Fertilize Weed Seeds

Our detailed guide to some of the best fertilizers available for your marijuana garden, including how to make your own organic blends. Follow Kate Van Druff’s advice on growing conditions, nutrients, and fertilizer to get your seedlings to the next level. The first fertilizer or feed of a marijuana seeds life is one of the most important. Remember the marijuana seedling is very tender. Keep this in mind when

The Most Popular Fertilizers for Growing Cannabis [Guide]

With an increase in the number of states where people are legally allowed to grow marijuana, it was inevitable that the fertilizer market would take off. Without the right fertilizers and nutrients, there is no hope of your weed producing fat buds. While you need to be careful not to overdo it and cause nutrient burn, a lack of fertilizer will ultimately harm your plant.

In this guide, we look at the best fertilizers and provide a quick guide on making your own.

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Homegrown CannabisCo

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

Vermiculite and Perlite

While these materials are often considered to be interchangeable, they are different entities. They are both relatively sterile inorganic products but look and act differently. Perlite is hard and porous and is made by heating volcanic glass to an extremely high temperature. Vermiculite is soft and spongy and made by heating mica to an incredibly high temperature.

Perlite is normally white, traps water, and has a slightly alkaline pH. Vermiculite is tan or brown, absorbs water, and has an almost neutral pH. The two materials are often sold together despite their differences, and the combination absorbs water up to four times its weight.

These materials are ideal for preventing your soil from hardening when it dries.

Most importantly perhaps, vermiculite and perlite provide calcium, magnesium, and potassium, which gets into the soil and nourishes your marijuana. If you have a hydroponics setup, you can create a fertilizer that includes 50% of perlite and vermiculite, with the rest made up of peat moss and water. If you are using soil, you only need 10% of perlite and vermiculite in your fertilizer.

Human Urine

As bizarre as it sounds, your urine is a fantastic fertilizer for your marijuana plants. Fresh human urine is high in nitrogen, one of the key nutrients in weed growth. The breakdown of your urine depends on your diet. If you follow a ‘Western’ diet, the nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium (NPK) ratio is 11-1-2. For reference, blood meal is 12-2-1.

As urine contains a lot of salt, it must be diluted to a ratio of at least one-part urine, 10 parts water. DO NOT URINATE DIRECTLY ON THE PLANTS! It will probably kill them. If you plan to use your wee on potted plants or seedlings, dilute the urine to a 1:20 ratio in water.

It should go without saying that you must only use your urine if you are healthy. Don’t use it if you are on medication or have a urinary tract infection. By the way, if you are grossed out by the thought of using urine, how do you feel about bat guano or cow poop?

Wood Ashes

Yet another unexpected fertilizer, wood ash contains ample potassium and lime for your plants. Believe it or not, you can even use the ashes from your fireplace, assuming you have burned wood. You can lightly scatter the ashes on your plants, or add them to a compost heap. One issue is that the ash will produce high amounts of salt and lye if it gets wet.

It is also important to note that ashes from hardwood trees, such as maple and oak, contain more nutrients than ash from other trees, on average. Wood ash also acts as an effective pesticide by keeping slugs, snails, and other soft-bodied invertebrates at bay.

Bat Guano

A fancy term for bat poo, guano has been used as a soil enricher for eons. You can also use manure from other animals including chickens and cows. Bat guano is often worked into the soil or made into compost tea. Bat guano’s NPK ratio is 10-3-1 which vegetative stage. Chicken manure releases nutrients slowly and can enhance yield.

Fish Meal

Fish meal is typically made from ground-up parts of the fish that are inedible. The result is a fine powder that can be added to your soil. Fish emulsion is pressed fish oil. When combined with the meal, it prolongs the release of the nutrients. Fish meal is high in nitrogen. Alternatives include blood, bone, and soy meal.

Worm Castings

This is what comes out of an earthworm once it digests soil or other organic components. It is laden with tiny organisms and loaded with nutrients. It is commonly added to compost tea because adding it directly to weed, especially during the flowering stage, could result in your marijuana tasting like worm feces.

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Homegrown CannabisCo

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

Composting

Experienced gardeners know that organic material will ultimately grow back into the soil, and take with it the nutrients in the original matter. You could compost kitchen waste and other organic materials and expect to be rewarded with wonderfully fertile soil. As well as boosting your plant’s growth, composting reduces your landfill contribution and enriches the soil in your locality.

Your compost heap can contain anything; as long as it is organic.

This means the food you throw out, chicken manure, worm castings, and bone meal. After you have created your compost heap, turn the compost with a pitchfork (daily if possible) until the contents have been properly mixed. By doing this, you maximize decomposition and reduce the time it takes for the heap to become usable. As a rule of thumb, you can expect it to take three months for your compost to become usable.

