Can You Take CBD Oil With Aspirin

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Does CBD interact with Aspirin?, CBDGroup.cz When you take CBD alongside certain medications, it can trigger negative drug interactions. Here we explain what drugs shouldn’t be taken with CBD — and when to consult your doctor if you’re not sure about the potential interactions. CBD interaction with Aspirin: Does taking them together negatively affect health? Find out more about how the drugs interact and the effects of their combination below.

Does CBD interact with Aspirin?

Information about the risks and possible interactions between CBD and aspirin.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid derived from the Cannabis sativa plant that is commonly used to manage chronic pain and inflammation.

Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is another common painkiller that can be bought over the counter at pharmacies.

Despite similar effects, the level of risk of interaction between the two substances is minimal.

Does CBD interact with Aspirin?

CBD is unlikely to interact with low doses of Aspirin.

However, at higher doses or with long-term use, CBD could theoretically increase serum levels of Aspirin over time – leading to potential side effects.

Both CBD and Aspirin are considered blood thinners and analgesics. It is possible that this combination could lead to an increase in side effects associated with these effects – including bruising, blood loss or liver damage.

In practice, however, none of these side effects have been reported, and people who take both dietary supplements daily rarely, if ever, experience any significant side effects.

Is it safe to take CBD and Aspirin together?

In most cases, it is safe to take CBD together with low doses of Aspirin. If you have been prescribed a high-potency Aspirin or are taking Aspirin daily to manage your risk of heart disease, it is a good idea to check with your doctor before starting CBD.

Although CBD is unlikely to interact directly with Aspirin, it may be contraindicated in some types of heart disease.

Is CBD a suitable alternative to aspirin?

CBD is widely used for several benefits, the main ones being pain relief and anxiety management.

For mild to moderate pain and inflammation, CBD may be a viable and potentially even more effective option than Aspirin.

For use as a blood thinner, CBD is not comparable to Aspirin and is not considered a viable alternative.

What is Aspirin?

Aspirin and its generic ingredient acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). It is a drug commonly used to treat pain, inflammation and fever. It is classified as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug – NSAID for short.

It is widely prescribed to patients with heart disorders such as heart attack, heart failure or cardiac arrest as a blood thinner to prevent possible blood clots and subsequent heart damage.

Aspirin is readily available in pharmacies and no prescription is needed to purchase it from these pharmacies. The drug is manufactured by different pharmaceutical companies and is therefore available under different brand names such as Bayer, Easprin, Ecotrin and Ecoprin.

Aspirin has a half-life of either 2 hours to 3 hours or 15 hours to 30 hours depending on the dose, with the former being the half-life of 100 mg or less of Aspirin. The drug is excreted predominantly in the urine, almost 80%, with the remainder excreted in faeces and sweat.

Aspirin (Acetylsalicylic acid)

Aspirin, Aspro Clear, Bayer, Disprin, Easprin, Ecotrin, Ecoprin, Entercote

Classification

Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID)

CYP Metabolism

Liver (CYP2C19 and CYP3A)

Interaction with CBD

Agonistic (Increased effects)

Risk of Interaction

What does Aspirin do?

Aspirin is used to treat a range of medical conditions that present with symptoms such as fever, pain and inflammation. It is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in cardiology clinics because its ability to thin the blood is crucial for patients who have recently had a heart attack or stroke.

Aspirin’s mechanism of action involves the irreversible inhibition of the enzyme cyclooxygenase, or COX, which is key to the synthesis and distribution of prostaglandins and thromboxane in the body.

There are two different types of cyclooxygenases in the human body, namely COX1 and COX2 enzymes, the former being responsible for the production of thromboxane, a hormone responsible for vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation in blood vessels.

COX1 is irreversibly inhibited by Aspirin, while the activity of COX2, the enzyme responsible for the production of prostaglandin hormone, which induces the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, is modified by the drug.

The modification of COX2 activity leads to the conversion of the enzyme’s ability to produce prostaglandins into the production of the enzyme lipoxygenase, which helps with the metabolism of various polyunsaturated fats in the human body.

Aspirin’s inhibitory effect on the COX1 enzyme helps the drug to manage bleeding because the irreversible inhibition of thromboxane A2 in platelets inhibits platelet aggregation for 7 to 8 days, which is the lifespan of an affected platelet. This mechanism is responsible for prescribing Aspirin to patients with a history of heart attack, stroke, transient ischemic attack, and unstable angina to help prevent recurrence of these medical emergencies.

