are much longer than the average lawn’s, allowing the grass to quest deeper into the soil for its own water, which eliminates that high water bill in the summer from running the sprinklers. And a Pearl’s Premium lawn does not need constant chemical fertilizer applications to stay looking great – just an application or two of natural, organic fertilizer a year.

What Our Customers Have to Say About Pearls’ Premium

“We seeded our front lawn last spring with Pearl’s Premium and were fortunate to have a very wet spring/early summer. By fall, we could see the difference one seeding had made: a denser lawn and already fewer weeds. We decided to seed the back lawn this spring and to overseed the front. We are very pleased with the results so far and hope for an even lower-maintenance lawn after this season. We recommend Pearl’s Premium to anyone who wants to put away the lawnmower and turn off the sprinklers.” -Gwenn, Wakefield, MA

“We cannot begin to say enough good things about this (Pearl’s Premium Lawn Seed) product. I originally learned about Pearl’s through a donation to the North South River Watershed Association (nsrwa.org). We have struggled with the “traditional” big-box store multi-stage solutions, spent tons of money on fertilizer and lots of hard work that still left me wondering what I was still doing wrong . If you are still hoping to have a pretty green lawn this summer and are thinking you must be doing something wrong, spend a few extra bucks once, give this stuff a try and just relax. “ – Steve, Norwell, MA

“We are coming up on one year since planting. We thoroughly enjoyed all the compliments last summer after the great crop of grass came up!

We love your product and are sharing the word with others on our lake. We look forward to improving the density every year, and enjoying the overall quality. Thanks!” – Rita, Lakeside in Minnesota

Say “Goodbye” to Expensive, Time Consuming Lawncare and “Hello” to Pearl’s Premium!

We know that you are going to love your new Pearl’s Premium lawn! With Pearl’s Premium, you can have a sustainable, eco-friendly yard that doesn’t eat up a ton of your time or your monthly budget. Easy to install and so easy to care for, your Pearl’s Premium lawn will be the talk (and the envy!) of the neighborhood.

It’s time you had the lawn you’ve always dreamed of having. With Pearl’s Premium Grass Seed, there’s no more wasted water, no more wasted time and fuel from mowing all the time, no more harmful, harsh, and toxic chemical fertilizers to keep it looking good – just a gorgeous green lawn that practically takes care of itself!

For lawns with 50% or more sunshine. One 5lb. bag per 1,000 sq. ft. lawn.

Not Sure Whether to Buy the Sunny or Shady Mixture?

For lawns that sit in direct sunlight for more than half of the day, we would recommend our Pearl’s Premium sunny mixture.

If you’re lawn is shaded for at least half of the day, our Pearl’s Premium shady mixture would be better suited.

We recommend a 5lb. bag for every 1,000 sq. ft. of lawn – or seed extra heavy at 7-8 lbs per 1,000 sq ft to crowd out weeds in a sunny lawn. Have a large lawn? We also offer a 25lb. bulk package in both sunny and shady mixtures!

For lawns with 50% or more shade. One 5lb. bag per 1,000 sq. ft. lawn.

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Lawn Grass Seed

Seed is by far the smartest way to establish a lawn, but not all seed is created equal.

Anybody can purchase lawn seed at their local big-box store, but do you think that’s where golf course superintendents or high-end property managers go for their projects? Not a chance. A careful look at the seed tags of these products will reveal their true nature – high levels of inert matter, filler species, and mediocre varieties.

But Nature’s Seed is different, and you’ll notice the difference in your lawn when you order one of our bags. Read below to learn more about our grass seed, how to seed your lawn, and which options are right for you!

Lawn Seed

Categories

Ornamental Grasses

Clover Seeds (Lawn Additive)

Kentucky Bluegrass Seed

Perennial Ryegrass Seed

Fescue Grass Seed

Bahia Grass

Bermudagrass Seed

Buffalograss Seed

Zoysia Grass Seed

America’s love for lawns is apparent — but not everybody has such good luck when it comes to a green lawn. These days there are so many options and styles that it’s essential to know what the best grass seed for your lawn is.

Nature’s Seed believes that a great lawn starts at the seed. That’s why we provide high-quality bags of seed with no added filler. Read below to learn the in’s and out’s of the lawn seeds we offer, where you can grow them, and other considerations when buying grass seed for your lawn.

Best Grass Seed

Things to Consider When Buying Grass Seed

If you’re looking to buy grass seed, there are a few things you’ll want to address first.
You’ll have to think about whether your lawn is dying or damaged, whether it’s for pasture or forage use, and what kind of sun, shade, and rain it gets.

  • Step #1: Choose Grass For Your Region
  • Step #2: The Purpose of the Grass
  • Step #3: Buy Quality Grass Seed

You’ll want to narrow down your list of choices to start, and for that we recommend our calculator that tells you the best seeds by region. Knowing what kinds of grasses do well in your area is the right way to start because many cool-season types of grass will go dormant and dry up in the southern summer months.

