Dill Weed Seeds

Buy the finest and freshest Dill seeds for sale online at Bulk Seed Store. All Dill seeds are available in bulk varieties. Dill is a popular herb in the kitchen, flavoring everything from pickles to fish. The best way to make sure you have the very freshest dill possible is by growing dill in your own garden. Learn how to grow it here. Dill can be easily growin in containers, both indoors and outdoors. Choose a deep container to accommodate the tall plant and its long roots.

Bulk Dill Seeds

Most commonly used for soups, stews, and pickling, dill – often referred to as dill weed – is an aromatic biennial herb, yet is cultivated as an annual due to its ease of growth. Dill grows best under full sunlight in rich and moist, yet well-drained soil; however its flavor can actually be enhanced when stressed from heat and drought. Dill is a self-seeding plant, which makes it super easy to grow – just like a weed, hence its nickname “dill weed” – however, this also means it can invade other beds, so be sure to plant dill seeds near onions and cabbage, and far away from carrots. You can begin harvesting your dill as soon as the plant grows 4 to 5 leaves.

Bulk Dill Seeds – Bouquet (Common) Quick View

Bulk Dill Seeds – Bouquet (Common) Anethum graveolens

  • Annual; Grows up to 30 Inches
  • Popular uses include: Culinary
  • Commonly used in pickling

Bulk Dill Seeds – Dukat Quick View

Bulk Dill Seeds – Dukat Anethum graveolens

  • Annual; Grows up to 30 Inches
  • Popular uses include: Culinary
  • This vigorous variety tends to product more foliage than other types of dill

Bulk Dill Seeds – Long Island Mammoth Quick View

Bulk Dill Seeds – Long Island Mammoth Anethum graveolens

  • Annual; Grows up to 48 Inches
  • Popular uses include: Culinary
  • Excellent flavor

USDA organic Bulk Dill Seeds (Organic) – Bouquet Quick View

Bulk Dill Seeds (Organic) – Bouquet Anethum graveolens

  • Annual; Grows up to 48 Inches
  • Popular uses include: Culinary
  • Commonly used in pickling

Dill is a great companion planting, so why not stock up on bulk dill seeds from the Bulk Seed Store for your next round of plantings? We carry 3 varieties of bulk dill seeds which are available in sacks as large as 25-pounds, and as small as just 1/4-pound to get you started!

See also  Sativa Weed Seeds

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Tips On How To Grow Dill Weed Plants

Dill is a popular herb in the kitchen, flavoring everything from pickles to fish. Gourmets know that you can’t beat fresh dill for the flavor. The best way to have the very freshest dill possible is by growing dill in your own garden. Let’s look at how to grow dill.

Planting Dill Seed

The best way how to grow dill is directly from seeds rather than from a transplant. Planting dill seed is easy. Dill planting is simply done by scattering the seeds in the desired location after the last frost, then lightly cover the seeds with soil. Water the area thoroughly.

Care of Dill Weed Plants

Growing dill plants and caring for dill plants is also very easy. Dill weed plants grow best in full sun. Other than this, dill will grow happily in both poor and rich soil or in damp or dry conditions.

Harvesting Dill Weed Plants

One of the benefits of growing dill is that both the leaves and seeds of dill weed plants are edible.

See also  Germinating Weed Seeds In Distilled Water

To harvest the dill leaves, regularly trim off the desired amount of leaves you need for cooking. If you wish to harvest dill seeds, allow the plant to grow without trimming until it goes into bloom. Once dill weed plants go into bloom, they’ll stop growing leaves, so make sure that you don’t harvest any leaves from that plant. The dill flower will fade and will develop the seed pods. When the seed pods have turned brown, cut the whole flower head off and place in a paper bag. Gently shake the bag. The seeds will fall out of the flower head and seed pods and you’ll be able to separate the seeds from the waste.

There are many recipes that use dill. Planting this herb in your garden will keep plenty of fresh dill on hand for all of these recipes. Now that you know how to grow dill, you have no reason not to be planting dill seed out this year.

Dill Weed Seeds

By: Joseph Masabni and Stephen King

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is a perennial herb that typically reaches 2 to 4 feet tall at maturity. Its leaves are used fresh or dried as an herb in dips, soups, salads, and other dishes. The seeds are used as a spice for pickling and for adding flavor to stews and roasts. Dill is native to southern Russia, western Africa, and the Mediterranean. It is part of the Umbelliferae family, which also includes cumin and parsley.

Figure 1. Dill seeds are used as a spice for pickling and for adding flavor to stews and roasts.

Varieties

These varieties are best for Texas:

  • Bouquet
  • Dukat
  • Fernleaf
  • Long Island
  • Superdukat

Figure 2. Dill plants can survive low temperatures but grow best when soil temperature is about 70°F.

Site selection

Plant dill in full sun and protect it from strong gusts of wind. The plant can survive temperatures down to 25°F.

Soil preparation

Dill can grow fairly well in poor soil conditions. But it grows best in well drained, sandy or loamy soil that is slightly acidic (pH 5.8 to 6.5). The soil temperature should remain at about 70°F.

See also  Planting Weed Seeds Straight Into Soil

Planting

Sow the seeds directly in the ground from April through May, after all danger of frost has passed. Do not transplant them.

They should germinate in 10 to 14 days. Seedlings should be planted ¾ to 1 inch deep and from 12 to 15 inches apart.

Growing dill in containers

Dill can also be easily grown in containers, both indoors and outdoors. Choose a deep container to accommodate the tall plant and its long roots. Use normal potting compost and keep the plants well watered.

If the container is inside, place the plants where they will receive at least 5 to 6 hours of direct sunlight each day. You may need to support the plants with a stake. The dill will be ready for harvest within about 8 weeks after the seeds were sown.

Figure 3. Dill containers need enough space for the plant’s tall growth and long roots.

Fertilizing

Fertilizer may be broadcast (spread on the surface throughout the planting) or applied as a side dressing (applied to the soil on or around the sides of the plant). Do not apply it directly with the seed.

In general, apply a formulation such as 20-20-20 once in late spring at the rate of 0.70 pound of fertilizer per 100 square feet. “Triple 20” fertilizer is commonly used by gardeners because it is readily available at garden centers.

A better formulation that doesn’t apply too much phosphorus is 15-5-10, and it is also available at garden centers. When using 15-5-10, apply 1 pound per 100 square feet.

Figure 4. Dill has the most flavor when it is picked before flowering begins.

Harvesting

Dill grown outside matures about 90 days after seeding. Although the leaves can be harvested as soon as they are big enough to use, they contain the most flavors if picked before flowering begins. Clip them close to the stem in the early morning or late evening.

Once the flowers form, they will bloom and seed. Cut the seed heads 2 to 3 weeks after bloom. Place the cuttings in paper or plastic bags, and allow them to dry; the seeds will fall off when they are ready.