Prostaglandins play a large role in transmitting information from the brain to various parts of the body suffering from pain and inflammation. They are also known to have an effect on the regulation of the hypothalamic heat centre and therefore alter body temperature and disrupt the body’s thermal homeostasis.

Inhibition of these prostaglandins by inhibiting an enzyme required for their synthesis is essential for pain and inflammation management in the body. Aspirin can manage and treat fever-like symptoms by inhibiting these hormones and inducing proper body temperature regulation.

The irreversible inhibition of local hormones in the body and possibly platelet aggregation is what sets Aspirin apart from other NSAIDs such as Ibuprofen and Diclofenac, as these are reversible inhibitors.

Side effects of Aspirin

Aspirin is a widely available, over-the-counter medication that is taken by almost all age groups. However, it is essential to keep in mind the fact that there are several side effects of this medication that need to be taken into account.

The use of Aspirin is contraindicated in pregnancy, especially after the 20th week of pregnancy, as it can lead to kidney disorders in the fetus due to decreased amniotic fluid levels.

In addition, its use is not recommended in children with flu or colds as it can lead to the development of a near fatal, progressive brain disease known as Reye’s syndrome. The use of this product is contraindicated in patients treated with warfarin or in patients with disorders affecting the lining of the stomach, such as peptic ulcers and gastritis. The preparation must not be taken with alcohol.

Common side effects of Aspirin include:

  • Skin rash.
  • Stomach and intestinal ulcers
  • Abdominal pain
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Heartburn
  • Tinnitus
  • Sleepiness
  • Headache

Aspirin should not be taken with a history of gastrointestinal disorders, without the advice of a healthcare professional.

More serious side effects of Aspirin include:

  • Retinal vein occlusion
  • Cerebral microhemorrhage
  • Reye’s syndrome
  • Bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract

Types of drug interactions with CBD

Cannabidiol, or CBD, has several benefits that can be attributed to its growing popularity, however, it can cause serious complications when it interacts with other drugs.

CBD can interact with other medications and cause either increased or decreased effects of the main drug.

These interactions can be of either low, moderate or severe clinical significance, with low interactions requiring no form of caution, moderate interactions to be avoided unless medically necessary and severe interactions to be avoided at all costs.

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Based on the effect of CBD on the parent drug, CBD-drug interactions can be divided into three types:

1. Agonist interactions

CBD enhances the effect of the drug by exerting the same effects. This is common with drugs that have similar analgesic, sedative, anxiolytic, or anti-inflammatory effects.

2. Antagonistic interaction

CBD reduces the effect of the drug by either removing the drug from the system more quickly or inhibiting its effects. This is common with drugs with effects that are opposite to those of CBD – for example, stimulants, emetics or low blood pressure medications.

3. Metabolic competition

CBD blocks or competes with drug metabolism in the liver. This can cause an increase in the concentration of both substances in the bloodstream, which can lead to side effects.

This interaction is most concerning for drugs taken daily as it can cause levels to rise to dangerous levels over time.

Key Finding: Can CBD and Aspirin be taken together?

CBD and Aspirin have similar effects for managing pain and inflammation. There is some slight risk of interaction between these substances, but only when taken in high doses or over long periods of time.

Most people find greater pain relief when taking both Aspirin and CBD together.

References:

Atalay, S., Jarocka-Karpowicz, I., & Skrzydlewska, E. (2020). Antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of cannabidiol. Antioxidants, 9(1), 21.

Pellati, F., Borgonetti, V., Brighenti, V., Biagi, M., Benvenuti, S., & Corsi, L. (2018). Cannabis sativa L. and nonpsychoactive cannabinoids: their chemistry and role against oxidative stress, inflammation, and cancer. BioMed research international, 2018.

Sofia, R. D., Vassar, H. B., & Knobloch, L. C. (1975). Comparative analgesic activity of various naturally occurring cannabinoids in mice and rats. Psychopharmacology, 40(4), 285-295.

CBD Drug Interactions – Mixing Cannabidiol and Medications

Are you worried about potential CBD-drug interactions? In this article, we explain the mechanism behind drug metabolism and how CBD may interfere with it.

The range of therapeutic properties offered by CBD (cannabidiol) has spurred its popularity in recent years. This natural compound is known to relieve a host of symptoms, allowing for safer and more effective management of different health conditions.

And unlike THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD is non-intoxicating, so it won’t get you high.