After you’ve narrowed down types of grass ideal for your climate, it’s time to think about how you’re using the grass:

  • Is it for your front lawn?
  • Will there be a lot of damage or traffic, like grazing and playing?
  • What type of soil do you have?
  • How much sun and shade does your lawn get?
  • How much rainfall do you get each week?

Answering these questions will help point you to the right grass seed. For example, in hot climates, lawns with sandy soils, lots of sun, and dry skies might be a perfect place to plant Bahia seed (since Bahia is known to be hardy with soil types and drought-tolerant). Explore your options by region and find the best one for you.

Buying quality lawn seed might sound obvious, but it’s sometimes hard to tell the difference between top grain and mediocre seed just by looking at the bag.

See also  Weed And Seed Directions

The good news is that there are general rules of thumb that you want to abide by:

  • No more than 0.5% weed seed
  • 0% noxious weeds
  • The inert matter should not exceed 2%
  • Germination should be 85% or more

At Nature’s Seed, we ensure that every bag meets or exceeds these guidelines — and big-box stores can’t make that promise.

Get To Know Your Grass Types

FUN FACT: In early America, grass seed was primarily used to feed livestock.

There are hundreds of species of grass, but there are only two grass types: warm-season grasses and cool-season grasses. Appropriately choosing species for your climate from these two overarching types will ensure a healthy and thriving lawn.

Some warm-season and cool-season grasses do well in what’s called the “transitional zone,” which is a belt that runs horizontally through the middle of the United States. These grasses are a mix of warm- and cold-tolerant to certain extents. But there are important differences between the two types:

Warm-season grass originates in the south and does best in hot weather. It goes dormant and turns brown with a cold temperature. It does better planted in the spring so it can grow throughout the warm summer months.

Cool-season grass originates from the north and grows rapidly in the spring and fall, turns brown in the high summer heat, best to plant in late summer or early fall.

There’s a simple way to depict which kinds of grasses do well in your region. First, you can refer to the USDA’s Plant Hardiness Zone Map.

Plant Hardiness Zones

The planting zones are determined by:

  • Length of the growing season
  • Timing and amount of rainfall
  • Winter lows
  • Summer highs
  • Wind
  • Humidity

Throughout the map, you’ll notice varying colors and ranges. This color-coded map is used to identify your zone, which can help you choose the best grasses for your area. For example, Texas has a wide range of zones, varying from 6 to 9, which means you could find a variety of transitional and warm-season grasses there.

Warm-Season Grasses

Warm-season grasses excel in warm climates. They also do well in poor soils with low moisture-holding capacity. When warm-season grasses dry out, it can be harvested and stored to dry out as hay.

Although generally hardy grasses, its primary growth is mid-summer and requires water and sometimes fertilization during the first few weeks. It’s also crucial that you choose a grass ideal for your soil type and climate so you can keep a green-looking lawn year-round.

Here, you can learn about the best warm-season grasses. First, sure to do a soil test and check your area’s best grass seed by region.

#1: Bermuda

Like most grasses present in the United States, Bermuda grass isn’t native to the U.S. And despite what its name implies, it’s not native to Bermuda! It originates from East Africa, arriving in the states during the 1750s as a forage grass for cattle.

Because of its hardiness, bermudagrass is a favorite in the southwestern U.S. It is a dense and adaptable turf grass that is used for lawns, pastures, athletic fields, golf courses, and parks, making it perfect for high-traffic areas. It does best in warm weather, but is also cool-tolerant to a certain extent, although it will go dormant below 60°F.

It grows as far as Virginia, excelling in tropical climates where it will stay bright green year-round. Its planting zones are 7, 8, 9, and 10, which covers the southern U.S. with a distinct line from Virginia to some parts of New Mexico, Arizona, and California.

#2: Buffalograss

Buffalograss is a low-maintenance, tough turf grass that is native to the Great Plains from Montana to New Mexico. It was first used as turf in the 1930s and impressed many homeowners with its cold-resistance and drought-tolerance.

If you look closely, you’ll notice its dark bluish-green color with slightly curled blades at the ends. Water needs are minimal so that you can expect a bright green lawn throughout the hottest temperatures of the summer. However, because it’s not a thick grass, buffalograss is susceptible to weeds.

Buffalograss has a wide planting zone, ranging between 5, 6, 7, and 8, taking up the majority of the transitional zones and all of the southern U.S. This grass is ideal for those who want a vibrant lawn throughout the hottest of summers.

#3: Zoysia

Zoysia grass is a dark green grass that is relatively new to the United States, and was introduced from the coast of the Philippines in Manila in 1911. Ideal for lawns with high-traffic and full to partial sun, it has a slow establishment rate. But the good news is that once it forms, zoysia most often resists any weeds.

Zoysia is drought-tolerant, so water needs are minimal — however, if not watered just right, it will go dormant. It will turn brown after the first frost but resumes growth at 70°F. Although its hardiness allows it to grow in a variety of soils, it doesn’t do well in overly-wet soils.

Its planting zones are 7, 8, 9, and 10, covering the majority of the southern U.S., with a few exceptions in the northern parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas.