See also  Weed With Flat Round Seed Pods

You can also create a compost tea, which is basically a liquid version of your compost heap. You need organic molasses, organic compost, water, a bucket, and a few other materials. It normally takes around three days to make, and you should use it as soon as possible.

Hydroponics

If you have a hydroponics setup, it means you are using a growing medium such as Rockwool or coco coir instead of soil. As a result, you need store-bought nutrients made especially for hydroponics. These nutrients will contain no organic matter as they are provided through minerals, and should contain optimum NPK ratios.

With marijuana, you need high nitrogen, medium phosphorus, and high potassium during the vegetative stage. During the flowering stage, you need high phosphorus and potassium, and low nitrogen. What you buy must also contain various micronutrients such as iron, copper, boron, sulfur, manganese, and magnesium.

Carbon Dioxide Boosting

The process of photosynthesis involves plants using oxygen, sunlight, and carbon dioxide (CO2) to create energy. When you increase the CO2 in your grow room, you boost your marijuana plants’ growth. One of the simplest ways to achieve this is by using white vinegar and baking soda. Set it up so that one drop of vinegar falls into a bowl of baking soda every two minutes, and marvel at the CO2 increase in the room.

In an outdoor setting, you need to improvise as the smell of vinegar could land you in trouble with the authorities. A useful CO2 increasing technique involves placing a large plastic bag over the plant. Then, fill an empty plastic jar with baking soda until it is 25% full. Put the open jar beneath the tent created by the plastic bag.

Pour a tablespoon of vinegar into the jar until it begins to foam, a sign that it is generating CO2. Reseal the bag, allow the plant to breathe for a quarter of an hour and add more vinegar to what’s left of the baking soda. Stir with a stick and leave the bag over the plant for at least four hours.

If you are growing indoors, you could invest in a CO2 cylinder or a generator.

Synthetic or Organic Fertilizer?

There are tried and trusted products such as Miracle-Gro that are worth buying if you are a novice grower. Over time, however, you will learn that pre-packaged products are expensive and wasteful, not to mention bad for the environment. Once you learn how to create your own organic fertilizer, there’s a danger you will get addicted!

As well as saving a small fortune, you learn so much more about plant nutrition, and gain an understanding of what your plants need, and when. Eventually, this knowledge will lead to larger yields and more potent buds. The key is to determine what nutrients each organic element brings. For example:

  • Nitrogen: Worm castings, bat guano, human urine, and chicken manure.
  • Phosphorus: Bone and fish meals, rock dust, and banana peels.
  • Potassium: Fish meal, wood ash, and kelp.
  • Calcium: Clay, gypsum, and limestone.
  • Magnesium: Epsom salts and dolomite.

When Should I Stop Fertilizing?

Make sure you create a feed chart to discover what happens when you feed specific nutrients to your plants at set growth stages. If the leaves of your marijuana plants are turning yellow or look burnt long before harvest, it could be a case of nitrogen burn. Check your feed chart to see if it is a likely reason.

If your plants are being overfed, perform a flush with pH neutral water, but don’t do it in the week before forcing the plants into flowering.

Keep an eye out for deficiencies but resist the urge to add extra fertilizer. Marijuana plants often need fewer nutrients than you think. Perform a flush any time from two weeks away from harvest, or else your weed could taste of fertilizer!

Final Thoughts on Marijuana Fertilizers

If you see yellow leaves near the base of your plants as harvest time approaches, there’s no need to panic as that’s a normal occurrence. It is all too easy to overfeed your plants and cause nutrient burn, an issue that could damage your plant permanently, at least in an aesthetic sense.

If you are using a store-bought fertilizer, begin with half of the recommended dose unless there are clear signs of nutrient deficiency. The amount of nutrients your plant needs depends on the marijuana strain. When using organic fertilizer, start small and gradually increase the dose as and when it is needed.

Although you can use ready-made fertilizers as a novice, it is best to educate yourself on the topic and learn how to create organic fertilizers. Not only will it be better for the soil, and the environment in the long-term, it also helps you gain valuable insight into the world of gardening. The more knowledge you possess, the more likely it is that you will grow bigger plants and enjoy greater yields.

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Homegrown CannabisCo

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

See also  Weed Seed Starting Kit

Knowing When to Start Seedlings on Fertilizer and Nutrients

Delicate seedlings need a little extra attention and knowledge to help them grow big and strong. Follow Kate Van Druff’s advice on growing conditions, nutrients, and fertilizer to get your seedlings to the next level.

Few things about gardening are as gratifying as watching a tiny seed become a flourishing plant. Flowers, herbs, fruit, vegetables, ornamentals — the possibilities of what you can grow are endless and the journey is memorable year after year.