CBD can assist in the treatment of anxiety disorders and depression, inflammation and pain, neurodegeneration, seizure disorders, sleep deprivation, metabolic conditions, neuropathy, migraines, inflammatory bowel disease, and more.

Considering CBD has so many potential health benefits, you may start wondering if it can interact with certain medications used to address the same symptoms — and whether you should or shouldn’t take these drugs with CBD.

Below you’ll find the dos and don’ts of using CBD along with medications.

Let’s start with the don’ts.

What Drugs Should Not Be Taken with CBD

Studies from the Indiana University Department of Medicine have provided a list of pharmaceutical drugs and medications which shouldn’t be taken with CBD.

The list below covers all groups of drugs that can negatively interact with CBD oil.

  • Angiotension II Blockers
  • Antiarrhythmics
  • Antibiotics
  • Antidepressants
  • Anticonvulsants / Anti-Seizure Medications
  • Antihistamines
  • Antipsychotics
  • Anesthetics
  • Beta-Blockers
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Calcium Channel Blockers
  • HIV Antivirals
  • HMG CoA Reductase Inhibitors (Statins)
  • Immune Modulators
  • Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
  • Oral Hypoglycemic Agents
  • Proton-Pump Inhibitors (PPIs)
  • Prokinetics
  • Steroids and Corticosteroids
  • Sulfonylureas

There’s also a group of drugs called “prodrugs” that first need to be processed into their therapeutic compounds instead of being therapeutic compounds on their own. In plain English, the inactive compound is consumed, and once in the body, it turns into the active compound.

If this mechanism is dependant on the CYP450 system (more on that later), a drug interaction can lead to insufficient concentrations of the therapeutic agent in the bloodstream — reducing its potency.

CBD Interaction with Drugs & Medications

This section covers the most common interactions between CBD and medications. If you take any of the substances listed below, make sure to consult your doctor before buying CBD oil.

CBD and Ibuprofen Interaction

Ibuprofen is one of the Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), meaning it can produce similar benefits to CBD in terms of inflammation and pain relief. Previously we’ve mentioned that NSAIDs interact with CBD, which may raise concerns about potential negative interactions between CBD oil and Ibuprofen.

According to a study from the Journal of Neurology Research, there have been no reported interactions between CBD and ibuprofen, although it doesn’t mean they do not exist. Health experts suggest that potential interactions may be dosage-dependent. If a certain dosage threshold is breached, CBD and NSAIDs like Ibuprofen can lead to unforeseen and potentially severe nervous system pathology.

CBD and Adderall Interaction

A 2020 study found that higher doses of medical cannabis led to a decreased use of ADHD medication in adults. Products containing a higher concentration of CBD were linked to lower ADHD scores. This means that CBD can interact with ADHD meds, decreasing their efficacy while providing more pronounced benefits. The potential side effects of interactions between CBD and Adderall may lead to decreased appetite.

CBD and Lamictal Interaction

Using medical cannabis and Lamictal may increase side effects such as dizziness, confusion, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Elderly consumers may also experience impairment in judgment. That being said, none of these side effects were proven to result from CBD use per se. When it comes to interactions between CBD and Lamictal, it can make the medication more or less effective, depending on the dosage.

CBD Oil and Antibiotics

There is no known interaction between CBD and antibiotics, although these interactions may occur if an antibiotic is metabolized through the cytochrome P450 enzyme system. Some studies indicate that taking CBD and antibiotics together may amplify the effects of one another without any negative side effects. However, more research is needed to confirm these findings on a larger scale.

CBD Oil and Omeprazole

CBD can inhibit the enzymes that are targeted by omeprazole and other Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs). Taking CBD with certain heartburn medications can increase the risk of diarrhea.

CBD and Thyroid Medications

Some people report mild nausea when taking CBD oil together with their thyroid medications. Since both substances are processed by the CYP450 enzyme system, taking CBD with a thyroid medication may cause hyperthyroidism because more thyroxine would be secreted than the body could metabolize.

CBD and Lisinopril

CBD can temporarily lower blood pressure, so taking it alongside medications like Lisinopril might reduce it even more, making you feel lethargic and weak. Always consult your doctor before adding CBD to your routine if you use anti-hypertension meds.

CBD and Prednisone

Since both CBD and corticosteroids are potent inhibitors of the CYP450 enzyme system, concomitant use may increase the risk of systemic side effects from corticosteroid use due to decreased glucocorticoid clearance. Corticosteroids like prednisolone and hydrocortisone should never be taken with CBD.