#4: Bahiagrass

Bahiagrass is native to South America and is primarily used in the southeastern U.S. It is an excellent lawn seed for lawns that need a pick-me-up due to poor soils and areas without plenty of rainfall. It is also low-maintenance without requiring too much water or fertilizing.

However, it will die out in the shade, in acidic soils, near saltwater, or if there’s too much foot traffic. It is light green with coarse, short leaves that are susceptible to diseases.

Its planting zones are parts of 1, 2, 5, 8, 9, and 11. This makes it unique, covering the majority of the southeastern U.S. from Virginia to Florida to Texas. However, it doesn’t do well in extremely arid areas like New Mexico or Arizona but excels just fine in all of California.

Cool-Season Grasses

Cool-season grasses are types of grass that have adapted to do well in climates with fluctuating temperatures. They don’t typically die out in the harsh winter months and might be able to resist extreme weather better than the warm-season counterpart. These grasses do their best growing between 60 to 75°F, which is why it’s best to plant in the spring and fall.

Although cool-season grasses take up the majority of the U.S., it’s essential to know which species will do best in your area. Check out our list below and be sure to refer to a planting zone map.

#1: Kentucky Bluegrass

Kentucky bluegrass is a meadow-grass that is native to Europe, North Asia, and the mountains of Algeria and Morocco. Sometime between the 15th and 19th century, the Spanish Empire brought these lawn seeds in mixtures with other grasses. Today, Kentucky bluegrass is used all over humid, cold parts of the U.S.

Kentucky bluegrass is often used as a pasture plant, athletic fields, and lawns and gardens. The blades are thin with rounded tips like the bow of a boat, but it grows densely which makes it traffic-tolerant. However, it does have a shallow root system which means it requires frequent watering — but it spreads quickly, maintains density, and heals quickly after damage.

Because of its hardiness, Kentucky bluegrass thrives in planting zones 1 through 7, which is all across the northern belt of the U.S., from Maine to parts of Oregon, including transitional zones. In these climates, it remains green and lush with the right watering. What more could a homeowner want?

#2: Perennial Ryegrass

Perennial ryegrass is perhaps the most versatile grass seed in the U.S. It is ideal as pasture seed and for home lawns and gardens, where it establishes quickly, has a long growing season, tolerates traffic, and recovers quickly from damage.

Perennial ryegrass is an excellent targeting grass seed. It does best in cold-weather regions for pastures and turf, serving a year-round presence as opposed to annual ryegrass, which goes dormant during the hot midsummer.

You can find perennial ryegrass all across the U.S., serving as a cool-season lawn in the northern half and used to overseed warm-season grasses in the southern parts. It does best between planting zones 3 through 7.

#3: Fine Fescue

Ideal for the northeast, northwest, and the transitional zones, fine fescue is a disease-resistant, bunch-forming grass that originates from Europe. It was introduced to the U.S. in the early 1800s when lawns became fashionable to Americans, especially for those who craved a year-round lawn that grows quickly.

When planting fine fescue, it’s crucial to spread across the lawn carefully. Since it grows in bunches, it can be easy to plant too much in one spot.

Fescue is a favorite for many homeowners and farmers. For example, certain species like red fescue help with erosion control, are great as cover crops, for golf courses, playgrounds, and even pasture for deer, elk, and moose.

Did You Know? Red fescue is actually disliked in some regions because it can become weedy or invasive in some areas, which is why it’s wise to double-check your local NRCS Field Office for its status and use in your area.

Still, fine fescue is one of the most popular and widespread grass seeds in the U.S. It adapts well in various climates since it’s about to tolerate cold, heat, drought, and shade. It’s a great addition to lawns that need that extra resilience and durability, thriving in zones 2 through 7.

Nature’s Seed Can Make the Difference

When it comes to yard care, you want to make sure your home has the healthiest lawn on the block, which starts with the best grass seed. And although pristine lawn care can seem overwhelming, it’s effortless thanks to Nature’s Seeds easy-to-use Seed Selector tool.

Instead of choosing the cheapest brand name at your local big-box stores, it’s essential to understand the ingredients in your seed so you know you’re buying something high-quality for your lawn.

The good news is that it’s easy to buy quality grass seed thanks to Nature’s Seed. We exclusively provide premium quality seeds with varieties only top-rated by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program. Choose from any of our categories to start shopping now!

About our Lawn Grass Seed

The Nature’s Seed Difference

The Nature’s Seed Difference

Nature’s Seed only stocks turf varieties that have been top-rated by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP). These elite varieties have been bred for superior genetic traits such as color, density, drought tolerance, and disease and pest resistant. You won’t find these varieties at big-box stores.

Once we’ve acquired the best seed possible, we submit it to rigorous quality controls including custom cleaning, purity, and viability testing performed by independent seed laboratories. And unlike other seed companies, we sell all our grass seed in PLS (pure live seed). This means you get the exact amount of viable seed that you order, every time.

But which seeds should you choose, and how do you plant them effectively? Below, we share some tips on which grass seed types to choose, when to seed your lawn, and how to choose a grass seeder that works for you.