Many variables come into play as simple seeds start their lifecycles. Starting seeds indoors or outside relies on factors such as the climate and natural or artificial lighting conditions. The timing of planting also comes into play, where seedlings started indoors too early in the season and without suitable lighting can become leggy and thin rather than healthy and robust. Of course, the selected planting medium can also impact the quality of the seedlings you grow, where some potting mixes contain nutrients right from the start and others are merely, well, dirt.

Finding the perfect balance of growing conditions and nutrients isn’t always easy.

This article will help you to discover the best nutrients and fertilizers for your seedlings and when you should apply them.

Understanding Essential Macronutrients for Seedlings

Introducing fertilizers and nutrients for seedlings can boost growth and production for your plants. Plants require many different nutrients to thrive, particularly oxygen, hydrogen, carbon, which they get through water and air, as well as potassium, phosphorus, and nitrogen, which need to be added through fertilization. These key nutrients tend to be the most important, but you’ll also want to consider micronutrients that can also fortify your seedlings for their best potential.

Nitrogen (N)

As the single most important nutrient for plants, nitrogen is responsible for plant growth, and more specifically leaf growth, plant size, and overall health. Plants supplied with sufficient nitrogen will grow strong and quickly. Nitrogen also plays a key role in photosynthesis, serving as a component of the chlorophyll molecule that makes plants green. As seedlings grow into larger plants, the demand for nitrogen also grows.

Phosphorus (P)

Also vitally important, phosphorus aids plants in creating strong roots, making seeds, and producing fruit, vegetables, and flowers. Phosphorus also aids in photosynthesis by facilitating the plant’s energy transfer and allowing plants to use or store energy. Demand for this nutrient is greatest during seed germination and early life, as well as during fruiting or flowering. General weakness and stunted growth are two signs of phosphorous deficiency in plants.

Potassium (K)

The next most essential plant nutrient after nitrogen, potassium helps with many aspects of plant growth and development, such as a plant’s size, shape, and color, not to mention the taste of any produce. Adding potassium to the soil helps plants with the protein synthesis process as well as the activation of growth enzymes.

Growth-related issues such as leaf loss, cholrosis (scorching of leaves), weak root systems, and stunted growth may present when plants become too deficient in potassium.

Seedlings and plants also tend to need a large amount of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur. These complete the list of essential macronutrients commonly required for plants and crops.

    – Calcium strengthens plant tissues and helps to neutralize soil and plant acidity. Calcium in the soil also helps improve water penetration and decrease the soil’s salinity.

– This nutrient also helps give plants their green color, increasing the intake of phosphorus, increases chlorophyll, and allows better CO2 absorption.

– Sulfur helps plants produce seeds and resist disease. This nutrient also promotes growth, production of chlorophyll, and helps in producing proteins, amino acids, and enzymes.

Together, these six essential macronutrients aid in the creation of chlorophyll, which helps plants convert light into energy for photosynthesis. The process of photosynthesis allows plants to take sunlight, CO2, and water and turn them into sugar and oxygen. The glucose created then affords plants the ability to use that energy to grow and repair damage or to store it for later. Better photosynthesis enables plants to be more prolific, with better growth and larger and more bountiful yields. Ensuring proper macronutrient fertilization has a direct impact on plant growth and your future harvest potential.

Best Micronutrients for Seedlings

After you monitor and amend the soil for proper macronutrient content, remember that many diverse nutrients can benefit your plants. As you become a more experienced gardener, you may begin to recognize signs that your plants are craving specific nutrients. You should consider these other key micronutrients to inspire balanced nutrition for your plants.

    supports a plant’s membranes in terms of structure and function. helps in vitamin A production as well as protein synthesis along with other growth processes. aids in food production, energy transfer, and overall growth, to name a few. supports quicker germination, photosynthesis, and aids in various metabolic reactions. supports nitrogen fixation. is especially vital as it supports high yields in crops.
  • Nickel is essential in urea conversion.
  • Chloride supports plant energy reactions.

Plants need lesser concentrations of these micronutrients, yet their presence can have a great impact. Even a slight deficiency in one micronutrient can impact a plant’s overall health and growth. Adding organic compost can be an effective way to increase micronutrients in the garden.

When Can Seedlings First Have Nutrients?

The soil where your seeds start can have an impact on the future growth of your plants. Generally speaking, seedlings won’t need their nutrients until their first full set of true leaves sprouts. Those first leaves that emerge, called cotyledons, are actually part of the seed and will deliver nutrients to get the seedlings started. The cotyledons feed the plant, so you don’t necessarily need to start feeding right away.