How Drugs Interact: Understanding Drug Metabolism

Metabolism can refer to how your body uses energy for weight management, or the way drugs are metabolized in your body.

The former is known as the basal metabolic rate, or in simple terms, the number of calories a person needs to maintain healthy body functions while at rest.

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The latter is very different from the basal metabolic rate. Drug metabolism refers to how a substance is processed and used by the body — with the majority of this processing happening in the liver.

Scientists call it the ‘first-pass effect’ or ‘first-pass metabolism.’

Using straightforward terms, when you take a medication, it is broken down in the liver into its active compounds so that the body can use them. Just like carbohydrates are broken down into sugars, fats into triglycerides, and proteins into amino acids — drugs break down into their individual ingredients.

From there, they are controlled by specific enzymes, which transform these compounds into metabolites. These metabolites then influence different processes in your body and are flushed with urine once used up.

How Is CBD Metabolized?

Drug metabolism determines the rate at which the body processes medications and other therapeutic compounds into their individual metabolites and how long they can stay in your system.

When you take CBD in the form of an oil, capsule, or gummy, it has to pass through your gut, where it is released into the bloodstream. From then, they travel through the bloodstream to the liver, where it absorbs through the hepatic portal. The liver breaks CBD down into its metabolites using enzymes, after which it can circulate throughout the body in the bloodstream again.

What Is the Cytochrome P450 System?

Aside from breaking compounds down into metabolites, the liver also detoxifies and excretes foreign substances and other types of toxic compounds. This can happen through a system of enzymes referred to as the Cytochrome P450 (CYP450). These enzymes contain heme as a cofactor to convert cannabinoids into more water-soluble molecules, increasing their absorption and efficacy.

Researchers estimate that the CYP450 system is responsible for metabolizing 60% of any drugs out there. And interestingly, doctors and pharmacists use this system to understand, evaluate, and predict the benefits of the drug and potential side effects based on their dosages.

However, certain compounds have the ability to compromise the CYP system’s functioning, negatively affecting the metabolism of certain medications. Once these interactions occur, the drugs can be metabolized faster or slower than normal.

CBD And the Cytochrome P450 System

As mentioned earlier, CBD can interact directly with the CYP450 system in the liver. According to preclinical studies, CBD binds to the site where the enzyme activity occurs, competing with other compounds and thus preventing this system from breaking down other substances.

This inhibitory effect on the CYP450 enzymes mainly depends on how much CBD a person takes, their unique physiology, and the type of CBD used (e.g., full-spectrum CBD vs. CBD isolate). The dosage determines the strength used by the CBD to bind to the active site of the metabolic enzymes. The tighter the bond, the more competitive inhibition.

Contraindications for Taking CBD with Medications

The mechanism behind CBD’s health benefits proves that it’s not a biologically inert compound. Instead, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of CBD are complex and similar to any other medication. Therefore, it has the potential to compromise the metabolism of certain medications.

Any therapeutic substance that relies on the CYP450 system can be potentially affected by CBD. A common indicator for such interaction is when your medication has a grapefruit warning on the bottle. However, this is by no means a solid point of reference, and you should always check with your doctor and pharmacist before taking the two compounds together.

Why You Should Always Consult Your Doctor First

The list of drugs that we’ve mentioned above is by no means definite and doesn’t include all the pharmaceutical substances that may interact with CBD. Similarly, not all the medication from these categories will necessarily cause an interaction — as is the case for antibiotics and Ibuprofen.

A consultation with a doctor experienced in CBD and cannabis use can help you establish the right routine for your medications and supplements to avoid potentially negative interactions. Some compounds work synergistically with CBD, so asking your doctor can help you maximize the effect of your treatment.

Not to mention that the doctor can guide you on finding the optimal dosage for yourself.

Key Takeaways on CBD Drug Interactions

The safety profile of CBD has been acknowledged by major health agencies, such as the World Health Organization (WHO), showing that it’s well-tolerated by animals and humans and rarely produces any dangerous side effects.

CBD also has a profound impact on an array of systems, which explains its therapeutic versatility. That being said, this versatility is also the reason why CBD interacts with so many prescription meds and over-the-counter (OTC) PRODUCTS.

Again, if you’re not sure if CBD will interact with the medication that you might be taking, a consultation with a health professional will not harm — unlike trying to figure out these interactions on your own.

