Posted on

cannabis clawing

Cannabis clawing

Solution: Reduce the Nitrogen your plant is getting!

However, this time we’re the dealing with the opposite problem: nitrogen toxicity, or too much nitrogen.
The reason nitrogen is in all plant nutrient formulations is because it’s vital to plant processes.

In fact, nitrogen is one of the 3 nutrients that are included in almost every kind of plant food.

  • Marijuana plants that get too much Nitrogen in the vegetative stage don’t grow as vigorously.
  • Too much nitrogen is especially harmful in the flowering stage, because this will cause your plant to produce much smaller buds.
  • If you react quickly and reduce your nitrogen levels at the first sign of toxicity, your plant will quickly recover.

The Claw in the Flowering Stage
Signs of Nitrogen Toxicity
Your plant needs a lot of nitrogen in the vegetative stage, and it’s generally hard to give too much as long as you’re not going completely overboard with nutrients. Nitrogen is a big part of what makes leaves green, and is incredibly important to the process of photosynthesis (making energy from light).

When looking at plant nutrients, you’ll almost always see 3 numbers listed, like 3-12-6 or 5-10-5. These numbers represent the ratio of Nitrogen (N), Phosphorous (P) and Potassium (K) contained in the bottle. Just about all plant life on Earth needs these 3 elements to grow.

Does your plant have "the claw?" The talon-like leaves that are bent at the ends are a sign that your plant may have nitrogen toxicity. Learn how to fix it.

Cannabis clawing

A Nitrogen toxicity is the result of the plant getting too much Nitrogen (usually from too high levels of nutrients overall, or by using a Vegetative nutrient in the flowering stage). It causes dark green leaves and curled tips (“the claw”).

A plant with a Nitrogen toxicity tends to be dark green all over
Overwatering makes leaves fat with water, and they tend to curl down and droop

Heat can cause leaves to curl up
This plant’s roots were damaged from being overwatered and too hot for several days. As a result, the leaves took on a strange, blistery appearance.
Example of too much wind on your leaves
Rootbound plants often droop, appear yellow, get nutrient deficiencies, and stay small. Even if you’re caring for them perfectly!
Often a bug infestation caused general plant unhappiness, but these are some of the most likely to cause curling or clawing leaves.

You can help prevent over and under-watering your cannabis plants by always starting with good soil or coco coir.

Learn about the various things that cause cannabis leaf curling or clawing, and get the solutions!