Once the true leaves appear, you may wish to transfer the seedlings from their current spot to a larger pot or a cell pack. At this point, you can use some potting mix with built-in nutrients, or you may wish to choose your own fertilizer to apply at regular intervals. A diluted, water-soluble fertilizer can deliver essential nutrients for the young plants as they grow. Dissolving fertilizer in water makes it so easy to feed your plants as needed. You can monitor your seedlings to decide if lightly fertilizing once or twice per week works best. Signs of over-fertilizing may include yellowing leaves, slowed growth, wilting, or buildup of salt. If you’ve used a potting mix with nutrients already mixed into the soil, proceed slowly with any additional fertilizing efforts to avoid harming the plants.

Nourishment Timeline for Baby Plants

Germinate seeds in starter containers or packs. Choose between plain potting medium or nutrient-enriched potting mix.

  • Plain Potting Mix: After the first set of “true leaves” emerges, apply diluted, water-soluble fertilizer only to seedlings not already fortified with nutrient-rich soil.
  • For a more organic fertilizer route, consider using nitrogen-rich blood meal, phosphorous-rich bone meal, and potassium-rich kelp meal.
  • As another natural option, you may also wish to make your own compost.
  • Nutrient-Rich Potting Mix: When starting from potting mix with added fertilizer, wait six to eight weeks and then supplement the nutrient-rich potting mix with a little fertilizer.
  • Look for clues that your plants may be craving nitrogen, such as yellowing or slowed growth before adding more fertilizer.

Words of Caution When Fertilizing Young Plants

Using too much fertilizer too early on can burn young plants and their roots. It’s best to proceed with caution, adding a little fertilizer at a time and increasing as the plants grow and mature. Remember, you can always add more fertilizer, but you can’t really undo overfertilization.

You may also wish to have your soil tested prior to fertilizing so you know about any nutrient deficiencies that you should work to correct. Your healthy plants and yields will thank you for it!

Read also: Super Starts: Healthier Transplants for Happier Harvests

It may be true that anyone can stick a seed in a bit of soil, add some water and sunlight, and watch it grow. There’s a lot more to it, though. Pay attention each planting season to discover what works best as you familiarize yourself with each different plant you like to grow and which applications produce the best results.

With a solid understanding of nutrients, fertilizers, and growing conditions, you can cultivate stronger, healthier, and more vigorous plants year after year.

When To Marijuana Fertilize Seedlings

The first fertilizer or feed of a marijuana seeds life is one of the most important. Remember the marijuana seedling is very tender. Keep this in mind when prepping your first marijuana fertilizer formula. Over marijuana feeding a seedling will kill it.

Be very careful.
Under marijuana fertilizer is better and gradually work your way to full strength formula.

Preparing soil with marijuana fertilizer before planting your cannabis seeds is a great idea. Many marijuana growers do this. Preparing the soil for planting is critical to your marijuana seeds success, but some growers do opt to skip this step. Preferring instead to feed early in the marijuana plant growth cycle.

Mixes composed of perlite, vermiculite, and rockwool and other inert media should be treated with a mild application, 300-400ppm, of fertilizer prior to marijuana seed introduction.

By preparing soil before planting the first feeding won’t need to happen for sometime.

Feed young marijuana seedlings in soil a 1/4 to 1/2 strength solution of marijuana fertilizer after two to three weeks or after the first set of true leaves appear but only if the soil is not super hot in terms of nutrients.

Generally speaking the fourth week of the marijuana seeds vegetative cycle is a good time to feed.

Though examine your plants in the third week for signs of deficiencies and feed accordingly. Also plants should be several internodes high by this point.

Adding marijuana fertilizer Hormex, Superthrive or some other auxin/vitamin based supplement will accelerate early plant development. It is not beneficial to apply additional marijuana fertilizer to seedlings in rockwool or other inert media until the first set of true leaves appear, at which point a 1/4 to 1/2 strength application is made.

New and experienced cannabis growers mess up their marijuana seeds growth by not timing their marijuana feeding scheduling properly. Developing both a marijuana fertilizer formula and a feeding schedule is important to successfully grow marijuana.

Paying attention to seedlings will allow a grower to time their application of marijuana fertilizer just right.

Not only are chemical marijuana fertilizer pose a significant risk to seedlings, but also organic fertilizers too. Organic marijuana fertilizers do pose a risk. Too much organic marijuana food will burn a seedling just like chemical fertilizers.

One of the best advices to consider is less marijuana fertilizer is better. As you can always add more, but taking away is impossible. Once a marijuana plant is overfed you’ll have problems.

But a slightly under marijuana fertilized plant will be just fine. Just remember less marijuana fertilizer is best.

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