Livvy Ashton

Livvy is a registered nurse (RN) and board-certified nurse midwife (CNM) in the state of New Jersey. After giving birth to her newborn daughter, Livvy stepped down from her full-time position at the Children’s Hospital of New Jersey. This gave her the opportunity to spend more time writing articles on all topics related to pregnancy and prenatal care.

Does CBD Interact with Aspirin (Acetylsalicylic Acid)?

Information on risks & possible interactions between CBD & aspirin.

Article By

Cannabidiol or CBD is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid derived from the Cannabis sativa plant commonly used to manage chronic pain and inflammation.

Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) is another common painkiller bought over the counter at drugstores and supermarkets.

Despite similar effects, the level of risk for interaction between these two substances is minimal.

Table of Contents

Does CBD Interact With Aspirin?

CBD is unlikely to interact with low-dose Aspirin.

However, with higher doses or long-term use, CBD could, theoretically, increase serum levels of Aspirin over time — leading to potential side effects.

Both CBD and Aspirin are considered blood thinners and analgesics. It’s possible that this combination could lead to an increase in side effects associated with those effects — including the formation of bruises, blood loss, or liver damage.

However, in practice, none of these side effects have been reported and people who use both supplements on a daily basis rarely, if ever, experience any notable side effects.

Other Names for Aspirin

Aspirin is the generic name for acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). It’s sold under many different names. All share the same risk and potential interactions.

Other names for Aspirin include:

  • Aspirin
  • Ascriptin
  • Aspergum
  • Aspirtab
  • Bayer
  • Easprin
  • Ecotrin
  • Ecpirin
  • Entercote
  • Genacote
  • Halfprin
  • Ninoprin
  • Norwich Aspirin

Similar Medications: CBD & NSAIDs

Acetaminophen is classified as an NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug). CBD and NSAIDs all share similar risks for interaction and side effects.

Here’s a list of similar medications that share a similar level of risk when combined with CBD:

  • Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, Nuprin, Caldolor & Neoprofen)
  • Celecoxib (Celebrex & Onsenal)
  • Naproxen (Aleve)
  • Ketorolac (Toradol)
  • Etodolac (Ultradol)
  • Meloxicam (Mobic)

Is It Safe to Take CBD & Aspirin Together?

It’s safe to take CBD along with low-dose Aspirin in most cases. If you’ve been prescribed high potency Aspirin, or are taking Aspirin on a daily basis to manage the risk of heart disease, it’s a good idea to speak with your doctor before starting CBD.

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While it’s unlikely CBD is going to interact with Aspirin directly, it may be contraindicated for certain types of heart disease.

Is CBD a Viable Alternative to Aspirin?

CBD is widely used for several benefits, the main ones being pain relief and management of anxiety.

For mild to moderate pain and inflammation, CBD may be a viable, and potentially even more effective option than Aspirin.

For use as a blood thinner, CBD is not comparable to Aspirin and is not considered a viable alternative.

What is Aspirin?

Aspirin, and its generic component acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). It’s a medication commonly used for the treatment of pain, inflammation, and fever. It’s classified as a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug — NSAIDs for short.

It’s widely prescribed to patients with cardiac disorders such as heart attack, heart failure, or cardiac arrests as a blood thinner that will prevent any blood clots from forming, and consequently, producing a cardiac injury.

Aspirin is readily available in pharmacies and does not need a doctor’s prescription before it can be purchased from these pharmacies. The drug is manufactured by different pharmaceutical companies and, hence, is available under different trade names, such as Bayer, Easprin, Ecotrin, and Ecoprin, to name a few.

Aspirin has a half-life of either 2 hours to 3 hours, or 15 hours to 30 hours, depending on the dose, with the former being the half-life of 100 mg or less of Aspirin. The drug is excreted mostly through the urine, almost 80 percent, and the rest is excreted via feces and sweat.

Aspirin Specs:

Drug Name Aspirin (Acetylsalicylic acid)
Trade Name Aspirin, Aspro Clear, Bayer, Disprin, Easprin, Ecotrin, Ecoprin, Entercote
Classification Non-Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID)
CYP Metabolism Liver (CYP2C19 and CYP3A)
Interaction with CBD Agonistic (Increased effects)
Risk of Interaction Low

What Does Aspirin Do?

Aspirin is used to treat a number of medical conditions that present with symptoms such as fever, pain, and inflammation. It’s one of the most commonly prescribed medications in cardiology clinics as its blood-thinning abilities are crucial for patients who have recently suffered from a heart attack or a stroke.

