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cloning spider plants

Cloning spider plants

Spider plant is also known as ribbon plant or airplane plant.

Water the potting mixture thoroughly, then set the pot side to drain until the potting mixture is evenly moist but not waterlogged.
Plant the base of the offset in the moist potting mixture. Place the pot in bright, indirect light, but avoid intense bright light which could burn the offset. Normal daytime room temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit are fine, with nighttime temperatures about 10 degrees cooler.

Water as needed to keep the potting mixture evenly moist until new growth appears, which indicates the offset has rooted. At that point, allow the potting mixture to dry slightly between waterings. Water deeply when the top of the soil feels dry, then let the pot drain thoroughly.
A trouble-free plant valued for its easy growth habit, spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) is at home in containers or hanging baskets where the grass-like leaves arch gracefully over the sides. A frost-tender tropical plant, spider plant is usually grown indoors; however, it grows outdoors in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 through 11. Clone a spider plant any time of year by planting the miniature offsets, or plantlets, directly in potting mixture.
Cut an offset from the parent plant by cutting the runner near the base of the miniature plant. Use a sharp knife or clean scissors to cut the runner. Select a miniature plant offset that has several roots.
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Fill a planting container with regular commercial potting soil. Use a pot with a drainage hole in the bottom, as poorly drained soil often causes diseases such as stem and root rot.

Feed the newly rooted spider plant once a month during spring and summer. Use a water-soluble fertilizer for indoor plants, applied at a rate of 1/2 teaspoon of fertilizer in 1 gallon of water.

A trouble-free plant valued for its easy growth habit, spider plant (Chlorophytum comosum) is at home in containers or hanging baskets where the grass-like leaves arch gracefully over the sides. A frost-tender tropical plant, spider plant is usually grown indoors; however, it grows outdoors in U.S. Department of …

Cloning spider plants

Who doesn’t love a spider plant? These charming little plants are easy to grow and produce “spiderettes” off the ends of their stems. These babies can be divided from the parent plant and grown as separate plants. Can you grow spider plants in water? Plants need certain nutrients to grow and thrive, and can’t be sustained in water long term unless you are using a hydroponic solution. However, you can root the little plantlets and transfer them to soil once the root system is vigorous.

Use demineralized water or let your tap water sit for a day before placing the plantlet in the liquid. Fill a jar or glass with this non-chlorinated water and set the cutting into the container with the bulk of its leaves outside the liquid. Place the cutting in indirect light until it has developed roots. This is a fairly quick process. Frequent water changes are essential to good spider plant water cultivation.
Feed the cutting every month, but be careful to change the water every week to prevent salt build up. Leaving rooted spider plants in water can be capricious. Without support, the leaves may be submerged in the water, which can rot them. Additionally, the stems will be limp and may not produce more growth. A better option than growing a spider plant in water is to transplant the plantlet into a growing medium of soil. Leaving rooted spider plants in water limits their growth potential.

Change the water frequently and avoid tap water. Rainwater is a good option to protect sensitive roots from overly acidic or mineralized solutions. Remove the rooted plants and place a thick layer of washed pebbles at the bottom of your container. This will give the roots something to hang onto after you reintroduce the plant to the glass.
Plain old water is unlikely to sustain the cutting for very long. Key nutrients can be derived from fertilizer; however, a risk of root burn from built up salts is a potential result. Growing a spider plant in water is a first step to starting a new plant but not a sustainable system.
If you are bound and determined to keep your plants suspended in water, use a pair of chopsticks or skewers to help keep the foliage from dangling in the liquid. The only part you want in the water is the root system.
Many houseplants are easy to grow in water for a period of time, such as Pothos and spider plants, Taking cuttings or offsets is an easy way to propagate a favorite plant. These cuttings root quickly in just a glass of water. Once rooting is established, the new plant needs nutrients for future development.
No fertilizer will be necessary as the little plant develops roots. However, once a good network of roots have formed, the plant will have needs. You may choose to use a liquid fertilizer such as fish food or diluted houseplant food.

Spider plants produce little tufted growths at the end of their stems. These can be taken off the main plant and allowed to grow roots as separate plants. The best way to propagate the plant is to cut the plantlet from the stolon with clean, sharp scissors.

Can you grow spider plants in water? Plants need certain nutrients to grow and thrive and can't be sustained in water long term unless you are using a hydroponic solution. However, you can root the little plantlets and transfer them to soil. Learn more here.