Grass Seed Types

Grass Seed Types

Lawn grass can be classified into two main types: cool-season and warm-season. As you might have guessed, cool-season grasses perform better in the northern half of the United States while warm-season grasses are better adapted to the southern half.

The most popular cool-season lawn grasses include Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, and fescues. Some of the most popular warm-season grasses include bermudagrass, zoysiagrass, buffalograss, and bahia.

What about the transitional zone where the northern half of the country meets the southern half? In these areas, both cool and warm-season types can be used — although we usually recommend a tall fescue blend for better coverage.

When to Seed Lawn

When to Seed Lawn

After you’ve determined if you’ll be using cool-season or warm-season species, you’re ready to determine your planting date.

Ideally, cool-season grasses should be planted in the spring or fall when your average high temperatures between 60-75 degrees. Warm-season grasses should be planted in the spring or early summer when your average high temperatures are above 80 degrees.

Lawn Grass Seeders

THERE ARE SEVERAL DIFFERENT MAKES AND MODELS OF SEED SPREADERS:
Hand-held Broadcast Spreaders

These are some of the most common and least expensive types of spreaders available. The spreader is held with one hand while the other hand cranks on a handle, flinging the seed over a distance as you walk across an area. These spreaders work great for smaller lawns, but aren’t practical for large lawns or sports fields. Flow rate accuracy and quality can also be questionable on some models.

Tow Behind/Push Broadcast Spreader

These types of spreaders fling seed just like the hand-held versions, but are wheeled across the ground instead of carried and are much more efficient for large areas. However, what you make up for in speed and efficiency you lose in precision. Best used for large open areas.

Drop Spreaders

Drop spreaders are also wheeled and pushed/towed along the ground, but instead of flinging seed over a distance they “drop” seed from the bottom of the spreader in a very precise, controlled manner. Drop spreaders are an excellent choice for seeding irregularly shaped lawns and keeping seed out of flower beds, sidewalks, etc. but are more time-consuming than broadcast spreaders.

See also  How To Germinate Weed Seeds Without Paper Towels
Slit Seeders

Slit seeders are engine-powered machines that cut small groves into the soil and place the seed directly into these slits all in one pass. They offer unmatched efficiency, accuracy, and seed-to-soil contact and produce some of the best results, but are tricky in tight areas. Used extensively by professionals and can also be rented by homeowners.

Lawn Grass Seed Faqs

How long does it take for grass seed to grow & germinate?

Different grass species take different amounts of time to germinate (sprout). Here’s the most common lawn grasses listed from quickest to slowest. Keep in mind that these times are for seeds planted under ideal conditions – temperature, moisture levels, etc. If planted under less-than ideal conditions these times could be longer.

Perennial Ryegrass: 5-10 days

Fine Fescue: 7-12 days

Tall Fescue: 7-12 days

Buffalograss: 7-14 days

Zoysia Grass: 7-21 days

Bahia Grass: 10-14 days

Bermudagrass: 10-30 days

Kentucky Bluegrass: 14-30 days

How long is grass seed good for?

When stored in a cool, dry place and away from all temperature extremes, grass seed should last between 10-18 months from the testing date without a significant decrease in the germination rate. After this time the seed can still be used, but each year after that will see the germination rate drop. Most sources report a 10-20% decrease for every year grass seed is stored.

How much grass seed per acre?

Nature’s Seed sells turfgrass blends by the coverage area. These sizes range from 500 sq. ft. to 5000 sq. ft. and are based on our recommended seeding rates for each species. However, we know lawns come it larger sizes especially if you’re planting a park or sports field. For areas over 10,000 sq. ft. in size, please contact us for the best prices possible.

Here’s a handy guide for planting grass seed by the acre based on our recommended seeding rates for each of our turf blends.

Blue Ribbon Kentucky Bluegrass Blend: 218 lbs./acre

Velvet Blue Blend: 131 lbs./acre

Northeast Seed Blend: 131 lbs./acre

Northwest Seed Blend: 349 lbs./acre

Sun & Shade Blend: 262 lbs./acre

Perennial Ryegrass Blend: 436 lbs./acre

Fine Fescue Seed Blend: 349 lbs./acre

Triple-Play Tall Fescue Blend: 523 lbs./acre

Low Maintenance Seed Blend: 262 lbs./acre

Bahia Grass Seed Blend: 218 lbs./acre

Bermudagrass Seed Blend: 175 lbs./acre

Buffalograss Seed Blend: 131 lbs./acre

Zoysia Grass Seed Blend: 88 lbs./acre

How often to water grass seed?

