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barney ghetto

Barney ghetto
Famous Friends Felix
What does he dream of? Freedom for him and his orphans
What wouldn’t he leave the house without? His leather bag
Hero or villain? Hero
What really annoys him? Nazi tyranny and injustice
What’s his catchphrase or best quote? ‘I have to stay with the ones that don’t want
to’
Why you love him? Because he is utterly selfless and willing to
put his life at risk to protect helpless children and defend them from the
tyranny of Nazi rule
Tell us something we might not know. Barney is based on Janusz Korczak who ran the
orphanage in the Warsaw
ghetto

Your character’s name and the book they star in . . .
Barney from ‘Once’ by Morris Gleitzman
  Your character’s name and the book they star in . . .  Barney from ‘Once’ by Morris Gleitzman Famous Friends Felix Hero or villain? Hero Why you love him? Because he is utterly selfless and willing to put his life at risk to protect helpless children and defend them from the tyranny of Nazi rule What’s…
Barney ghetto
In the dog-eat-dog business of boxing, Goldstein’s anti-Louis vote was defined as an outbreak of integrity. About it, Louis said later, ”If Ruby voted that way, that’s the way he saw it.” It was.
In December of 1947, he refereed a world heavyweight championship bout in the Garden between Joe Louis and Jersey Joe Walcott. His selection as the referee was surprising, because Louis had befriended Goldstein in the Army during World War II and had cast him in the role of referee for the first time. They were friends.
RUBY GOLDSTEIN died in Florida last week at the age of 76. In his youth he was known as the Jewel of the Ghetto, an East Sider who was brilliant one day and tarnished the next – winner of 23 straight lightweight and welterweight bouts before he was flattened by Ace Hudkins, the Nebraska Wildcat, in four rounds at the Coney Island Velodrome on June 25, 1926. He is remembered by us as a man with a tragic face.
Soon after the bout he went to Europe on an exhibiton tour. It was a whirlwind trip, but whenever Louis found time to pause he reflected on Goldstein’s vote against him. ”I can’t understand it,” the old fighter told his companions. ”How could Ruby do it? He was my friend.”
The place of Goldstein’s first professional defeat is gone, victim of the wrecker’s greed. Of this we carry no mental picture. But of Ruby himself we carry the inward image of a face all tragic and drawn, filled with the lights and shadows of a countenance haunted by the desolation of defeat.
At the end of 15 rounds, Goldstein voted for Jersey Joe Walcott. Only the intercession of the two judges preserved Louis’s title. The Brown Bomber never got over what he defined as Goldstein’s perfidy.
Sid Terris was Ruby Goldstein’s rival for the affection of the fans. He, too, moved in the ring with an elegant grace. Even before Goldstein fought Hudkins, Terris had encountered the Nebraska Wildcat. Out in East Chicago, Ind., Terris and Hudkins staged a fierce 10-round battle on July 10, 1925. Terris got the decision.
When Sugar Ray Robinson fought Joey Maxim in the 110-degree heat of Yankee Stadium in June, 1952, Goldstein was overwhelmed by the heat and had to quit the ring. Ray Miller replaced him for the 11th round.
Ruby Goldstein had a wry sense of humor, but he was burdened by an inward sense of inadequacy. He was always asking others to tell him in what esteem he was held in boxing.
RUBY GOLDSTEIN died in Florida last week at the age of 76. In his youth he was known as the Jewel of the Ghetto, an East Sider who was brilliant one day and tarnished the next – winner of 23 straight lightweight and welterweight bouts before he was flattened by Ace Hudkins, the Nebraska Wildcat, in four rounds at the Coney Island Velodrome on June 25, 1926. He is remembered by us as a man with a tragic face. The place of Goldstein's first professional defeat is gone, victim of the wrecker's greed. Of this we carry no mental picture. But of Ruby himself we carry the inward image of a face all tragic and drawn, filled with the lights and shadows of a countenance haunted by the desolation of defeat.