Posted on

congo strain

Congo strain

This boutique producer in Green Buff grows its plants under lights in a climate-controlled environment. Through an integrated pest management program they produce all of their high-quality cannabis pesticide-free.

Wed., Oct. 23, 2019
Though not a true landrace, this strain is derived from an indigenous cultivar from the Congo region of Central Africa. Based on my research, the seeds from these tall wispy, narrow-leafed plants were brought west and crossed with a top-quality Mexican and landrace Afghani plants.

The seeds of tall wispy, narrow-leafed plants from the Congo region were crossed with a top-quality Mexican and landrace Afghani plants. (Courtesy Green Bluff Greenhouse)
Though having never experienced authentic Red Congolese I do have a history with the Mexican and Afghani contributions to its genetics and can honestly say they come through nicely in Green Bluff Greenhouse’s version.
But one I’ve found in this area really reminds me of these original strains: Red Congolese from Green Bluff Greenhouse.
These days, it has become the mission of dedicated cannabis breeders, plus a few greedy entrepreneurs, to scour the globe, especially more isolated regions, to collect seeds from the true remaining ‘landrace’ strains.
Aroma: A bright citrus backed up by a pungent Mexican Marigold scent hits your senses immediately. After this initial blast a deep earthiness lingers, which seems to come from its Afghan genetics. There are nice familiar scents that I associate with the more basic cultivars of old, but the cultivation techniques of Green Bluff Greenhouse and the improved genetics have taken those aromas and enhanced them. Lighting up brings on a burning smell from the past but without the acrid, old roach character of its poorly cured predecessors.

This practice has brought us more choices, but has also diluted the pure plant gene pool. Some Western seed collectors are convincing local growers to cross their cultivars with other, higher-THC types from outside their area for stronger, more marketable product.

The seeds from these tall wispy, narrow-leafed plants were brought from the Congo region and crossed with a top-quality Mexican and landrace Afghani plants.