When your lawn is just starting out you should keep the area constantly moist, but not soaked, until the new grass is two inches tall. This is usually accomplished by watering 2-3 times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time. After this, begin cutting back until you’re watering every other day. After a few weeks of this, cut back to three times a week. Once your lawn is fully established you can follow a more permanent schedule but remember infrequent, deep watering is better for your lawn than frequent, shallow watering. Watering every day not only encourages weed growth, it can also lead to a shallow root system since the roots have no reason to grow deeply to find moisture. This makes the grass more susceptible to drought stress if water suddenly becomes unavailable, like when water restrictions are put in place or natural precipitation fails to fall. Shallow roots are also more prone to pest problems, traffic damage, and diseases. Instead, water deeply enough to saturate the soil to a depth of 6-8 inches. Do this once or twice a week max. To find out if you’re watering deep enough, grab a shovel and start watering you lawn. Dig up a small section of your lawn every 15 minutes to find out how long it takes for water to seep 6-8 inches down. Once you know how long it takes, set your sprinkler system to water for that duration every time.

How to best plant grass seed in the spring?

While fall planting is the ideal time for cool-season turfgrasses such as Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass and fescue, springtime can be very successful too. For warm-season grasses like bermudagrass, buffalograss, zoysia grass and bahia, late spring is the best time.

Step 1 – Prepare the area by killing off and/or removing the old lawn or existing vegetation. This can be accomplished using a tiller, sod cutter, or with a glyphosate herbicide. If you use a tiller or sod cutter, break up any soil clumps and rake the area smooth. If you use glyphosate, wait 2-3 weeks and then remove the dead vegetation. Scalping the area with a string trimmer or lawnmower on the lowest setting does this nicely. Follow this up with a vigorous raking to loosen and smooth out the soil.

Step 2 – Sow the seed using a seed spreader. Hand sowing can work for smaller areas, but larger areas should be planted with a mechanical spreader. Follow the spreader manufacture’s recommended settings for the type of seed you’re using. Most manufactures list their settings on their websites.

Step 3 – After sowing the seed work it into the soil by raking lightly or by pressing it into the soil using a lawn roller.

Step 4 – In arid climates, apply a thin layer of mulch to help the soil retain moisture (optional).

Step 5 – Keep the soil constantly moist, but not soaked, until the new grass is two inches tall. This is usually accomplished by watering 2-3 times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time.

How to plant grass seed on existing lawn?

Planting into existing grass, also known as overseeding, is one of the best ways to rejuvenate an existing lawn. Not only does overseeding help bare and thin areas fill in, it also introduces newer turfgrass varieties into older lawns. These newer varieties bring with them added resistance to pests and diseases, and improve the overall quality of the lawn. Overseeding can be accomplished in three steps:

Prepare the area by mowing your lawn shorter than usual and removing the clippings. This is important for achieving adequate seed-to-soil contact. For even better results, consider having your lawn core-aerated prior to overseeding.

Sow the seed using a spreader. For overseeding purposes you only need to use half the recommended seeding rate. For example, if the seeding rate was 5 lbs. /1000 sq. ft. for establishing a new lawn, the seeding rate for overseeding an existing lawn would be 2.5 lbs. /1000 sq. ft.

Keep the area constantly moist, but not soaked, while the new seed germinates. Continue this until the new grass reaches the height of your existing grass. Continue to mow as needed but try to limit the traffic on your lawn during this time.

How to plant grass seed on hard dirt?

Trying to plant grass seed on hard, compacted soil is challenging. Whatever you do, don’t bring in topsoil and spread it over the hard soil. While it may look like the problem is solved and your grass will even germinate and start to establish, that compacted layer will play havoc with the drainage, root development, and overall vigor of your grass later. However, if you can bring in enough new soil to bury the compacted soil at least 2-3 feet deep than this idea can work, but that much soil over a large area is usually not practical.

The best solution is to incorporate organic matter into the compacted soil at a depth of at least 6 inches, deeper if possible. Organic matter can include compost, lawn clippings, shredded leaves, aged manure, etc. Tilling is often the only way to incorporate this matter into the soil. Make sure the soil isn’t wet or it could do more harm than good. However, a slightly moist soil will make for easier tilling than bone dry soil will. In the future having the area core-aerated yearly will help avoid more compaction.

How to spread grass seed evenly?

The best way to sow grass seed, and the way we strongly recommend, is with a mechanical spreader. These spreaders come in many varieties but all function the same basic way. By adjusting the distribution rate these device help to ensure a uniform, consistent spread. This consistency makes for a more efficient use of grass seed and eliminates the patchiness often resulting from hand spreading. Here is a closer look at the different types of mechanical spreaders on the market:

Hand-held Broadcast Spreaders – These are some of the most common and least expensive types of spreaders available. The spreader is held with one hand while the other hand cranks on a handle, flinging the seed over a distance as you walk across an area. These spreaders work great for smaller lawns but aren’t practical for large lawns or sports fields. Flow rate accuracy and quality can also be questionable on some models.

Tow Behind/Push Broadcast Spreader – These types of spreaders fling seed just like the hand-held versions, but are wheeled across the ground instead of carried and are much more efficient for large areas. However, what you make up for in speed and efficiency you lose in precision. Best used for large open areas.

Drop Spreaders – Drop spreaders are also wheeled and pushed/towed along the ground, but instead of flinging seed over a distance they “drop” seed from the bottom of the spreader in a very precise, controlled manner. Drop spreaders are an excellent choice for seeding irregularly shaped lawns and keeping seed out of flower beds, sidewalks, etc. but are more time-consuming than broadcast spreaders.

