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does second hand weed smoke get in your system

The second experiment repeated the scenario, but this time in a room with ventilation . The non-smokers in this experiment later said they felt “hungry” — the study did also finish up around lunchtime — but none of them tested positive for any noticeable amount of THC .

While there’s an abundance of research demonstrating the adverse health effects of secondhand exposure to cigarette smoke, there is little evidence to suggest that secondhand marijuana smoke carries the same detrimental health risks as tobacco smoke. Considering that past research has found marijuana smoke to be less carcinogenic than cigarette smoke , there’s doesn’t seem to be an immediate public health concern regarding secondhand weed smoke. That being said, as long as you’re not stuck in a poorly ventilated room during a heavy smoke session, you shouldn’t be concerned about feeling stoned or having THC enter your system.
Can you get high from smelling weed in the air or walking through the remnants of secondhand weed smoke? No, it’s highly unlikely you’ll experience a secondhand high or have cannabis byproducts show up on a drug screening. As the 2015 Johns Hopkins University research study shows, in order to catch a secondhand high, you’d have to be under extreme conditions and lack proper ventilation.

Nonetheless, weed smokers should still be respectful of people who don’t consume cannabis. The next time you spark one up, try to be aware of your surroundings and make an attempt to keep the smoke and strong odor away from non-smokers. To enjoy a smooth smoking session without affecting your non-partaking neighbors, cannabis users should spark up in well-ventilated areas to ensure passive inhalers will not feel the effects of the smoke or test positive for weed.
Researchers started with a dozen people — six cannabis smokers and six non-smokers. In the first experiment, all 12 subjects spent an hour together in a small unventilated room, during which time each smoker went through 10 “high-potency” joints (with 11.3% THC content). Afterward, the non-smokers reported feeling “pleasant,” more tired, and less alert. And sure enough, their blood and urine tests came up positive for THC .
Studies performed during the mid- to late-1980s investigating the mystery of the secondhand high determined that the acute toxicity of cannabis was extremely low, therefore making it difficult to feel the effects without direct inhalation. While their conclusions may still apply, cannabis has changed over the years and the studies may need reexamination.
So, do you have to inhale weed to get high ? Or can you really get a secondhand high from being around other people smoking cannabis? Is it really a thing?
This could be concerning for those who fear that exposure to secondhand weed smoke could get them involuntarily stoned or cause them to fail a drug test . Therefore, it’s important to know whether second-hand cannabis smoke can get you high or enter your system.

You’ve probably heard the term “ secondhand high ” before. Also known as a contact high, the concept has become a popularized plot point in films and TV shows. You may have even been to a smoky concert hall yourself and walked away feeling a little lightheaded, even if you never took a single puff.

Ever wonder if you can get high from smelling weed? Learn if you can really get a secondhand high.

Does second hand weed smoke get in your system

Of even more concern was that whereas blood vessel function returned to normal after 40 minutes for rats exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke, this wasn’t the case for the marijuana smoke group; in the rats exposed to secondhand marijuana smoke, blood vessel function remained affected after this interval.

As more states legalize marijuana, issues regarding secondhand exposure are likely to be examined in more depth.
Many people have questioned whether secondhand marijuana smoke in non-smokers can result in positive drug screens.

Of course, the next step is determining the significance of reduced blood vessel function, something which has been linked to atherosclerosis and heart attacks.
In a study of 43 children, age 1 month to 2 years, who were admitted to hospitals in Colorado from 2013 to 2015 for bronchiolitis, urine samples tested for marijuana metabolites revealed that 16% of the children had a detectable level of exposure to secondhand marijuana smoke.   Another study that provided a preliminary look at health outcomes of children living in homes where marijuana is used showed a “relatively strong. association. between indoor cannabis smoking and adverse health outcomes in children” indicating a significant need for further study.  
Sanja Jelic, MD, is board-certified in sleep medicine, critical care medicine, pulmonary disease, and internal medicine.
Though older studies seemed to say no, a 2015 study suggests that the answer is yes, in rare cases anyway.   That said, the yes deserves an explanation. It’s wasn’t easy for a non-user to have a positive test. In the study that said “yes,” non-users were subjected to what was called “extreme exposure”—heavy exposure in poorly ventilated rooms—something that an individual would clearly be aware of. Even in this type of situation, the chance of a “false positive” result rapidly decreased with time; drug screens would be normal in a matter of minutes or hours.  
For Users: Remember that legal doesn’t mean harmless. Consider the risk of secondhand smoke to non-smokers nearby, as well as the risk to children. Driving while under the influence of marijuana has the potential to result in injuries to both self, and other passengers in the car, as marijuana users are roughly 25 percent more likely to crash.   And, keep in mind that long-term use of marijuana can result in addiction in some people.

In one study, levels of ammonia were 20 times higher in secondhand marijuana smoke than secondhand tobacco smoke. Levels of hydrogen cyanide and aromatic amines were three times to five times higher in secondhand marijuana smoke than secondhand tobacco smoke. And like tobacco smoke, marijuana contains a number of carcinogens (compounds known to cause cancer) such as benzene, cadmium, nickel, and more.  

How does secondhand marijuana smoke exposure affect the health of nearby non-pot smokers, and what impact does this have on drug testing?