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drooping cannabis leaves

Drooping cannabis leaves

  • Solo cup -> 1 gal -> 3 gal
  • Solo cup -> 1 gal -> 5 gal
  • Solo cup -> 2 gal -> 5 gal
  • Solo cup -> 1.5 gal -> 3 gal -> 5+ gal

Notice how the plants in smaller containers have grown more than the plant that was put in a big container as a seedling. It’s common for plants in too-big containers to grow a little slowly at first.
More information about container size and transplanting here: https://www.growweedeasy.com/germinate#what-size-pot

The plant was watered the right amount each time, but too often. As a result, it shows some slight drooping. While this won’t kill the plant, the plant will definitely grow faster when the mix is allowed to dry out a bit so the roots are getting plenty of oxygen.
This OG Tahoe Kush seedling was overpotted, though this can be overcome by the grower just giving a little bit of water at a time until the plant starts growing vigorously. At that point, the grower can provide more and more water until they’re finally watering normally.
A too small container, combined with overwatering – these conditions can cause some strange symptoms that often look like a nutrient deficiency
Despite what seems like an obvious cause, several different scenraios can end in overwatering. Here are some of the most common trouble-makers:
For new seedlings and clones, use a small container if possible

  • Always start with a good growing medium that drains well – never use a clay based soil which holds onto way too much water. A high quality potting mix (especially mixed with some perlite) provides great drainage
  • Start with a smaller container to reduce the chances of overwatering seedlings
  • Make sure there are plenty of drainage holes to let water out the bottom of the container
  • If water runs through growing medium slowly, you can mix perlite into the potting mix to increase oxygen and quicken drainage
  • Water less often and less at a time until plant is drinking more
  • Get a container that helps the growing medium dry out from the sides (such as “Smart Pots” – highly recommended; or air pots).
  • Don’t allow plants to sit in a tray that has been collecting runoff water

Is a plant drooping because it got too much water, or not enough? Overwatered cannabis plants often have firm leaves, while the leaves of under-watered plants tend to be more limp and lifeless. Both can result in yellow leaves and other odd leaf symptoms. Learn how often you should be watering your marijuana plants!

Drooping cannabis leaves

Over-watering can also cause the soil or grow medium to compress and suffocate the roots, which respire by breathing in oxygen (O2) during the dark or night cycle. The top third of the root structure contains air-specialized roots for this purpose (while the bottom third of the root structure is known as “water roots”). If the grow medium becomes too compacted, the breathable roots may lose their ability to respire and absorb oxygen, which they use to convert sugars to energy. Both the loss of oxygen and the build up of abscisic acid will severely weaken steams and leaves of the plant above the surface.

To fix the drooping, allow the medium to dry out overnight (completely) and use a thin stick (i.e., a skewer) to gently poke holes around the surface of the medium to help aerate—taking care not to damage any roots below. Poke around the edges, about an inch or two down, making a circling motion with the stick to make small holes.
When it comes to drooping leaves, the issue is most often due to over-watering, believe it or not. Sometimes water stress, such as “drowned roots,” can cause abscisic acid to build up, closing down the leaf stomata and creating problems in both respiration and photosynthesis.

It is important to understand that wilting/drooping leaves means that there is a deficiency somewhere within the plant. A deficiency can come from one or multiple areas (let’s hope it is just one). The primary areas a plant receives nutrition from are: light (photon energy), atmosphere (CO2 and O2) and medium (H2O and mineral nutrients).
An example of healthy plants, with leaves cupped upwards toward the light. (Photo by Nico Escondido)
A semi-wilted leaf that is dry and cracking. It also has a mineral deficiency, most likely potassium (K). (Photo by Nico Escondido)
Wilting/ drooping leaves are most commonly a sign of problems with water and/or nutrients. You did not mention any discoloration of the leaves, which is good, leaving us to focus mostly on hydration and not mineral deficiencies. But to start, we need to make a distinction between the terms wilting and drooping.
Wilting leaves, which is actually defined as having water loss or being dehydrated, is obviously associated with a lack of water. Wilting leaves will be dry to the touch and even a bit crumbly. Because you water twice daily and state the leaves are “heavy,” my guess here is the former—over-watering.

Generally, good watering practice dictates that you water each plant once, at the start of the day when the sun/ lights come up. Saturate the medium well, until you see the first drops seep out of the bottom of the container. That will be enough water for the day. It is also a good idea to let the medium become fairly dry—at least near the surface of the medium—before attempting to water the plant again. It is important to remember that while the plant itself breathes in CO2, the roots beneath the surface breath in oxygen (O2) during the night cycle. This is an essential part to healthy plant growth and development. And a dry, aerated medium goes a long way in allowing air to permeate the root zone and roots to breathe in their precious O2.

It is important to understand that wilting/drooping leaves means that there is a deficiency somewhere within the plant. A deficiency can come from one or multip