Slit Seeders – Slit seeders are engine-powered machines that cut small groves into the soil and place the seed directly into these slits all in one pass. They offer unmatched efficiency, accuracy, and seed-to-soil contact and produce some of the best results, but are tricky in tight areas. Used extensively by professionals and can also be rented by homeowners.

What is the best grass seed for shade?

Most grasses prefer full-sun (8+ hours of sunlight a day), and some grasses can handle part-sun (4-6 hours of sunlight a day). But for areas that receive 2-4 hours a day, fine fescue is the best choice for northern climates. Unfortunately, if you have an area that receives less than 2 hours of sunlight a day you might need to consider a different type of groundcover.

For shady areas in the southern half of the United States your options are very limited. Warm-season grasses perform best in these southern areas, but warm-season grasses are also known for being intolerant of shade. Some varieties of zoysia can tolerant part-sun conditions, but the most shade-tolerant warm-season grass is St. Augustine (not available in seed form). St. Augustine grass has some drawbacks however, so be sure to do your homework before considering this type of lawn.

What is the best way to plant grass seed in the fall?

Late summer and early fall is the prime time for planting cool-season grasses like Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, and fescue. Soil temperatures are warm and nights are cool which encourages quick germination and rabid establishment. Fall also happens to be the beginning of the wetter season throughout much of the United States, and soil moisture levels are near perfect. However, fall is not a good time for planting warm-season grasses like bermudagrass, buffalograss, zoysia grass, or bahia. Wait until late spring for these types of grasses.

Step 1 – Prepare the area by killing off and/or removing the old lawn or existing vegetation. This can be accomplished using a tiller, sod cutter, or with a glyphosate herbicide. If you use a tiller or sod cutter, break up any soil clumps and rake the area smooth. If you use glyphosate, wait 2-3 weeks and then remove the dead vegetation. Scalping the area with a string trimmer or lawnmower on the lowest setting does this nicely. Follow this up with a vigorous raking to loosen and smooth out the soil.

Step 2 – Sow the seed using a seed spreader. Hand sowing can work for smaller areas, but larger areas should be planted with a mechanical spreader. Follow the spreader manufacture’s recommended settings for the type of seed you’re using. Most manufactures list their settings on their websites.

Step 3 – After sowing the seed work it into the soil by raking lightly or by pressing it into the soil using a lawn roller.

Step 4 – In arid climates, apply a thin layer of mulch to help the soil retain moisture (optional).

Step 5 – Keep the soil constantly moist, but not soaked, until the new grass is two inches tall. This is usually accomplished by watering 2-3 times a day for 5-10 minutes at a time.

What to cover grass seed with?

Covering an area with mulch after seeding can be beneficial when establishing a new lawn. While it’s not a requirement it can help the soil retain moisture. This is especially helpful in dry, arid parts of the country. There are many different types of mulches available ranging from peat moss, straw, compost, recycled paper, etc. We strongly recommend against peat moss as its use contributes to wetland destruction. Straw is a cheap option, but make sure it comes from a weed-free source or else you could introduce weed seeds into your new lawn. Spreading one 80 lb. bale per 1000 square feet is adequate. The best option is our professional-grade Seed Aide Cover Grow – water retaining seed starting mulch. This mulch combines post-consumer recycled paper, recycled clean whole-wood mulch, organic tackifier, and bio-stimulant for superior seed establishment.

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Where does grass come from?

Nature’s Seed uses an extensive network of grass seed producers from around the country, but the majority of the cool-season grass seeds we use were grown and harvested in the Pacific Northwest. Oregon is the largest supplier of cool-season grass seeds in the country and is grown and harvested by professional farmers. Here at Nature’s Seed, we select and stock only the best grass varieties based on data gathered by the National Turfgrass Evaluation Program (NTEP).

Best grass seed 2022: The best seed mixes for busy gardens and beautiful lawns

The best lawns start with the best grass seed. We reveal our favourite seed mixes for growing your own lush green carpet

If you want to create a fabulous lawn you’ve got two main options: buy turf (which is expensive) or sow grass seed (which is not). Grass seed is also widely available in more varieties, giving you the freedom to create the kind of lawn you want.

The best grass seed products are a mix of varieties, balanced to meet certain needs and thrive in particular conditions. For example, there are mixes tailored to growing quickly in the UK climate, and others formulated to create the greenest lawn in your street.

In a moment, we’ll reveal the best grass seed mixes available. First, here’s how to choose the right seeds for your garden, or football pitch, or croquet lawn, or for re-grassing those muddy patches you’ve been meaning to sort out for years.

Best grass seed: At a glance

  • Best hardwearing grass seed for busy lawns: Sprogs & Dogs | £15 (1kg)
  • Best fast-growing grass seed: BGW Grass Seed | £12 (1kg)
  • Best all-year round grass seed: Germinal A26 So Green | £15 (500g)
  • Best for overseeding and fixing patches: Groundmaster General Purpose | £10 (1kg)
  • Best low-maintenance grass for gardens: Superstar Back Lawn | £22 (2kg)

How to choose the best grass seed for you

How much will I need to spend?

