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good music to listen to while high

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Spotify notes that 75% of the 40,000-plus playlists on Spotify with a ‘420’ theme in their titles are created by males, with the service getting Willie Nelson and Method Man to curate two 420 playlists of their own for 4/20 back in April.
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Kendrick Lamar’s ‘Bitch, Don’t Kill My Vibe’ is the sixth most-listened to 420 track, while Notorious B.I.G’s ‘Juicy’ and Snoop Dogg’s ‘Gin And Juice’ are in there too.
Sadly, a lot of novelty tracks and obvious ones that reference marijuana in the title are in there – Afroman ‘Because I Got High’, Cypress Hill ‘Hits From The Bong’, that sort of thing – though there are a few less overt choices.
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Over 40,000 playlists have been created around a ‘420’ theme on the streaming service, which we can safely assume relate to weed, and these were analysed by frequency of track.
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The 20 most-streamed tracks from all the 420 playlists:

Smoking weed and listening to music have always gone hand-in-hand, so Spotify recently decided to take an empirical look at the relationship. Over 40,000 playlists have been created around a ‘420’ theme on the streaming service, which we can safely assume relate to weed, and these were analysed by frequency of track.

Good music to listen to while high

If you’re a hip-hop fan or strictly listen to opera on vinyl, you will get more bang for your buck with the addition of cannabinoids. Daniel J. Levitin, music psychologist and professor of Psychology and Behavioral Neuroscience at McGill University, wrote in his book The World in Six Songs that THC’s potential to make listeners feel euphoric and disrupt short-term memory allows listens to be more in the moment and “hear music from note to note.”

Does that mean these musicians have the best songs to listen to high? Not necessarily, but they have managed to be important musical artists within many pro-cannabis communities and the larger weed culture. Some people enjoy listening to the same music they normally listen to while enjoying cannabis products. Some people like to listen to Afro Man’s “Because I Got High.” To each their own!
What constitutes the best songs to listen to when high? Just like munchies, this all comes down to personal preference. It’s safe to assume that if you already love a song, experiencing it while high might kick it up a few notches, but being buzzed is also a perfect time to experiment with something new.

Sensations like taste, sight and sound, are often felt more intensely with almost any intoxicant, even coffee can alter our perception. Cannabis has had a reputation for providing this enhancement for generations — ancient civilizations used it to increase sensory experiences.

  • Snoop Dogg
  • Dr. Dre
  • Pink Floyd
  • Bob Marley
  • Jimi Hendrix
  • Grateful Dead
  • Method Man
  • Cypress Hill
  • Tame Impala
  • Kendrick Lamar
  • Flaming Lips
  • Wiz Khalifa
  • Berner

Here are several musicians who are popular within the cannabis community:
As for what you should listen to while partaking, one thing we can suggest is to focus on pro-pot artists. Every penny that you send to a cannabis-friendly musician or performer helps them accrue money, new listeners, click power and other ways to help you evangelize cannabis, via music stars.
Neurologist Alice Flaherty researches creativity. She told Mic.com, “No one quite understands it, but the cannabinoid receptors seem to be involved in producing a watchful, alert state.” This vigilance means that some people experience a richer sensory response to auditory stimuli like music, rendering it more enjoyable for some, provided it’s the right type of music.

That sounds a bit scary, but it just means to use care when consuming, as too much sensory enhancement is overwhelming for some people. For example, though you may want music to sound better, you don’t want to smell strong odors with more intensity at the same time.

What constitutes the best songs to listen to when high? Just like munchies, this all comes down to personal musical preference.