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cannabis curling leaves

Cannabis curling leaves

Indoor growers must constantly maintain the optimal environmental conditions. This starts with optimal light distance. The only way to keep the plant canopy in the sweet spot is to measure and adjust until mature plants peak in height during mid-late bloom, depending on the strain. Moreover, indoor growers can utilise air-con and fans to keep the grow-op cool.

There are numerous reasons why you might find curly cannabis leaves in your grow-op. This guide will explain why this phenomenon occurs, and what you can do to prevent it from ruining your final product.
Cannabis plants can’t vocalise a call for help—but they can send signals to tell you all is not well. If you see leaves either clawing or curling, there is trouble with the trees. Don’t ignore their pleas. This blog will help you identify the causes and cures for curly cannabis leaves.

Cold temperatures can cause curly cannabis leaves too. Eventually, all kinds of leaf discolouration will develop. Sure, cooler nighttime temps late in bloom can add a dash of purple charm to buds, but prolonged exposure to temperatures below 10°C will kill your plants. Flowers will be loose and leafy if plants even make it to harvest. Coupled with high RH, buds will be moist and become vulnerable to Botrytis, AKA bud rot.
Indoors, if temps are too low, you can always add more grow lights and turn a negative into a positive. Outdoor growers might consider an early harvest, or if possible, moving plants indoors at night. Cannabis is a hardy plant species, but outside of the optimal 20–28°C temperature range, leaves will curl or claw.
Genetics are the cause of all kinds of cannabis leaf deformities and mutations. Some strains occasionally have a tendency towards curly leaves or other odd traits. Most growers will thin out these plants. All the shrewd cultivator can do is write it off as bad luck.
“Water mould” microorganisms are just like vampires; you have to invite them in before they can do any harm. Keep them out of the garden by making sure they are not welcome. Maintaining an effective wet-dry cycle is all it takes. If you can pick up your pots, do it. Then you can tell by their weight when it’s time to water.
If you can’t lift the containers, then consider a moisture meter and make sure to carefully monitor post-watering plant behaviour. Try reducing the volume of water. Alternatively, take longer intervals between waterings. Unfortunately, Pythium is virtually incurable and will turn your plant’s roots into brown sludge. If you see droopy, curly cannabis leaves, especially with young plants, look to the roots for answers.

It’s better to start low and go slow. You can incrementally increase doses without seeing leaves curling or clawing. But if you dive right in at maximum strength, you can expect plenty of curly cannabis leaves that will probably die and eventually drop-off.
It should go without saying, but we’ll say it again for good measure; make sure the nutrient solution is the right pH. That’s about 6.0pH for soil and a more precise 5.8pH for coco/hydroponics.

Cannabis leaves curling or clawing are signs your plants are suffering. Something is going wrong in the garden. This blog will help you save the stash.