Good grass seed costs between £10 and £15 per kilo, and covers an average of 30 square metres (or about 50sqm if you’re reseeding an existing lawn). Coverage and price vary, so we’ve given details of both for each seed in our rundown.

Don’t get carried away and buy 5kg when you’re just planting a small front lawn. Too much seed causes overcrowding, which leads to bald patches.

Even the priciest grass seed costs significantly less than buying rolls of turf, but it does require more patience and work to create a lawn from seed than from turf.

What is grass seed made from?

That’s not a silly question, honest. All the products in our line-up are seed mixes, made up of different grass varieties that each have their pros and cons.

To see which varieties each mix contains, check the ‘Key specs’ under each bite-sized review below. We’ve listed the main ingredient first, food label-style.

Three varieties turn up most often in grass seed mixes:

Ryegrass is the most common type of grass seed. It’s coarse, versatile, hard-wearing and fast to grow. Technically speaking it’s a ‘bunch grass’, which means it’s a cool-season grass that thrives in most soil types and conditions.

Fescue is also hardy and versatile but a little finer than ryegrass, so it’s softer beneath your feet and creates a thicker look. It’s also good at growing in the shade, unlike most other grass varieties. Its main downside is that it needs warm soil to germinate, so it won’t grow if sown in cooler months.

Bentgrass is a fine ornamental grass that can be mown very short for a beautiful velvety lawn. It’s rather high-maintenance, so it’s usually mixed with fescue to make the lawn harder-wearing and weed-resistant. Many all-purpose grass seed mixes include a dash of bentgrass to soften the overall look of your lawn.

What grass seed mix is best for me and my garden?

That mainly depends on how you use your lawn and the amount of work you want to put in.

Football pitch vs posh lawn: If your lawn needs to withstand endless close encounters with kids, pets and BBQ guests, then go for a predominantly ryegrass mix. But if you want a smooth ornamental lawn, avoid ryegrass completely and go for bentgrass, with some fescue in the mix to help it survive underfoot.

Sun vs shade: Most types of grass prefer full sun, but fescue is a shade specialist (and will also grow in sunny spots). A ryegrass/fescue mix is the most reliable choice if your garden has shady bits.

Mowing height: Fine ornamental grass can and should be mowed quite close – as low as 1cm. Coarse ryegrass performs better if you let it grow a little more – up to 4cm. That said, any type of newly-sown grass should be left to grow up to around 7cm before you cut it for the first time.

Weeds: Coarse grass is good at competing with weeds, but fine grass isn’t. So, if you have a soft bentgrass lawn you’ll have to work harder to keep weeds at bay.

Soil type: Most UK soil is loam, sand and/or clay. Loam is best for grass because it drains better than clay but holds moisture better than sand. Fescue grasses fare OK in clay-heavy soil, while finer grasses can thrive in sandy soil. To check what type of soil you’ve got, do the jam jar trick.

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The best grass seed to buy

1. Sprogs & Dogs: The best hardwearing grass seed for busy lawns

Price: £15 for 1kg | Buy now from Amazon

This mix of dwarf ryegrass and creeping red fescue has been developed over a decade by Lawn UK to create a thick, “sports strength” turf for lawns that regularly double as football pitches, dog playgrounds and shortcuts to the garage.

The seeds are fairly quick to germinate, especially if you plant them in spring or autumn, with users reporting a “lush green lawn” eight weeks after planting. Long-term user reviews are ecstatic, reporting that the grass grows back well after snowy winters and summer heatwaves. It’s low-maintenance and thrives between mowing.

For one of the cheapest seed mixes in our rundown, Sprogs & Dogs is a clear all-round winner. The only downside is that birds love it, so invest in some netting while your lawn takes root.

Key specs – Seed types: Dwarf ryegrass, creeping red fescue; When to sow: Spring or autumn; Mowing height: Up to 4cm; 1kg covers: Around 30m ²

Sprogs & Dogs Ultra Hardwearing Grass Seed by Lawn UK – Ultimate Grass Seed for Family lawns, Super Durable, Tough Lawn Seed Mixture – Fast Growing (1kg)

2. GBW Grass Seed: The best fast-growing grass seed

Price: £12 for 1kg | Buy now from Amazon

A perennial bestseller in Amazon’s Garden & Outdoors category, this DEFRA-certified grass mixture is designed to grow fast in the UK climate.

We gave these seeds a try and found they worked best after being soaked overnight, then planted in holes in well-prepared ground rather than being chucked on top. We saw shoots within three days of planting in early September. Longer-term users report seeing a full lawn within a month and receiving excellent customer service.

Impressively, GBW emailed us sowing and growing instructions before our seed bag arrived, and we didn’t have to avail ourselves of its promise of a full refund if we weren’t happy.