The mechanism of action of Aspirin includes irreversible inhibition of the enzyme, Cyclooxygenase or COX, which is crucial for the synthesis and distribution of prostaglandins and thromboxane in the body.

There are two different types of cyclooxygenases in the human body, namely COX1 and COX2 enzymes with the former being responsible for the production of thromboxanes, a hormone responsible for vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation in the blood vessels.

COX1 is irreversibly inhibited by Aspirin, whereas COX2, the enzyme responsible for the production of the hormone prostaglandins which induces the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, activity is modified by the drug.

COX2 activity modification results in the conversion of the enzyme’s ability to produce prostaglandins to producing a lipoxygenase enzyme which helps with the metabolism of different polyunsaturated fats in the human body.

The inhibitory effect of Aspirin on the COX1 enzyme helps the medication manage bleeding as irreversible inhibition of thromboxane A2 in platelets inhibits platelet aggregation for 7 days to 8 days, the life span of the affected platelet. This mechanism is responsible for the prescription of Aspirin to patients with a history of heart attack, strokes, transient ischemic attack, and unstable angina, to help prevent recurrence of these medical emergencies.

Prostaglandins play a huge role in the information transmission from the brain to the different parts of the body suffering from pain and inflammation. They are also known to have an effect on the regulation of the hypothalamus’ thermal center, hence altering body temperature and interrupting the body’s temperature homeostasis.

Inhibition of these prostaglandins by inhibiting the enzyme required for their synthesis is essential for the management of pain and inflammation in the body. Aspirin can manage and treat fever-like symptoms by inhibiting these hormones and inducing proper regulation of body temperature.

Irreversible inhibition of local hormones in the body, and eventually platelet aggregation is what separates Aspirin from other NSAIDs such as Ibuprofen and Diclofenac as they are reversible inhibitors.

Adverse Effects of Aspirin

Aspirin is a widely available, over-the-counter medication that is used by almost all age groups. However, it’s crucial to keep in mind the fact that there are several side effects of this medication that need to be considered.

Aspirin use is contraindicated in pregnancy, especially after the 20th week of pregnancy as it can result in kidney disorders in the fetus as a result of decreased levels of amniotic fluid.

Moreover, it isn’t recommended to be used in children with influenza or the common cold, as it can result in the development of a nearly fatal, progressive brain disease known as Reye’s Syndrome. The use of this medication is contraindicated to patients on warfarin treatment or those with disorders affecting the lining of the stomach such as peptic ulcers and gastritis. The medication should not be taken with alcohol.

Some of the common side effects of Aspirin include:

  • Skin rash
  • Gastrointestinal ulcers
  • Abdominal pain
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Abdominal distress
  • Heartburn
  • Tinnitus
  • Drowsiness
  • Headache

Aspirin should not be used if there is a history of gastrointestinal disorders, without the recommendation of a healthcare professional.

Some of the more severe side effects of Aspirin include:

  • Retinal vein occlusion
  • Cerebral microbleeds
  • Reye Syndrome
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding

Types of Drug Interaction With CBD

Cannabidiol or CBD has several benefits that can be credited for its rising popularity, however, it can produce severe complications when it interacts with other drugs.

CBD can interact with other drugs to produce either increased or decreased effects of the main drug.

These interactions can have either low, moderate, or severe clinical significance with low interactions not requiring any form of precaution, moderate interactions being avoided unless medically necessary, and severe being avoided at all costs.

Based on the effect of CBD on the main drug, the CBD-drug interactions can be classified into three types:

1. Agonistic Interaction

CBD increases the effect of the drug by exerting the same effects. This is common in drugs that share similar painkilling, sedative, anxiolytic, or anti-inflammatory effects.

2. Antagonistic Interaction

CBD decreases the effect of the drug by either clearing the drug from the system faster or inhibiting its effects. This is common in drugs with effects that are opposite to CBD — such as stimulants, emetics, or low blood pressure medications.

3. Metabolic Competition

CBD blocks or competes with the metabolism of medications in the liver. This can cause the concentrations of both substances to increase in the bloodstream, potentially leading to side effects.

This interaction is most concerning for medications used on a daily basis because it can cause levels to rise to dangerous levels over time.

Key Takeaways: Can CBD and Aspirin be Taken Together?

CBD and Aspirin have similar effects for managing pain and inflammation. There’s some mild risk of interaction between these substances, but only when used in high doses or for long periods of time.

Most people find greater pain relief when using both Aspirin and CBD together.

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