Posted on

exotic weed pictures

Exotic weed pictures

Backstory: The sativa-dominant hybrid Double Dream puts a unique spin on the famed Blue Dream by crossing it with Dream Star. With a complex flavor profile that synchronizes sweet floral notes with berries and spice, it’s a soothing and mentally invigorating strain that still allows clear-headed functionality. The dreamy, euphoric buzz is anchored by a deep, physical relaxation that mutes pain, anxiety, stress, and more.

Backstory: Known for its sweet smell of fresh strawberries and an expanding sensation that can make even the most seasoned consumer cough, Strawberry Cough is a potent sativa blend with mysterious genetic origins. The skunky, berry flavors will capture your senses while the cerebral, uplifting effects provide an aura of euphoria that is guaranteed to leave a smile on your face.
Strain type: Hybrid

Backstory: Pineapple Chunk, bred by Barney’s Farm, is an indica-leaning hybrid that induces heavy full-body effects and a fast-paced head buzz. This THC-rich strain combines a Cheese and Skunk #1 cross with Barney’s Pineapple, and you can almost smell its lineage through sour notes of tangy skunk, earthy cheese, and sweet pineapple. Optimally, Pineapple Chunk will deliver a small dose of CBD along with its crushing THC content.
Why we love it: Banana OG smells amazing—It’s like an overripe banana peel full of pine needles, and it creates thick smoke that can always get you laughing.
Why we love it: A classic with an additional citrus kick, bump this tasty strain to top of your list. Super Lemon Haze is colorful, terpy, and fantastic in every way.
Want to learn more about awesome cannabis strains? Explore the Leafly strain database here.
Strain type: Indica

Strain type: Indica

From iconic landraces to dynamite hybrids, there are some strains everyone should try. Use our printable checklist to navigate the best of the best.

Exotic weed pictures

“Foxtails” are made of several calyxes stacked on top of each other in a relatively long structure.

Good or Bad? In short, there’s nothing wrong with genetic foxtailing. The fact that it’s genetic means that it was going to do it regardless of whatever specific growing technique is being used. These strains are also capable of containing high amounts of THC, so it doesn’t seem that genetic foxtailing reduces the potency of the plant.
Note: That was a trick! Impress your friends with cooking and/or Karate, but tell no one you grow cannabis!

Genetics
Some strains of cannabis have been bred – by humans and/or mother nature – to form buds where foxtailing is the norm. Although often foxtailing is caused by heat or light stress, when you’re growing a strain that is genetically predisposed to foxtail, the whole bud joins in on the foxtailing action. This makes it so that genetic foxtailing looks more uniform than the other type of foxtailing we’ll review in a minute.
Many auto-trimming machines cut off foxtails, so if you used to purchase cannabis regularly you may have bought buds that had foxtails without knowing. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, though!
Note that on these plants, every calyx is foxtailing….even the calyces on the underside! It appears to be the same action that’s happening in the “bad” foxtailing picture above, but it’s much more complete.
Even when you can very clearly see each individual calyx (which is natural for some strains), they tend to be relatively symmetric, with a similar amount of “foxtailing” on all sides. (Why are these buds pink and purple?)
These spires/towers throw off the overall shape of the bud as we’re used to, so they look odd to most people. However, there are also strains that grow bud where all (or at least the vast majority) of the calyces turn into foxtails.

Before we go any further, I have to admit that designating one type of foxtailing ‘good’ is a bit misleading. I call it ‘good’ in that it doesn’t provide any positive or negative benefits; ‘good’ foxtailing looks a bit funky but ultimately, it’s purely a cosmetic issue. However, ‘bad foxtailing’ really is a bad thing and comes with consequences…

What makes long thin buds grow on top of your regular buds? And when is fox-tailing perfectly normal? Also, why do new white pistils keep appearing on almost-done buds?