Key specs – Seed types: Dwarf ryegrass, creeping red fescue, bentgrass; When to sow: Spring/autumn; Mowing height: 1.2cm; 1kg covers: 35m ² (new lawn), 55m ² (existing lawn)

1kg Grass Seed Covers up to 55 m2 (590 ft2) New Lawns – Premium Quality Seed – Fast Growing – Hard Wearing Lawn Seed – Tailored to UK Climate – Trademark Registered – GBW Grass Seed – 100% Refund

3. Germinal A26 So Green: The best grass seed for a green lawn all year round

Price: £15 for 500g | Buy now from Germinal

Usually, you have to choose between a great-looking lawn and a hard-wearing one, but this unique blend is tough and striking.

The secret is in the colour. Germinal is so confident about the world-beating hue of its So Green grass, which uses specially-cultivated Abernile ryegrass, that it planted the stuff on the side of a house for its product photo (above). Yep, that sure is green. And it promises to stay green all year round.

According to long-term users it really does work, maintaining a dark green colour even during droughts. It’s pricey (although still cheaper than buying turf), but it is a reliable grass that gardeners say is particularly good at resisting disease.

Key specs – Seed types: Abernile perennial ryegrass, fescue, bentgrass; When to sow: Spring/autumn; Mowing height: Optimum 2.5cm; 500g covers: 14m ²

4. The Grass People Steadfast Ultra Shade: The best grass seed for shaded areas

Price: £47 for 2kg | Buy now from The Grass People

Steadfast Ultra Shade is one of The Grass People’s more expensive mixes, at £23 per kilo, but it really does reach the parts other grass seeds can’t.

It contains unusual grass varieties cultivated for areas that never get direct sun, such as under trees or below fences in built-up areas. Ingredients include smooth-stalked meadowgrass (‘poa pratensis’), a deep-rooted grass that’s great at surviving drought and cold, and a super-strong variety of bluegrass (‘poa supina’) that thrives in shade. If this stuff doesn’t grow under your tree, nothing will.

The main downsides are that it’s slow to establish, and the ryegrass-free mix requires warmer temperatures to germinate. Sow it in spring and you should see a healthy growth in early summer.

Key specs – Seed types: Smooth-stalked meadowgrass, chewings fescue, supina bluegrass; When to sow: May-September; Mowing height: Around 2cm; 1kg covers: 20m ²

The Grass People SUPER STEADFAST: Ultra Shade 2kg – Grass Seed, Lawn Seed, For Shaded Gardens with No Light, Heavily Shaded Lawns with Overhanging Trees, Shrubbery, Hedges, Gable Walls, Brilliant for Built Up Areas

5. GroundMaster General Purpose: The best grass seed for overseeding and fixing patches

Price: £10 for 1kg | Buy now from Amazon

This ryegrass-fescue seed mix has been cultivated to germinate in difficult weather or terrain conditions, as long as you water it every night. You won’t need to do much ground preparation: just sprinkle it on your lawn’s patches and cover with netting (it’s very tasty, according to our local feathered friends).

Some users report slow germination (“don’t panic, it took a good month”) but this mix creates a lovely dark green grass if you’re patient. The main drawback is the dark green may contrast with your existing lawn if you’re patching.

Key specs – Seed types: Perennial ryegrass, creeping red fescue; When to sow: Year round but ideally during warm humid weather; Mowing height: Up to 4cm; 1kg covers: 30m ²

GroundMaster General Purpose Lawn Garden Grass Seed (1KG)

6. The Grass People Superstar Back Lawn: Great low-maintenance grass for gardens

Price: £22 for 2kg | Buy now from The Grass People

This great value all-purpose seed mix is similar to Sprogs & Dogs but in our experience was a little slower to germinate. Plant the seeds in humid weather in April for best results.

With patience you’ll get a lovely low-maintenance lawn that’s happy to grow to 4cm or more before you need to get the mower out. And if you need proof that it’s hard-wearing enough to withstand lots of heavy trampling, it’s undergone extensive testing by third-party researchers including the Sports Turf Research Institute.

Key specs – Seed types: Perennial ryegrass; creeping red fescue; When to sow: Wet humid weather, ideally April; Mowing height: Up to 4cm; 1kg covers: 20m ²

The Grass People Superstar: Back Lawn 10kg Grass Seed Lawn Seed Perfect for Families, Luxury Lawn, Quality Lawn, Hard Wearing and Attractive Grass Lawn

7. Lawnsmith Ornamental Grass Seed: The best grass seed for a perfect-looking lawn

Price: £25 for 2kg | Buy now from Lawnsmith

There’s no ryegrass in this seed mix, just bentgrass and a couple of fescue varieties. The result is a beautifully fine, dense lawn that looks like a glorious green carpet, although it needs regular close mowing to look its best. And perhaps a ‘Keep off the grass’ sign or three.

The seeds germinate quickly, with initial shoots appearing in days, but growth rate is slow and you’ll need to be very vigilant about weeds. As with most fine grasses, Lawnsmith’s ornamental mix thrives best in sandy (free-draining) acidic soil.

Key specs – Contains grass types: Chewings fescue, red fescue, bentgrass; When to sow: Spring/autumn; Mowing height: 1-2cm; 1kg covers: 20m ²